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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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jmiz wrote:
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Yvonne wrote:
In 1980, I started to work for a Catholic School in NYC. My principal paid taxes to NJ not NY. The following year, I had to pay NY state and NYC taxes. You are required to pay taxes to NY not NJ if you work in NY. My principal made the corrections when NYS came after me.


Hopefully you've changed your ways.

NJ residents do NOT pay NYC Local taxes. That's for residents of NYC only. If you do pay NYC Local as an NJ resident, you should get every last penny of that back.


Long story short: You will only get a NJ W-2 if your employer takes out NJ state taxes. If they don't, you'll receive just a Fed and NY State tax form. You'll still have to pay taxes to both states, but you'll get a credit for most of what you owe on the NJ side.


In 1980 NJ residents who worked in NYC had to pay NYC taxes, it changed when NYS gave a tax break to another NY town that also had a municipal tax. That exception also applied to NJ residents.

Posted on: 2015/2/5 23:05
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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Adonis wrote:
I went back into my tax records for 2013 and compared the NYS taxable income vs. the NJ taxable income. Our NJ taxable salaries were higher for the following 3 pre-tax deductions from our salaries:

Pre-tax Medical Flexible Spending Account (FSA) contributions
Pre-tax commuting cost contributions (Wageworks)
Pre-tax medical insurance premium payments

For filing your NJ state taxes NJ includes the above contributions as part of your taxable salary. You then can deduct your FSA contributions and medical insurance premium payments as part of your NJ state itemized deductions along with your mortgage interest and property taxes and so forth.

Our 401k contributions were treated equally by NJ and NY so that did not factor into the difference.



Part of the confusion here may be that FSA contributions are not deductible on NJ income taxes (they are for NY residents). In effect, your NJ taxable income is higher than the amount considered taxable in NY.

Posted on: 2015/2/4 19:00
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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SRhia wrote:
I agree - I don't understand why long-term domestic partnership (e.g. five or 10 years or longer, or something like that) is not legally binding (while civil union already is), in NJ.

What does a piece of paper mean these days anyways (given that divorce is so rampant!!!)???


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bodhipooh said:

You know, I find it interesting that the civil union statute/benefits remain in place now that gay marriage (I think the PC term is same-sex marriage!) is now allowed in NJ. It has been a little over a year, actually. So, right now, the civil union legal status and its tax implications is a benefit extended to same-sex partners but not to opposite-sex couples. What's the rationale there at this point?

And, to be clear, I am not trolling. I am actually asking this in a sort of philosophical, out-loud musing kind of way. Why should a same-sex couple (that has the right and ability to enter into marriage) be entitled to a benefit not available to an opposite-sex couple that may be in an equally committed relationship. As SRhia says, she lives with her partner and they have kids. Kinda hard to not describe that as a committed relationship.


I'm not sure what benefit you're talking about? Civil union status isn't just granted by virtue of living together - couples have to actively enter into it, just like marriage. So any couple in NJ can choose to fill out the necessary paperwork and pay the necessary fees and then their relationship will be legally recognized by the state.

Long-term domestic partnerships aren't automatically recognized b/c the state doesn't want to be responsible for checking on where you live, whether you have a joint checking account, etc. If the benefits of legal marriage are important to you, it's simple to get legally married. (From a strictly bureaucratic perspective, of course! If you and your partner aren't on the same page, or you want to be married during a lavish wedding, etc., those are different issues.)

Posted on: 2015/2/4 18:52
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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Health Insurance, Dental Insurance

Posted on: 2015/2/4 18:19
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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Ahhh I see. Do you know what the specific Cafe 125 benefit is? For my company it is the annual life insurance premium that it pays on my behalf for the life insurance coverage that all employees get.

Posted on: 2015/2/4 15:28
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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I found the difference…. was Cafe 125.

