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Re: Teacher Protests Disturbing Neighborhood
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Deal reached to end Jersey City teacher strike
Updated 9:55 PM; Posted 9:53 PM (3/18/2018)

By Terrence T. McDonald

tmcdonald@jjournal.com

The Jersey Journal

A deal was reached tonight to end the Jersey City teachers' strike after a 13-hour negotiation session Sunday between school district and union officials.

The tentative agreement on a new teachers' contract, if approved by the nine-member school board and members of the teachers union, would end an eight-month dispute between the 29,000-student district and its 3,100 teachers.


http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... _city_teacher_strike.html

Posted on: 3/18 21:45
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Jersey City teacher strike starts with whirlwind day, but how long will it last?
Updated Mar 16, 7:47 PM; Posted Mar 16, 7:47 PM

By Terrence T. McDonald tmcdonald@jjournal.com

The Jersey Journal

Thousands of Jersey City teachers walked off the job today to protest stalled contract negotiations, leading to a chaotic day that saw boisterous protests outside city schools and a judge ordering teachers to get back to their classrooms on Monday morning.

Students all over Jersey City skipped class to join their teachers on the picket line. Teachers at McNair Academic High School yelling "scab" tried to block substitute teachers from entering the school. And hundreds of teachers marched to the school district's Claremont Avenue headquarters in the late morning as a stereo blasted Twisted Sister's "We're Not Gonna Take It."

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... y.html#incart_2box_hudson

Posted on: 3/17 10:37
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Judge orders Jersey City teachers to end strike
Updated 5:07 PM; Posted 5:07 PM

By Terrence T. McDonald tmcdonald@jjournal.com

The Jersey Journal

JERSEY CITY — Hudson County Superior Court Judge Barry P. Sarkisian on Friday ordered Jersey City teachers to end their strike and go back to work on Monday morning.

Sarkisian made his decision following an hourlong hearing that found Lester Taylor, an attorney for Jersey City's public-school district, and Sarkisian noting that New Jersey law bars teachers from going on strike.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... e.html#incart_river_index

Posted on: 3/16 17:14
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Thanks - she and friends decided to skip school anyway, doesn't care about attendance

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JerseyCityNj wrote:
Quote:

AlexC wrote:
Rumor has it from my Senior HS daughter that teachers won't be showing up for work tomorrow.

Anyone else hear this?


If the teachers strike and she goes to either Dickinson, Ferris, Lincoln or Snyder I would let her stay home that day. If she goes to Liberty or McNair she should be fine.

I was a student during the last strike the schools won't be able to hire enough substitutes to control the kids. All they will do is put all the students in Auditoriums, Gyms and Cafeterias and the kids will quickly realize they run the show until this strike is over.


Posted on: 3/16 15:47
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I talked to someone at Dickinson, there was no substitute teachers and the students were throwing eggs. I guess those eggs can easily pass through the metal detectors.

Posted on: 3/16 13:29
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Fulop defends hands-off approach on teacher strike

JERSEY CITY — Mayor Steve Fulop said he's largely staying out of the contract dispute that has led to today's Jersey City teacher strike, despite pleas by the teachers union to help broker a deal.

Fulop, speaking at a City Hall press conference, said he's both sympathetic to teachers, who are seeking lower health care costs, and the school district, which says it is facing a $65 million deficit in the 2018-19 school year.

The mayor, whose rise to political power coincided with his efforts to elect education reformers to the nine-member school board, today defended his hands-off approach with the teachers’ contract.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... ch_on_teacher_strike.html


Posted on: 3/16 13:14
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Gee, a strike and protest being disruptive? Say it ain't so. News flash: water is wet.

Posted on: 3/16 12:24
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Teachers were outside Dickinson HS protesting, while students were rioting inside, many cop cars responded to the school.

Posted on: 3/16 11:31
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Jersey City's 4,000-member teachers union strikes for first time since 1998
Updated 8:10 AM; Posted 7:06 AM


By Patrick Villanova The Jersey Journal

For the first time in 20 years, Jersey City's public school teachers have gone on strike.

The work stoppage, which will see some 3,100 teachers walk off the job today, comes after months of failed negotiations between the Jersey City Education Authority -- the union representing the teachers and other school employees -- and the Jersey City Board of Education.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... o.html#incart_2box_hudson

** **

I hope it doesn’t last as long as this one did. It was fun having off as a kid but 23 days was a little too long.

