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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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That's a good point and I was making the assumption that one would want all hours access to the city. A lot of places have decent commutes if you work very regular hours and can count on getting the commuter bus/train on its schedule. My PATH commute to Union Square from downtown is also 35 minutes but it's 35 minutes whenever I leave (unless it's very late or on the weekend, when I suspect one would be SOL if one were counting on a commuter bus).

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ErinMaiden wrote:
i think it really depends on where one works. There are more ways into the city than just the path. I work in midtown and take the hoboken bus. yes, i live near the elevator, and my walk to the bus is 10 minutes (clinton & 9th), and my bus ride to the city is about 15-25 (25 when its bad traffic). Coming home, i luckily leave a bit early (5.18 bus) and its a 35 minute commute home (bus ride and walk to my front door). Way faster than when i lived downtown jc and took the path.

There are many other options than just the path depending on where you work, and there are buses a short walk down in hoboken.

Posted on: 2010/1/26 2:55
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Re: Pershing Field Area
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Pershing Field area....I actually bought here 5 years ago and can say I have been pleasantly surprised by how much i enjoyed living here. Me and my wife moved from Staten Island and always heard of horror stories in JCH, but the area fit all our needs so we gave it a shot.
We live right of JFK towards the western slope and our immediate area is filled with all quiet families of differing ethnic backgrounds. My wife drives to work and parks on the street with no incidents in the 5 years, and I take the bus to the Port Authority in NYC. There are also many hidden gem places to eat...many found with the help of people on JC List!!!

My wife and I alas are ready to move on to the burbs...but we will always fondly remember our time in the area.

Posted on: 2010/1/25 19:03
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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i think it really depends on where one works. There are more ways into the city than just the path. I work in midtown and take the hoboken bus. yes, i live near the elevator, and my walk to the bus is 10 minutes (clinton & 9th), and my bus ride to the city is about 15-25 (25 when its bad traffic). Coming home, i luckily leave a bit early (5.18 bus) and its a 35 minute commute home (bus ride and walk to my front door). Way faster than when i lived downtown jc and took the path.

There are many other options than just the path depending on where you work, and there are buses a short walk down in hoboken.

Posted on: 2010/1/25 18:27
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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Of course this explains the "mystery" of why downtown is more expensive. I think what will keep the Heights from being gentrified (for better or worse) is that even with the light rail, access to NYC is poor for the type of people you describe. As others have mentioned, real estate agents are fond of underestimating commute times and what matters is door to door. Waiting for the light rail and then waiting for the PATH adds up to more time than just taking the PATH.

It's great if some new people are happy living in the heights but before taking a real estate agent's word about the 'hood and commute; one should at least test drive the commute and check out what where you will live is like 24/7.

Quote:

snorky wrote:
Bring in the yuppies.
Bring in anyone that respects others' property.
Bring in anyone that does not crank terrible music until 2am every weekend, even after the cops have stopped by several times that summer.
Bring in anyone that will invest money into their home and neighborhood.
Bring in anyone that wants a better place to live and is willing to try to make that happen.
Bring in anyone that does not think the streets are meant for tossing trash and hocking snot.
Bring in anyone that is willing to fight for change.

I HATE Starbucks, but if bringing in people that want to see the area flourish (for whatever reason) leads to more corporate businesses/restaurants rather than the bodegas and poor quality restaurants then bring it on. In time it will lead to higher end unique restaurants.

I live here in the Heights. I like it. I don't like the inconsiderate neighbors that think they are in their homeland (where ever that may be), the scary figures that I often see around at night, the roach filled restaurants (cafe at the corner of Manhattan and Central - first week in town had breakfast there - terrible service and two roaches ran across the counter and onto my plate - I have not been back).

I want to see it flourish. I want my children to be safe. I don't want to have to call the cops on EVERY summer night so my family can go to sleep before 2am (the music starts at noon, ends at 2am - the screaming over the music goes on throughout - luckily there is cold weather or they would be outside cranking music all year). The Heights has the potential, but without some money moving in you will have to deal with all the things that must be overlooked.