Posted on: 2015/2/4 2:26
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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I agree - I don't understand why long-term domestic partnership (e.g. five or 10 years or longer, or something like that) is not legally binding (while civil union already is), in NJ.

What does a piece of paper mean these days anyways (given that divorce is so rampant!!!)???


Quote:

bodhipooh said:

You know, I find it interesting that the civil union statute/benefits remain in place now that gay marriage (I think the PC term is same-sex marriage!) is now allowed in NJ. It has been a little over a year, actually. So, right now, the civil union legal status and its tax implications is a benefit extended to same-sex partners but not to opposite-sex couples. What's the rationale there at this point?

And, to be clear, I am not trolling. I am actually asking this in a sort of philosophical, out-loud musing kind of way. Why should a same-sex couple (that has the right and ability to enter into marriage) be entitled to a benefit not available to an opposite-sex couple that may be in an equally committed relationship. As SRhia says, she lives with her partner and they have kids. Kinda hard to not describe that as a committed relationship.

Posted on: 2015/2/3 3:58
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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SRhia wrote:
Uh! Oh well. Maybe one day....eventually....that dotted line...maybe...

Thanks @bodhipooh.

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bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

SRhia wrote:
A little bit off topic, but since we're talking about tax, can I ask this question:

Both my partner and I (opposite sex relationship, never legally married - just living together for a few years) live and work in NJ. Can we file as "married" (since we live together and have kids), or should we file separately as individuals/Head of household (since we never signed on the dotted line)?

TIA.


Definitely NO. Here is the applicable information on the subject:

NJ Filing Status


You know, I find it interesting that the civil union statute/benefits remain in place now that gay marriage (I think the PC term is same-sex marriage!) is now allowed in NJ. It has been a little over a year, actually. So, right now, the civil union legal status and its tax implications is a benefit extended to same-sex partners but not to opposite-sex couples. What's the rationale there at this point?

And, to be clear, I am not trolling. I am actually asking this in a sort of philosophical, out-loud musing kind of way. Why should a same-sex couple (that has the right and ability to enter into marriage) be entitled to a benefit not available to an opposite-sex couple that may be in an equally committed relationship. As SRhia says, she lives with her partner and they have kids. Kinda hard to not describe that as a committed relationship.

Posted on: 2015/2/3 3:45
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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SRhia wrote:
Uh! Oh well. Maybe one day....eventually....that dotted line...maybe...

Thanks @bodhipooh.

Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

SRhia wrote:
A little bit off topic, but since we're talking about tax, can I ask this question:

Both my partner and I (opposite sex relationship, never legally married - just living together for a few years) live and work in NJ. Can we file as "married" (since we live together and have kids), or should we file separately as individuals/Head of household (since we never signed on the dotted line)?

TIA.


Definitely NO. Here is the applicable information on the subject:

NJ Filing Status


It's fun to intro your partner as your "future tax rebate"...

Posted on: 2015/2/3 1:49
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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Uh! Oh well. Maybe one day....eventually....that dotted line...maybe...

Thanks @bodhipooh.

Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

SRhia wrote:
A little bit off topic, but since we're talking about tax, can I ask this question:

Both my partner and I (opposite sex relationship, never legally married - just living together for a few years) live and work in NJ. Can we file as "married" (since we live together and have kids), or should we file separately as individuals/Head of household (since we never signed on the dotted line)?

TIA.


Definitely NO. Here is the applicable information on the subject:

NJ Filing Status

Posted on: 2015/2/3 1:34
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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SRhia wrote:
A little bit off topic, but since we're talking about tax, can I ask this question:

Both my partner and I (opposite sex relationship, never legally married - just living together for a few years) live and work in NJ. Can we file as "married" (since we live together and have kids), or should we file separately as individuals/Head of household (since we never signed on the dotted line)?

TIA.