March 4, 1970 Asbury Park Press: “Jersey City Teachers' Strike Ends JERSEY CITY - Negotiators for Jersey City teachers and the Board of Education reached a tentative agreement early today on a two-year contract to end the 23-day-old strike. School Board officials declared today a "holiday" after the agreement was reached at 2:15 a.m. One spokesman said the move was to avoid the day's being listed as "closed due to strike." The teachers' union, the Jersey City Education Association, was scheduled to have a membership meeting in its Bergen Avenue headquarters today to ratify the agreement. Union leaders said they would recommend that the contract be approved. There was no immediate word on what the new contract includes. However, Dan Rosser, a spokesman for the New Jersey Education Association, said it has "a wide range of improvements in the educational program as well as changes in the terms and conditions of teacher employment." The teachers had asked for pay raises up to $4,400.

Their starting salary is now $7,000. The strike, which began Feb. 9, lasted the same number of days as the Newark teachers walkout, which ended one week ago. First negotiations to end the dispute did not start until Thursday night. The School Board obtained a court injunction against the strike during its first week. So far, 22 teachers have been arrested and charged with violating the court order. Before the strike, Mayor Thomas J. Whelan had announced he would close the schools next September if the state did not pay for the city's educational costs. He subsequently filed suit against the state, demanding that it fulfill its "constitutional obligations." Some 1,650 teachers, 39,000 students and 34 schools were affected by the walkout.”



Interesting numbers in the articles: JC public school student population is 25% smaller today than in 1970 (29K vs 39K) but there are almost twice as many teachers as back then (3,100 vs. 1,650). I know that mandated teacher to student ratios have improved and are legally set and mandated, but it seems like a huge difference. Can anyone explain the numbers a bit more?

Posted on: 3/16 8:44
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JerseyCityNj wrote:
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AlexC wrote:
Rumor has it from my Senior HS daughter that teachers won't be showing up for work tomorrow.

Anyone else hear this?


If the teachers strike and she goes to either Dickinson, Ferris, Lincoln or Snyder I would let her stay home that day. If she goes to Liberty or McNair she should be fine.

I was a student during the last strike the schools won't be able to hire enough substitutes to control the kids. All they will do is put all the students in Auditoriums, Gyms and Cafeterias and the kids will quickly realize they run the show until this strike is over.



It appears that may be happening:

(Excerpt From the JJ) ...Teachers at School 11 on Bergen Avenue in Journal Square are chanting similar refrains to their counterparts at McNair.

One teacher reported only seeing four substitutes enter the building. Some parents are frustrated about the strike.

"What can I tell you, it's honestly annoying," one woman said. "There's no teachers inside and I can't drop her off because I don't know who's here."

Source

Posted on: 3/16 8:41
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Jersey City's 4,000-member teachers union strikes for first time since 1998
Updated 8:10 AM; Posted 7:06 AM


By Patrick Villanova The Jersey Journal

For the first time in 20 years, Jersey City's public school teachers have gone on strike.

The work stoppage, which will see some 3,100 teachers walk off the job today, comes after months of failed negotiations between the Jersey City Education Authority -- the union representing the teachers and other school employees -- and the Jersey City Board of Education.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... o.html#incart_2box_hudson

** **

I hope it doesn’t last as long as this one did. It was fun having off as a kid but 23 days was a little too long.

March 4, 1970 Asbury Park Press: “Jersey City Teachers' Strike Ends JERSEY CITY - Negotiators for Jersey City teachers and the Board of Education reached a tentative agreement early today on a two-year contract to end the 23-day-old strike. School Board officials declared today a "holiday" after the agreement was reached at 2:15 a.m. One spokesman said the move was to avoid the day's being listed as "closed due to strike." The teachers' union, the Jersey City Education Association, was scheduled to have a membership meeting in its Bergen Avenue headquarters today to ratify the agreement. Union leaders said they would recommend that the contract be approved. There was no immediate word on what the new contract includes. However, Dan Rosser, a spokesman for the New Jersey Education Association, said it has "a wide range of improvements in the educational program as well as changes in the terms and conditions of teacher employment." The teachers had asked for pay raises up to $4,400.