Posted on: 2010/1/25 4:30
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Re: Pershing Field Area
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In The Heights, I've lived on Thorne Street and Beacon Avenue. Both areas seemed nice. I attended P.S. #25 (Nicholas Copernicus) on The Boulevard and P.S. #6 (Jotham W. Wakeman) on Saint Paul's Avenue.

Posted on: 2010/1/25 1:52
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Re: Pershing Field Area
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Better than Greenville; better than Marion.
I judged the neighborhood not good enough and traded it for downtown.

If you work in NYC, the commute is tedious. Parking is extremely tough if you don't have a driveway or garage.

Area is largely Hispanic.

Posted on: 2010/1/24 18:55
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Pershing Field Area
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Hey Everyone,

I'm thinking about moving to the Pershing Field neighborhood. Any thoughts or suggestions?

Posted on: 2010/1/24 18:28
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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If it's close to the lightrail elevator then Ogden would be the better choice for commuting into NYC. Fairmount to Journal Square would be a bus ride (or an 8 block walk) away.

Posted on: 2009/12/13 17:50
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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personally, i'd take ogden. i guess it depends where your fiance works in nyc. if it's downtown, then it would take a bit longer to get there unless you lived really close to the light rail elevator. if it's anywhere else in nyc, the jitneys to nyc pass on palisade pretty regularly, and will drop you off to 42nd street in nyc.

also, IMO the ogden ave area is nicer than the fairmount ave area. parkings harder to come by up in the ogden area though, so that's one of the trade offs

Posted on: 2009/12/13 17:04
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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Hiya,
I started the thread "340 Fairmount" because my fiance and I are looking to buy a condo either by JSQ or in the Heights . In reading over the responses on this thread and the thread i started, I'm more confused than ever. My partner + I are at an impasse with me pushing for a unit @ 340 Fairmount and him wanting a unit we saw on Ogden Ave. Space difference between the 2 is 70 sq ft, both are the same price per month. We are at a loss to tip the equation either way and I'm so frustrated about what to do.....
I commute to NYC. He drives to work within NJ.
I like hubbub and action. He likes quiet. Hey, opposites attact.
AAAAAAAgh!

Posted on: 2009/12/13 16:53
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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tko, I hear you on both counts... we loved gr8 taste and were completely bummed to see it go! A coffee shop would be fantastic, but I think it might be a while unfortunately.

My wife and I have been in the Heights for about 2.5 years, and really like it for the most part. We had some problem renters across the street when we first moved in, but a concerted phone campaign to the police amongst the neighbors put an end to that after about 4 months.
Overall, we are really happy with our living space/block and having a backyard in an urban setting is a fantastic thing!

Posted on: 2009/11/25 18:12
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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not that anyone cares, but i am pretty happy living in the heights. i live on a decent block in a restored old-ass building that would have cost a fortune if it were located anywhere else (i.e. downtown, hoboken, the city, brooklyn). that being said, i would be less happy if i didn't have a car. but, given that i work in NJ while future husband works in the city, it's (almost!) a fair trade.

my one wish is for a coffee shop to open up in the area -- on palisades!!! someone make my wish come true!

i was so sad to see gr8 taste go. now it's a generic asian takeout.

Posted on: 2009/11/25 17:46
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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I thought Xerxes was a woman.

Posted on: 2009/11/25 4:21
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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Quote:

fasteddie wrote:
Quote:

Xerxes wrote:
My memory is long and I have watched The Heights deteriorate since 1970.

Although if one must live in the Heights, Ogden Street is by far the best street


Your memory ain't as good as you think. It's Avenue, Ogden Avenue.


His memory isn't so good because all he can think about is the Jersey City Heights.

I have an idea. Why doesn't Xerxes allow the lot of us to take him on a tour of the Heights and show him what those who live here are talking about so that he can stop spewing this nonsense. I personally have a panoramic view of the New York skyline and I don't live on Ogden Ave. We can take a light rail trip and use stopwatches. We can show him the Victorian homes that line Sherman Place.

Why didn't Xerxes address what dmark526 and several others told him about what the Heights is like now? Xerxes need help.

Posted on: 2009/11/25 3:05
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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Quote:

Xerxes wrote:
My memory is long and I have watched The Heights deteriorate since 1970.