Definitely NO. Here is the applicable information on the subject:

NJ Filing Status

Posted on: 2015/2/3 1:20
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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A little bit off topic, but since we're talking about tax, can I ask this question:

Both my partner and I (opposite sex relationship, never legally married - just living together for a few years) live and work in NJ. Can we file as "married" (since we live together and have kids), or should we file separately as individuals/Head of household (since we never signed on the dotted line)?

TIA.

Posted on: 2015/2/2 22:45
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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I went back into my tax records for 2013 and compared the NYS taxable income vs. the NJ taxable income. Our NJ taxable salaries were higher for the following 3 pre-tax deductions from our salaries:

Pre-tax Medical Flexible Spending Account (FSA) contributions
Pre-tax commuting cost contributions (Wageworks)
Pre-tax medical insurance premium payments

For filing your NJ state taxes NJ includes the above contributions as part of your taxable salary. You then can deduct your FSA contributions and medical insurance premium payments as part of your NJ state itemized deductions along with your mortgage interest and property taxes and so forth.

Our 401k contributions were treated equally by NJ and NY so that did not factor into the difference.

Posted on: 2015/2/2 20:47
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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Adonis

That is the exact situation we are in. She does not contribute to any retirement plan / deducted any amount for health or travel expenses... so I think the difference between the lower NY State wage and the higher NJ State wage is just that, as I have a 401k where money is sent pre-tax. I will calculate tonight.


Posted on: 2015/2/2 17:51
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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Both my wife and I have been living in jersey city and working in NYC for many years. My employer has always given me one W-2. But my wife always got two W-2's. She would get a "normal" w-2 that stated her federal income and NYS income. It would also show the NYS income taxes withheld. Then she would get another W-2 that showed NJ state wages and zero nj taxes withheld. The nj state wages were always a little bit higher than the NY w-2 because the state of nj does not include certain contributions my wife was making as "pre-tax" contributions. So she has to pay nj taxes on those contributions. I forget which contributions those are but it might have been pretax contributions for commuting costs (Wage Works) or something like that.

It seems to me the second w-2 is simply to inform the recipient that your taxable income in nj is slightly different than your taxable income in NY. That's it. It doesn't mean you are going to be "double taxed" or anything silly like that.

Posted on: 2015/1/31 19:58
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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jmiz wrote:
Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
In 1980, I started to work for a Catholic School in NYC. My principal paid taxes to NJ not NY. The following year, I had to pay NY state and NYC taxes. You are required to pay taxes to NY not NJ if you work in NY. My principal made the corrections when NYS came after me.


Hopefully you've changed your ways.

NJ residents do NOT pay NYC Local taxes. That's for residents of NYC only. If you do pay NYC Local as an NJ resident, you should get every last penny of that back.


Long story short: You will only get a NJ W-2 if your employer takes out NJ state taxes. If they don't, you'll receive just a Fed and NY State tax form. You'll still have to pay taxes to both states, but you'll get a credit for most of what you owe on the NJ side.


I think the laws may have been different decades ago. Certainly you shouldn't be paying NYC income tax now.

Posted on: 2015/1/31 19:21
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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Yvonne wrote:
In 1980, I started to work for a Catholic School in NYC. My principal paid taxes to NJ not NY. The following year, I had to pay NY state and NYC taxes. You are required to pay taxes to NY not NJ if you work in NY. My principal made the corrections when NYS came after me.


Hopefully you've changed your ways.

NJ residents do NOT pay NYC Local taxes. That's for residents of NYC only. If you do pay NYC Local as an NJ resident, you should get every last penny of that back.


Long story short: You will only get a NJ W-2 if your employer takes out NJ state taxes. If they don't, you'll receive just a Fed and NY State tax form. You'll still have to pay taxes to both states, but you'll get a credit for most of what you owe on the NJ side.

Posted on: 2015/1/31 18:27
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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mscottc wrote:
The state taxes really are one of the more simpler parts of the Turbotax process, as long as you understand the concept that Non-Resident earnings and wages must be dealt with prior to doing your Resident state return.