Their starting salary is now $7,000. The strike, which began Feb. 9, lasted the same number of days as the Newark teachers walkout, which ended one week ago. First negotiations to end the dispute did not start until Thursday night. The School Board obtained a court injunction against the strike during its first week. So far, 22 teachers have been arrested and charged with violating the court order. Before the strike, Mayor Thomas J. Whelan had announced he would close the schools next September if the state did not pay for the city's educational costs. He subsequently filed suit against the state, demanding that it fulfill its "constitutional obligations." Some 1,650 teachers, 39,000 students and 34 schools were affected by the walkout.”


Posted on: 3/16 8:18
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iGreg wrote:
Approx what is a tenured JC teacher earning?
with summers off and pension plan....


From the state Dept. of Ed:

Median Teacher Salary (2016-17): $74,660

Posted on: 3/16 1:17
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Approx what is a tenured JC teacher earning?
with summers off and pension plan....

Posted on: 3/16 1:11
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AlexC wrote:
Rumor has it from my Senior HS daughter that teachers won't be showing up for work tomorrow.

Anyone else hear this?


If the teachers strike and she goes to either Dickinson, Ferris, Lincoln or Snyder I would let her stay home that day. If she goes to Liberty or McNair she should be fine.

I was a student during the last strike the schools won't be able to hire enough substitutes to control the kids. All they will do is put all the students in Auditoriums, Gyms and Cafeterias and the kids will quickly realize they run the show until this strike is over.


Posted on: 3/16 0:36
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Sounds correct, BoE just robo called to inform the teachers are striking

Posted on: 3/15 23:43
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Rumor has it from my Senior HS daughter that teachers won't be showing up for work tomorrow.

Anyone else hear this?

Posted on: 3/15 21:35
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The Wall St Journal yesterday noted that AFSCME in Florida has almost 50,000 workers, but only 1,369 dues paying members. Many states are enacting laws requiring union recertification-when this happened in Wisconsin AFSCME lost 54% of its members in one year. Janus vs AFSCME will be huuuuge.

Posted on: 3/15 11:24
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As Jersey City teachers' strike threat looms, deal to end dispute in works

The Jersey City school board may vote on a deal today intended to end an eight-month contract dispute with the public school district's teachers and avoid the first Jersey City teachers' strike in 20 years.

A contract offer by the district is "under the final stages of synthesis," and the board will discuss and vote on it at its meeting today, according to Board of Education President Sudhan Thomas. The teachers have worked under an expired contract since Sept. 1.

http://www.nj.com/jjournal-news/index ... city_teachers_strike.html


Posted on: 3/15 10:32
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I don't know the precise definitions of what constitutes Silver, Gold, and Platinum plans. Suffice it to say that the health insurance plan options are all very good insurance. Low deductibles, low co-pays, large networks, etc.

I would not object to the district agreeing to pick up a larger percentage of the tab IF the options included lower priced insurance, with the percentage going up if the worker chooses a more expensive plan. It's not all in the district's control, however.

The law passed by Christie really is inane. Mandate contributions by workers for several years, then throw it onto the school districts to bargain later. It basically was a way to get a short term budget fix (and he still couldn't balance the budget), stick it to unions, and then leave it to everyone else to handle when he left office.

JP, the point of the label of “platinum” and “Cadillac” is to create a notion that these healthcare plans are these incredible items of luxury granted for free. It is the linguistics of class warfare whereby one group gets pitted against another because that group has something another cannot obtain. It serves nothing other than a need to enflame.

As for the healthcare, I have friends and family that are teachers. I have been told that they make less this year than last due to the rise in healthcare contributions while seeing a decrease in the amount of a raise.

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Monroe wrote:
Tbird, AFSCME Iowa has only 29% dues paying members, that's why they're fighting this all over-no mandatory dues in Iowa.

JP, in 2017 all other NJ state unions agreed to small changes in plan coverage, NJ Teachers Union refused. The result was their plan costs went up 8.4% vs 3.4% for the other unions.

Fun facts:
1. Unions created the 5 day work week.
2. Unions negotiate on behalf of the worker and just because you see them as corrupt doesn’t make it true.
3. Right-to-work states have lower wages for workers. This is a proven fact. The Heritage Foundation, a right-wing think-tank, has explicitly stated that this is correct along with multiple other research groups.