Although if one must live in the Heights, Ogden Street is by far the best street


Your memory ain't as good as you think. It's Avenue, Ogden Avenue.

Posted on: 2009/11/24 23:49
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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JennyMayla said
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I ask again: Why do people care so much about dinging another neighborhood? The idea that people have to rag on another neighborhhood to somehow justify their own is ridiculous. Live where you want to live and be thankful that there are options in this city.


Even though this wasn't addressed to me, I will answer your statement because you made a similar one in response to a post I made regarding someone that had moved to Bayonne and claimed to have a 45-minute commute into Manhattan, while travelling through the Hoboken PATH station.

I don't think that all of the people questioning the easy commutes from various parts of JC, or sorrounding area, are dinging people's choices of where to live. Certainly, when I did it, it wasn't my intention to ding, or criticize, the person who chose to move to Bayonne. My qualm was with the unrealistic/false claim that a commute from the last station in Bayonne into Manhattan could possibly be less than 45 minutes. That person was taking a shuttle from her apartment complex over by South Cove Commons into the HBLR station, which is the very last (or first, however you look at it) station in Bayonne. She was then riding the light rail train into Hoboken, where she transfers into the Hoboken PATH for a trip into Manhattan. It is IMPOSSIBLE to complete that commute in less than 45 minutes, which is what the article claimed. In the case of this other article, the author was claiming another seemingly false short commute. I say seemingly because I am not familiar with that commute, so I can not offer an opinion on that. But others, who do seem to be familiar with that commute, have stated that the claim is false, and have offered explanations as to why it is false. Questioning an article, or a claim in an article, is not dinging the subject's choice of where to live, it is simply a normal reaction when you read something that doesn't seem to hold up to scrutiny.

Anyway, I just wanted to get that off my chest. I think you know I have never had any bones to pick with you, so this is just a friendly exchange of opinions.

Keep up the good attitude.

Posted on: 2009/11/24 23:20
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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Even LESS with a 50% down payment ($277,000) and a 4% mortgage!

But not many people want to put down $114K or $277K.

In truth though, mortgage rates seem to have come down a bit but a half million for the Heights...yoi.

My memory is long and I have watched The Heights deteriorate since 1970. It took a lot to get me to give up a big rent controlled apartment but I was feeling more and more unsafe on the streets and in my home. Except for the occasional blips the trend has continued downwards as the mirror image of downtown has steadily climbed upwards.

And the trek into New York City was getting on my nerves BIG time as parking at Journal Square became more and more difficult.

The Heights' appeal is for double talking-realty ads and people priced out of downtown JC, Hoboken, and New York City...period. What's next, "The Hidden Beauties of the REAL Greenville?"

Posted on: 2009/11/24 22:19
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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The average 30-yr fixed rate is about 5%. With 25% down for a $454,000 home ($113,500), your mortgage payment would be $1,828.

Posted on: 2009/11/24 22:01
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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THe Heights"gentrification" began in the beginning of the Reagan era...they were peddling Victorian Hill, aka Summit Ave., and "The ARTS DISTRICT" aka Palisades Avenue.
They had about 5 Victorians on the Hill and exactly ONE artist on Palisades Avenue.
The "gentrification" has gone on for the last 30 years with results: ZERO! The only change is the area is more Hispanic than it was and Central Avenue is dirtier with more $.99 stores. Of any area near Manhattan, the Heights is the among the least gentrified, defying all trends.

The Heights is still the same old dump it was when I left; more tar-paper shacks covered in aluminum siding than any City in the Northeast.

Although if one must live in the Heights, Ogden Street is by far the best street and, of course, the East side of the street is the only one to consider because of the killer views from the back yard.

And the $1850 mortgage that buys a $454,000 property is STILL just real-estate-speak...utter nonsense.

Posted on: 2009/11/24 21:46
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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I would just like to point out that the Heights has incredible block-to-block diversity. Literally one block can be all well-kept houses with quiet, working inhabitants, and the next block can be noisy and run-down.

I think this explains some of the varying opinions and experiences presented here. It really depends on who your neighbors are in the Heights.

I've been a homeowner here for 2+ years with great neighbors, quiet streets, and zero annoyances. However, I can go for a short walk to experience loud horrendous music and people sitting on stoops all day with paper-bagged bottles.