I've been doing the same NY & NJ returns for over a decade and I've found the state portions to be the most poorly written and obscure portions of TT. There's lots of questions that are not obvious and have no explanations of what they mean like they have in the Fed part. And my wife has never gotten anything but a single standard w-2 form.

Posted on: 2015/1/31 18:02
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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dtjcview wrote:
NJ vs NY can be messy on your w2, and mess up your return if you you use turbotax or other electronic filing. In the past I had to subtract NYC earnings from the NJ earning total to plug in the correct values on the state returns - given you have to file both NJ and NY.

The other advice I'd give - you may want to maximize your days worked in NJ. Think you can allocate days over the year to either state.



I've worked in NYC and lived in NJ for over 25 years now. I've also been doing my own taxes with Turbotax for about 10 years. I am using TT Premier, and I download 3 states in total (1 free and 2 paid unfortunately) including 1 for a state in which I share ownership in what is now rental property.

I have never had issues with Turbotax and my NY/NJ returns. The concept is very simple, and if you follow the Turbotax "Interview" process it all works out.

First of all, you pay taxes on where you earned the income. For most of us in this situation, that's NYC/NYS. Also realize that income earned while you are on vacation, sick days, or assignment in another state, for any legit reason, is not taxed in NY, but in the state of which you were in.

So when you get to the States part of the interview, always do NY and all of your other non-resident income is earned. NY will specifically ask you if a certain percentage of your NY wages were earned out of state, i.e. out of NY State. It will ask a few questions about days you worked vs holidays and sick days etc. Based on all the information provided, it will correctly fill out your NYS return. Do the same with other states in which you earned income.

Finally you do your home state, aka New Jersey. Turbotax will start your calculations normally, but will then apply a credit to your bottom line (figuratively speaking) of the New Jersey tax bill. Yes, you will have wound up sending a whole lot more money to NY than Jersey (this statement includes monies withheld, not just refunds or taxes due at filing), but that's the way the system is designed to work. Turbotax also used to include copies of the non-residents state forms to be sent in with your primary resident state, but I don't think that's required any more.

Additionally, Turbotax will guide you as to which states should (or can) be filed electronically and which need to be mailed in. The state taxes really are one of the more simpler parts of the Turbotax process, as long as you understand the concept that Non-Resident earnings and wages must be dealt with prior to doing your Resident state return.

Posted on: 2015/1/31 16:47
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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I am a believer in the affordable tax services of Chris Johnson of CAJ Tax Solutions. They're located in Downtown JC and helped me out of quite a bind several years back. Professional, timely and thorough, Chris is also easy going and has a sense of humor. You can call him at 201-467-4-TAX. His email is cajtax@solutions4u.com.

BTW, in my experience, you can, if you insist, make a copy of one of your W-2s. So long as the states get theirs, they tend not to mind the "original" issue. Done it many times.

Posted on: 2015/1/31 6:24
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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NJ vs NY can be messy on your w2, and mess up your return if you you use turbotax or other electronic filing. In the past I had to subtract NYC earnings from the NJ earning total to plug in the correct values on the state returns - given you have to file both NJ and NY.

The other advice I'd give - you may want to maximize your days worked in NJ. Think you can allocate days over the year to either state.

Posted on: 2015/1/30 22:32
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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I've worked in NYC for almost 18 years now, and have never received anything other than a W2 that has four stubs (Federal copy, NYS copy, personal records copy, and an additional one) and state taxes have only been withheld for NYS. Two different employers, same setup.

Posted on: 2015/1/30 22:04
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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In 1980, I started to work for a Catholic School in NYC. My principal paid taxes to NJ not NY. The following year, I had to pay NY state and NYC taxes. You are required to pay taxes to NY not NJ if you work in NY. My principal made the corrections when NYS came after me.

