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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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matt07302 wrote:
I don't think pushing up the price of a parking permit will lower the demand for them. It will simply be another fee going to a dysfunctional agency. The point of the permit is to make sure only people eligible for a permit get one. Bumping the fee will not reduce the amount issued, it's just another tax.

The parking authority could make a killing if they simply enforced parking rules. Not to mention make the crosswalks safer. They don't even check the permits when they roll down the streets. They should at least use different colors for the zones and year issued.


Funny, because if you ask Alastor, he seems to be of the mind that pushing up the price will result in a commodified privilege that only the very rich could afford. By his logic, a fee of anything higher than that the current $15 would be an imposition on the citizens of JC that happen to own a car (which itself means they already have to pay for insurance, registration, gas, etc.) I will say it again: $100 / year works out to 30 cents per day. If you can't afford that, you have no business owning a car, which itself will require much more in expenditures.

As for your other point, you are 100% correct. The complete and total lack of enforcement is baffling. The city would rake in thousands of dollars daily if they were to start ticketing people for, among other things, violating the time limits on zoned areas, cars parked in zones without permits, cars parked too close to corners, cars parked in prohibited areas, and cars parked while blocking sidewalks and crosswalks. When I am in DTJC walking around, I see at least 5 to 10 cars every time (all within a few blocks) that are parked in such a way as to warrant a ticket.

Posted on: 2015/6/10 12:34
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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I don't think pushing up the price of a parking permit will lower the demand for them. It will simply be another fee going to a dysfunctional agency. The point of the permit is to make sure only people eligible for a permit get one. Bumping the fee will not reduce the amount issued, it's just another tax.

The parking authority could make a killing if they simply enforced parking rules. Not to mention make the crosswalks safer. They don't even check the permits when they roll down the streets. They should at least use different colors for the zones and year issued.

Posted on: 2015/6/10 4:04
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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bodhipooh wrote:

A lot of fancy words and high falutin logic to try and reframe my words. I never advocated for exclusions, or a privilege for the few. Quite the opposite. But, if you want to avail yourself of a privilege such as parking, you should expect to pay a reasonable amount. If you think $15 is enough, then you and I have nowhere to go in this discussion. I feel that anything less than $100 for a residential parking permit is too low. That's like paying 30 cents per day. If you want to claim that is some sort of imposition that would somehow only make it so that rich people can park on the streets, then go right ahead.


Retirees, working poor, disabled on benefits, unemployed don't need cars ... welcome to bodhipooh world of user-pays and those that can't, can simply do without. Maybe we need yet another tax for parking rights!
With that logic Rhode Island and even parts of Paulus Hook should have parking scaled so high to keep out the riff raff like hipooh from parking there!


More silly deflection... Anyone arguing that someone can afford to drive and own a car, but can't afford to pay $100 / year to park, is making a silly argument. It works out to less than 30 cents per day!! Get real.

Posted on: 2015/6/10 2:57
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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bodhipooh wrote:

A lot of fancy words and high falutin logic to try and reframe my words. I never advocated for exclusions, or a privilege for the few. Quite the opposite. But, if you want to avail yourself of a privilege such as parking, you should expect to pay a reasonable amount. If you think $15 is enough, then you and I have nowhere to go in this discussion. I feel that anything less than $100 for a residential parking permit is too low. That's like paying 30 cents per day. If you want to claim that is some sort of imposition that would somehow only make it so that rich people can park on the streets, then go right ahead.


Retirees, working poor, disabled on benefits, unemployed don't need cars ... welcome to bodhipooh world of user-pays and those that can't, can simply do without. Maybe we need yet another tax for parking rights!
With that logic Rhode Island and even parts of Paulus Hook should have parking scaled so high to keep out the riff raff like hipooh from parking there!

Posted on: 2015/6/10 1:12
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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jklm wrote:
How much of Jersey City has zone permit parking? Mostly downtown, correct?


There's quite a lot in other areas too.

http://www.jcparking.org/pdf/zone%20permits%20all%20zones.pdf

Posted on: 2015/6/10 0:56
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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How much of Jersey City has zone permit parking? Mostly downtown, correct?


Posted on: 2015/6/9 23:16
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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The $15 annual parking fee is insane and must change. It incentivizes private car ownership and driving, which is directly at cross purposes with a slew of worthy city, state, and federal initiatives to promote safer and greener transportation options.

The point about hardship to low-income families is fair; it can be addressed with reduced rates for those residents.

It also wouldn't be reasonable to suddenly jack up the rates to hundreds of dollars a year. That's all the more reason the city needs to start raising the rate very gradually, and indicate its intention to keep doing so over the years. Raising the rate to $30 next year, $50 a few years later, isn't going to send middle-class people to the poorhouse or make parking some kind of rich man's playground. It's the cost of one freaking tire.

Take every penny raised and put it toward bike and pedestrian access and safety. Toward mass transit options that help low-income residents (the new bus shelters are a nice recent example). Heck, put some toward filling potholes, which affect both cars and some alternative transportation.

Meanwhile, while not suddenly hammering current resident car owners with fees, you will begin persuading and signalling more and more incoming residents to arrive without cars, or at least to go light on them (one car for a household that might have bought two). Which is ultimately the best way to maintain some access to street parking for those most in need of it.


Posted on: 2015/6/9 22:37
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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brewster wrote:
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alastor wrote:
If we extend your logic further, we can imagine that for the right amount of money a resident should be able to purchase the privilege to have a permanent parking spot on the public street.