Hopefully the Heights will continue to trend more toward the former crowd. One can certainly not call the Heights as a whole "gentrified" although some blocks are definitely full of friendly old-timers or young professionals.

There are great deals on rents or properties in the Heights compared to other civilized areas 20 minutes from Manhattan. But I would certainly advise anyone to visit the specific block frequently and at all hours before signing anything.

Posted on: 2009/11/24 21:45
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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I have not been on the site for awhile--but felt the need to post since the couple featured in the article are my neighbors! We both moved onto Ogden Ave about 1 month apart in 2004.

I will say I am kind of surprised to see a "gentrification" story about the heights now. I think we felt it was gentrifying 5 years ago--when we moved in--the Congress St. Light Rail station opened about the same time, and a lot of houses near me were bought by young professionals. Since then, I think progress has been slow, and I'm not sure Ogden is the appropriate street to use for a general article about the neighborhood--I think by heights standards it is regarded as one of the nicest and most stable streets, with lots of owner-occupants, and has been that way for a long time (I have several neighbors who worked as professionals in Manhattan for 20-30 years and lived in the Heights the whole time)--but I generally agree that transportation to Manhattan, while available, can be a chore, and the Heights is quiet and doesn't have a whole lot of restaurants you actually want to eat in (take-out is good, but no ambiance)--so I think that limits gentrification somewhat--we go downtown or to Hoboken (or Manhattan) if we want to go out, but since we have kids, we don't go out much anymore anyway!

I think also the Heights is feeling the real estate woes right now?houses that would have gone for much more in 2006 or so are sitting on the market for awhile?a lot of the stuff for sale needs renovation, which in a slow real estate market, buyers may feel they do not need to invest in. Most of the people I know who moved in came partly because they were priced out of Hoboken/wanted more space (lots of people with young families)--we wanted 3 bedrooms and could not afford it in Hoboken or Downtown JC. But I think now, while still expensive, the rates have not continued to climb so much in those areas, so people are staying, not moving to the Heights. A year after we bought our Ogden row house, our friend who is a realtor told me I could get $140-$150K more than what we paid for it. Now, the house has appraised (we did a re-fi) for only $40K more than what we paid 5 years ago--I suppose I should be happy the value increased at all, but part of the reason you move to an "up-and-coming" area is because you expect it to--come up! And the lack of a historic designation of some type bothers me. I don't think I can ever own a house with vinyl siding after seeing its let's say "creative" use on 100-plus year old homes here that could be so beautiful. And the few open lots on Ogden have had those awful two-families with the garage underneath built on them--Ugh! And despite the ?gentrification? I still see drug-paraphernalia garbage in Fisk park, and saw a rooster (a rooster!) walking along Frankin near Palisade. And outside of Ogden and a few other streets, the streetscapes can be really unattractive.
I will say it is a unique experience living in the Heights?I live on a cliff in a 100-year old house with a panoramic view of Manhattan, and not many people can say that. Most people come find the house very ?cool?.

Posted on: 2009/11/24 16:33
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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I'm hoping this isn't a duplicate post, but I'm not sure my first post took...

I'm originally from NYC and in 2007 my company relocated me from Philly back to New York. I looked for condos in Brooklyn, Downtown JC, Hoboken, Union City, and even Staten Island and Manhattan. My real estate agent then introduced me to the Heights. I found a beautifully rehabbed condo in a renovated brick faced brownstone on New York Ave, just around the corner from Fisk Park and I couldn't be happier. Fisk Park offers great views of the city and is a perfect place to take my dog for his daily walk.

I'm required to have a company car and I have no problem finding street parking every day, usually right in front of my home. I can get to Manhattan in 30 minutes on a jitney, or via Light Rail to the PATH from Congress. With a flexible schedule, if I need to drive to the city, it literally has taken me minutes to get into Manhattan by car. I do agree with the previous poster who said that unless the Heights becomes a PATH train destination, full gentrification will be a challenge.