The greatest issue in America today is the wealth divide. The “haves” control more and more of the wealth while the “have nots”.

Why anyone would continue to push this sort of agenda is beyond me. In fact, continuing to push towards a welfare state will be our nation’s downfall, if the great pumpkin doesn’t destroy our economy first.

Posted on: 3/6 14:09
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Oh well, maybe victories like this one will help people realize how important it is to pay and take part. Unions aren't going anywhere.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/na ... -governor-says/398850002/

Posted on: 3/6 14:04
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Tbird, AFSCME Iowa has only 29% dues paying members, that's why they're fighting this all over-no mandatory dues in Iowa.

JP, in 2017 all other NJ state unions agreed to small changes in plan coverage, NJ Teachers Union refused. The result was their plan costs went up 8.4% vs 3.4% for the other unions.

Posted on: 3/6 12:57
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I don't know the precise definitions of what constitutes Silver, Gold, and Platinum plans. Suffice it to say that the health insurance plan options are all very good insurance. Low deductibles, low co-pays, large networks, etc.

I would not object to the district agreeing to pick up a larger percentage of the tab IF the options included lower priced insurance, with the percentage going up if the worker chooses a more expensive plan. It's not all in the district's control, however.

The law passed by Christie really is inane. Mandate contributions by workers for several years, then throw it onto the school districts to bargain later. It basically was a way to get a short term budget fix (and he still couldn't balance the budget), stick it to unions, and then leave it to everyone else to handle when he left office.

Posted on: 3/6 12:06
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Nonsense, wherever there is choice to opt out of forced contributions-many do.


Can you site specific examples with actual numbers that indicate "many", ideally from a credible source? "Many" should be a number that is large in percentage terms.

Posted on: 3/6 10:29
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Nonsense, wherever there is choice to opt out of forced contributions-many do.

Posted on: 3/6 6:52
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Janus vs AFSCME can't be decided soon enough. Gov Murphy hiring, then firing Paula White, as Asst Commissioner for the State Board of Education (a well qualified black woman, natch), because the NJEA didn't like her stand on charters-well, it's time to fix that.


Try to squash unions, you're only going to make them roar louder. Look at the recent momentum in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Pittsburgh, and maybe now JC. JANUS--whichever way it is decided--will be an opportunity to reinvigorate the grassroot bases. Don't count anyone out.

#unionstrong

Posted on: 3/5 10:13
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Janus vs AFSCME can't be decided soon enough. Gov Murphy hiring, then firing Paula White, as Asst Commissioner for the State Board of Education (a well qualified black woman, natch), because the NJEA didn't like her stand on charters-well, it's time to fix that.

Posted on: 3/3 7:40
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Pebble wrote:
Addendum:
Because I know that neither of you two parrots have a single clue about what the NJ Teacher’s Union has for healthcare benefits, I’ll do you both a favor and educate you. This is a link to the specifics on the policies.

Maybe you’ll click on the link or maybe you’ll just go running to whatever right-wing website keeps promoting the lies you’re spewing, but I’m going to throw out the idea that spending $1,000 per month for healthcare isn’t what I’d call “Platinum Plan” or “Cadillac Plan” unless the individuals are actually receiving platinum rings along with a new Cadillac Escalade every single month.


I'm staying out of the debate over what teachers should and should not have, but wanted to at least put the correct information here. Take a look at this pdf, which is much clearer: http://www.nj.gov/treasury/pensions/d ... 017/ha0884-biweekly18.pdf

What you have shown on your pdf is the full cost of the plan, not what the teacher pays. The document I linked shows what the teachers actually pay (look at the last page). For example, those that were hired recently and make $45k, they only pay 10% of the total premium.

Also, FYI - "platinum plan" and "cadillac plan" refers to different things. A platinum plan is one that has very low copays/coinsurance such that on average the patient only ends up paying roughly 10% and the insurer picks up 90%. A cadillac plan is a plan that is is costly (roughly $10k a year for an individual). So, technically, some of the teacher's plans would qualify as a cadillac plan and some of them most certainly are platinum plans.

Posted on: 3/2 21:29
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Pebble wrote:
Quote:

dtjcview wrote:
Quote:

Pebble wrote:
Addendum:
Because I know that neither of you two parrots have a single clue about what the NJ Teacher’s Union has for healthcare benefits, I’ll do you both a favor and educate you. This is a link to the specifics on the policies.