Posted on: 2015/1/30 22:02
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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This guy explains it better than I would, so I am doing a cut n paste.




http://wanderingtaxpro.blogspot.com/2 ... axes-for-nj-resident.html

My husband and I recently moved to Millburn NJ. I will be working in NJ while he will work in NYC. We are unsure how NJ and NY state taxes are applied. Does he have to pay state taxes in both states? How does this affect our federal return - do we file jointly or individually?

I have heard of "double tax" for people living in NJ and working in NY, but can't seem to determine whether it is the truth or a tax myth. Thanks for any light you can shed on this subject. I hope this fits into the criteria of the type of question you will answer.

Thanks,

Erin

A. A good question, Erin. And one that applies to many NJ taxpayers.

First, if you must live in New Jersey at least you have chosen a nice, albeit expensive, place to live. I worked for many years in nearby Summit. One suggestion – go to Route 22 to buy gas for your car.

The basic answer is that you will not be “double-taxed”. You will receive a credit on the NJ return for the state income tax you pay to NY on your husband’s wages. However, as with anything involving taxes, it ain’t quite that simple.

If you live in one state (New Jersey) and work in another (New York) you must first pay state income tax to the state in which you work (New York) on the wages earned in that state. The non-resident state (New York) will not directly (see below) tax you on your other income (i.e. NJ wages and self-employment earnings, interest, dividends, capital gains, etc.).

The state where you live (New Jersey) will tax you on all of your taxable income from all sources, including wages earned in another state (New York). Your resident state (New Jersey) will allow you to claim a credit for any non-resident state income tax paid to another state (New York) on income taxed by both states.

Your husband will have New York state income tax withheld from his wages. He will probably not have New Jersey state income tax withheld.

He will have to file a New York State Form IT-203 – Nonresident and Part Year Resident Income Tax Return. The way this works is that first you calculate the NY state income tax liability as if you were a full-year NY resident – reporting all income for the year that is taxable to a NY resident and claiming all deductions for the year allowed for a NY resident. You then divide your New York State Adjusted Gross Income from New York State sources (in this case the wages earned from your husband’s employment in NY) by your New York State Adjusted Gross Income from all sources (as if you were a full-year resident) – and multiply the result by the NY state income tax liability you had initially calculated as if you were a full-year resident.

Posted on: 2015/1/30 21:58
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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Mine does NOT include NJ W2 (and hasn't for the eight years that I've worked there). Can't recall what my previous NY-based job did.

I know my NJ state wages end up being way higher than NY or federal, because NJ does not treat 403b contributions as pre-tax.

Posted on: 2015/1/30 21:40
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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Wow, I have always received NJ W2.... for me...

The difference is FED Line 16 State Wage is $0 . . NJ W2 has a larger $$$ than NY W2 . . .

Line 17 for NJ W2 is $0 whereas FED and NY W2 has the same $$$ amount.

Otherwise wages and Line 2 are same for all three W2's !

Posted on: 2015/1/30 21:14
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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I work in NY and I've never received a W2 from my employer - I just get the Federal which indicates NY taxes with held. I just fill out the standard form that is mailed each year from NJ.

Posted on: 2015/1/30 20:47
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Re: NJ W2 Tax Question
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DouglasReynholm wrote:
Spouse did not receive a NJ W2 from employer, only the FED and NY State. Employer says they don't provide NJ W2. I work in NY too, but my employer ALWAYS provides a NJ W2 which I file with taxes. Commentary? ? ?

Also, any reputable respected and reliable tax consultants out there ?

Thanks everyone

I am not a tax consultant, but I don't recall getting a NJ W2 from my job.

Posted on: 2015/1/30 20:47
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Spouse did not receive a NJ W2 from employer, only the FED and NY State. Employer says they don't provide NJ W2. I work in NY too, but my employer ALWAYS provides a NJ W2 which I file with taxes. Commentary? ? ?

Also, any reputable respected and reliable tax consultants out there ?

Thanks everyone

Posted on: 2015/1/30 20:42
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