Since I've been here, I've met many young professionals move into my neighborhood, many from Hoboken and some even from Manhattan. For my lifestyle and needs, I felt I got more in amenities and space than in the other places I searched. I have friends and coworkers who've purchased in Brooklyn and in Manhattan and have spent twice as much as I did, and they experience more noise, etc. than I do here in the Heights. As for me, I love being here and I'm extremely happy with my decision to own and live here.

PS - I must say, although I'm not a fan of Hoboken, in no way am I a Downtown JC hater. I love the charm of the streets and brownstones in Downtown JC. It just feels like some people have negative opinions about the Heights without actually experiencing living here. Just my opinion.

Posted on: 2009/11/24 3:54
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JCH: Food improvements
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Based on the news of a Mission Burrito in JCH I ordered. Quick delivery and amazing food.

Any other recommendations? I can recommend Rasoi over on Newark - great Indian food (try the Chicken Vindaloo - ask for spicy if you want it).

Any recommendations would be appreciated. I tend to only order from the same 4 or five places, but would like more.

Posted on: 2009/11/23 14:55
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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Quote:

snorky wrote:
Let's keep improving JCH. Let's start by being respectful of other people and we are off to a great start.

We can use our section name along with Jersey City as in Jersey City Heights no other section in the city would roll off the tounge as well.

Posted on: 2009/11/23 1:45
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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Quote:

jennymayla wrote:
I ask again: Why do people care so much about dinging another neighborhood? The idea that people have to rag on another neighborhhood to somehow justify their own is ridiculous. Live where you want to live and be thankful that there are options in this city.


Jenny, I agree! I only try to defend my neighborhood when it's being trashed -- especially by people who don't live anywhere near here. I have no interest in putting down other neighborhoods. My feeling is that if you're happy where you are, that's where you belong. Every neighborhood has its perks and drawbacks, and if you've found your own comfort zone, there's no need to talk people out of finding theirs.

Anyway, thanks for the support.

Posted on: 2009/11/22 4:39
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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mark526 wrote:

Quote:

Bullcrap! I've made it from my house (New York Ave) to 23rd street path station street level in 25 minutes flat (best time) and it's never longer than 35 minutes unless there's a major delay on the Path.

And really, 45 minutes to get from Ogden to the path station? Come on, it's 2 stops on the lightrail from 9th street to Newport station and takes no longer than 5 minutes riding time. I do it all of the time.

It (heights walking distance to 9th st elevator) may not be as convenient as living 1 block from Exchange, Grove, Or Newport, but it is more convenient than many other parts of Downtown or Hoboken.


Exactly!! The best was when I worked into the evening in midtown (11:00 p.m.) and I'd exit the Lincoln Tunnel and from that point on, it was a 6-minute drive to my front door. Going through that Hoboken exit and up the viaduct was ridiculously fast.

Posted on: 2009/11/22 4:23
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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Capn John wrote:

and for full disclosure... my wife and i live in the Heights... love it... and our house has manufactured siding that looks like wood. and it's lovely.


ps - Christine - don't spread the secret about Jose and his cooking on the corner of NY and Congress.... he's our little awesome secret!

pps - have you stopped by Mission Burritto on South and Palisades? delish!

HEY CAPN JOHN - I believe I know your house and it certainly is lovely.

We've never tried Mission Burrito, but we will. I totally understand your wanting me to keep Jose under wraps. My sister-in-law stayed with us for a couple of weeks and I think she spent more time at Jose's cart than she did in the house! He is all that. There are days when I'm really craving one of those grilled chicken tacos and if he's not there, I feel like a little kid who finds their candy store closed. He's just lucky I don't know his address...I'd be ringing his bell

I really dislike when people trash our neighborhood...it is a great area. I wouldn't mind if the things that are said were true, but they aren't and it's very frustrating.

Posted on: 2009/11/22 4:13
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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BTW, there is NO PLACE on Ogden Avenue, not even on COngress and Ogden from which you can reach the light rail platform in 5 minutes without running, catching the light just right, having an elevator waiting and then sprinting North from elevator to Light rail platform.

And THEN you wait for the right train and THEN you walk a couple blocks through the station to the PATH platform and. If you live on Ogden around Bowers or Griffith plan an extra half hour to 45 minutes before you are on the PATH platform.