...


The doc ony shows payments. Taking the first plan on the list "AETNA FREEDOM10 #018" - gives this link.

http://www.nj.gov/treasury/pensions/h ... lment_2015/sbc/sbc001.pdf

Not an expert - but given the deductibles and max out-of-pocket, that sure looks like it's NJ Gold plan or better. Most private employers take around the same $1k/month but will only provide silver-level coverage. In dollar terms, that's about $12k for ~$25k benefit public sector, compared to $12k for ~$16k benefit private sector.

Not massive. But to be honest I'd prefer to give that $9k difference to teachers as a pay increase. Colletively we need to exert more downward pressure on drug and treatment costs. Teachers and public employees will shop around for treatment if it's coming out of their own pockets. As it stands, public sector plans help create the spiralling healthcare costs.

Comparing it to where I work... To get the same plan, I'd pay $250 per month. If I were to spend $1,000 per month, it would cover me, a spouse and two children or more.

Where are you getting the number that private sector averages are $1k per month for an individual?


My bad. I pulled the $1k/month from faulty memory. I pay $500/month for me + 1.

But the numbers in your original link don't make sense unless that's the full cost of the plan - and not the cost taken out of the teacher's salary. Taking the member + spouse example of $1.8k/month - that's $22k/year. More than enough for a gold plan on the open market.

The numbers though are less relevant than the principles:
1. Teachers should only have to contribute around the same amount as the private sector.
2. If they give up plan level - they should get the equivalent in salary comp.
I'm in favor of giving teachers a substantial raise.

Posted on: 3/2 20:13
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Quote:

TheBigGuy wrote:
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Monroe wrote:
Blame Barack Hussein Obama, I picked up the 'platinum' term from him.

Nice dog whistle there!

Now, please post links and references to Obama referring to teacher healthcare plans as "Platinum Plans".


Oh lovely, back to the future... here is your explanation of the Obama Care metal plans. Generally speaking a number of unions (and companies) had Platinum Plans that were deemed by the Obamacare designers as excessive and outside the guidelines for "normalizing" affordable healthcare for all people.

The IRS started to grant waivers so they would not have to pay penalties attached to their platinum plans... and of course many waivers went to Unions who happened to be big donors. For some reason UAW / SEIU come to mind, but don't quote me on those two.

http://www.medicoverage.com/health-in ... onze-silver-gold-platinum

Oh look, another stupid response to something that wasn’t written!

Since you want to wade in… Please provide the specific fact about what the NJ Teacher’s Union have as a healthcare plan. Barring than, you are yet another parrot that has zero actual knowledge. (I already know the result.)


I was not commenting on whether Obama has ever specifically commented on the NJT Union healthcare plan or the type of NJT healthcare plan under the ACA Law... just reminding other readers about the origin of metal banding and its link to the Obama ACA law.

Probably shouldn't have responded directly to your rants. It is nice to hear from you; I have not missed your manic vitriol.

Posted on: 3/2 15:09
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Pebble wrote:
Addendum:
Because I know that neither of you two parrots have a single clue about what the NJ Teacher’s Union has for healthcare benefits, I’ll do you both a favor and educate you. This is a link to the specifics on the policies.

...


The doc ony shows payments. Taking the first plan on the list "AETNA FREEDOM10 #018" - gives this link.

http://www.nj.gov/treasury/pensions/h ... lment_2015/sbc/sbc001.pdf

Not an expert - but given the deductibles and max out-of-pocket, that sure looks like it's NJ Gold plan or better. Most private employers take around the same $1k/month but will only provide silver-level coverage. In dollar terms, that's about $12k for ~$25k benefit public sector, compared to $12k for ~$16k benefit private sector.

Not massive. But to be honest I'd prefer to give that $9k difference to teachers as a pay increase. Colletively we need to exert more downward pressure on drug and treatment costs. Teachers and public employees will shop around for treatment if it's coming out of their own pockets. As it stands, public sector plans help create the spiralling healthcare costs.

Comparing it to where I work... To get the same plan, I'd pay $250 per month. If I were to spend $1,000 per month, it would cover me, a spouse and two children or more.

Where are you getting the number that private sector averages are $1k per month for an individual?

Posted on: 3/2 15:08
Dos A Cero
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