Bullcrap! I've made it from my house (New York Ave) to 23rd street path station street level in 25 minutes flat (best time) and it's never longer than 35 minutes unless there's a major delay on the Path.

And really, 45 minutes to get from Ogden to the path station? Come on, it's 2 stops on the lightrail from 9th street to Newport station and takes no longer than 5 minutes riding time. I do it all of the time.

It (heights walking distance to 9th st elevator) may not be as convenient as living 1 block from Exchange, Grove, Or Newport, but it is more convenient than many other parts of Downtown or Hoboken.

Posted on: 2009/11/22 0:54
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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Xerxes wrote:
[quote]BTW, there is NO PLACE on Ogden Avenue, not even on COngress and Ogden from which you can reach the light rail platform in 5 minutes without running, catching the light just right, having an elevator waiting and then sprinting North from elevator to Light rail platform.

And THEN you wait for the right train and THEN you walk a couple blocks through the station to the PATH platform and. If you live on Ogden around Bowers or Griffith plan an extra half hour to 45 minutes before you are on the PATH platform.

I lived in the heights for many years and DROVE to Journal Square to catch the PATH.

Anyone who can call the PATH crowded and smelly has NEVER been caught in one of those jitneys stuck in the Lincoln Tunnel for a half hour...and then the jitneys drop you off at Port Authority so you need to catch a subway unless you are starring in a show on Broadway!

The commute from the Heights into Manhatttan was usually a big pain in the ass. And that's why people pay a BIG premium to be atop a PATH train station.


Number 1 - The light rail elevator is easily no more than a 5-minute walk from Ogden and Congress unless you are a 90-year old and that includes the elevator ride down.

Number 2 - Not everyone (actually not most people) who live downtown are "atop a PATH train station".

Number 3 - Unless you work just along the PATH line in NYC, and not much above 33rd Street, you have to jump on a subway, too.

Number 4 - Plenty of people work in walking distance of Port Authority. It's called midtown.

At least be honest!!

Posted on: 2009/11/21 18:55
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Re: Wave of gentrification that leapfrogged the Hudson has reached new heights - Jersey City Heights
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I can't imagine how much of a downpayment this couple made on a $454k unit if their mortgage is $1850 per month. Certainly A LOT more than 20%.


Yes, that was my first thought too. Perhaps one of those cutesy "interest only" mortgages that were so popular before the s#@t hit the fan.

And I guess there are no real estate taxes to consider and no maintenance...or HEAT?


or insurance, or electricity.. yes, there are a lot of other costs involved in owning a house. there are also other advantages, like building equity, having the freedom to raze the entire place and make it to your liking, having more space, etc. etc... are you really going to turn this into a buying vs renting rant?


Quote:


BTW, there is NO PLACE on Ogden Avenue, not even on COngress and Ogden from which you can reach the light rail platform in 5 minutes without running, catching the light just right, having an elevator waiting and then sprinting North from elevator to Light rail platform.

And THEN you wait for the right train and THEN you walk a couple blocks through the station to the PATH platform and. If you live on Ogden around Bowers or Griffith plan an extra half hour to 45 minutes before you are on the PATH platform.



that's a pretty stupid argument. i could say the same about newport (you have to lock your door... WAIT for the elevator at your apt to come... then walk out THE lobby, walk to the path, walk DOWN the escalators, and wait for the path. and if you happen TO work uptown, you have to take another subway just to get to work! imagine that.

Notice my arbitrary capitalization of WORDS, to make my point seemingly more clear.

Quote:


I lived in the heights for many years and DROVE to Journal Square to catch the PATH.

Anyone who can call the PATH crowded and smelly has NEVER been caught in one of those jitneys stuck in the Lincoln Tunnel for a half hour...and then the jitneys drop you off at Port Authority so you need to catch a subway unless you are starring in a show on Broadway!

The commute from the Heights into Manhatttan was usually a big pain in the ass. And that's why people pay a BIG premium to be atop a PATH train station.


the assumption is that everyone works in NYC, or needs to go to NYC on a daily basis. under this assumption, living downtown is better because of the PATH. if this assumption is incorrect, then you might find living in the heights more convenient.

Posted on: 2009/11/21 17:35
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