Isn't that just what the city did down on Columbus etc with the "reserved" permit only spots? Those piss me off every time i need to go to 30 Montgomery, and it's inconvenient to bike for some reason like snow.



Those spots on Columbus are super weird and annoying, and they are among the most "protected" spots in all of JC. I always see cars getting ticketed and booted along Columbus. If the JCPA would put half that effort into ticketing scofflaws ignoring the residential parking zone limits, and those that routinely park too close to curbs, etc, we would have a nice budget bump.

Posted on: 2015/6/9 20:28
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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bodhipooh wrote:
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alastor wrote:
@jc_dweller

Nobody driving a registered vehicle is benefiting from "free parking." Moreover, no vehicle owner with a JCPA permit is benefiting from "free parking." In addition to the permit fee, the resident pays either property tax or rent that goes to property tax in addition to the other state and local taxes--all of which pay for the PUBLIC roads. By suggesting that permits should be several hundred dollars, you're arguing that a resident's ability to park a vehicle on a public street should be a privilege reserved for the rich at the expense of everyone who pays taxes relative to their income. In other words, you're suggesting low-income residents should pay taxes so that high-income people can park on the public streets everyone funds. Furthermore, you're ignoring the importance of vehicles to low-income families who cannot afford private parking and need transportation to commute to work. Frankly, I don't understand why someone would be annoyed with concerns about how residents access transportation and the livability of their city. How about we behave like citizens in a democracy and advocate for a solution that has equality in mind such as 24-hour permit restrictions that will benefit all Jersey City residents regardless of their class?


I see... so you are not OK with being asked to pay (what you consider to be) more taxes in the form of a more expensive parking permit (because, at $15 / year, you feel you already pay enough for parking on public roads) but you are totally fine with other people paying more taxes to subsidize your CHOICE. You (irrationally) claim that you paying more in parking permits favors the rich (still not sure how you made that connection) but you fail to realize or acknowledge that most of the taxes already paid are helping to maintain roads for traffic and transit purposes, nor parking. Simply put, parking on city streets is a privilege, and at $15 per year, it is undervalued and undercharged. It doesn't make ANY SENSE to charge that little.


Your reasoning is circular: parking is a privilege because you say it's a privilege. What exactly does that even mean? By this definition nearly every public service--including the very idea of liberty itself--is a privilege that answers to the social contract. Of course, there is a social contract, but the question regards how we should best balance the needs of the individual with the needs of others. I'm assuming you want to emphasize the word privilege to underline your claim that parking a car on a public street is a "CHOICE." Yes, indeed. So is walking on the sidewalk, camping at the national park, riding on NJ transit, and voting. I imagine you'd argue that parking on the street is different from walking down the sidewalk and more akin to riding on the train? Let's accept that premise--that parking, like the train, is a service we should pay for. The next question is why and then, how much? Of course, the ability to pay varies considerably based on personal wealth (I'm sure this principle doesn't require further elaboration). By creating a serious financial burden for low-income residents to park their cars, you are privileging people who have the means to pay over those who do not. This is bad public policy, and it creates a privilege that is a function of wealth, which you obfuscate by making this a matter of "choice." Public services--such as parking on a public street-- need to be accessible to the public and not the privileged few. What you seem to want is a type of exclusion that effectively privatizes a public street. If we extend your logic further, we can imagine that for the right amount of money a resident should be able to purchase the privilege to have a permanent parking spot on the public street. I suggest you check your privilege and direct your thinking to how we can make the city more equitable, more accessible, and more livable--rather than more divided, more isolated, and more inaccessible. Obviously, residents have a reasonable need for parking over the needs of non-residents; let's focus our energies on how to make parking accessible for ALL residents.


A lot of fancy words and high falutin logic to try and reframe my words. I never advocated for exclusions, or a privilege for the few. Quite the opposite. But, if you want to avail yourself of a privilege such as parking, you should expect to pay a reasonable amount. If you think $15 is enough, then you and I have nowhere to go in this discussion. I feel that anything less than $100 for a residential parking permit is too low. That's like paying 30 cents per day. If you want to claim that is some sort of imposition that would somehow only make it so that rich people can park on the streets, then go right ahead.

Posted on: 2015/6/9 20:26
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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alastor wrote:
If we extend your logic further, we can imagine that for the right amount of money a resident should be able to purchase the privilege to have a permanent parking spot on the public street.


Isn't that just what the city did down on Columbus etc with the "reserved" permit only spots? Those piss me off every time i need to go to 30 Montgomery, and it's inconvenient to bike for some reason like snow.


Posted on: 2015/6/9 20:15
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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Instead of complaining about the postal trucks taking up space why not do something about all those cars with "official business city of jersey city" placards that takes up meter parking on Montgomery.



Posted on: 2015/6/9 18:18
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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alastor wrote:
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bodhipooh wrote:
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alastor wrote:
@jc_dweller

Nobody driving a registered vehicle is benefiting from "free parking." Moreover, no vehicle owner with a JCPA permit is benefiting from "free parking." In addition to the permit fee, the resident pays either property tax or rent that goes to property tax in addition to the other state and local taxes--all of which pay for the PUBLIC roads. By suggesting that permits should be several hundred dollars, you're arguing that a resident's ability to park a vehicle on a public street should be a privilege reserved for the rich at the expense of everyone who pays taxes relative to their income. In other words, you're suggesting low-income residents should pay taxes so that high-income people can park on the public streets everyone funds. Furthermore, you're ignoring the importance of vehicles to low-income families who cannot afford private parking and need transportation to commute to work. Frankly, I don't understand why someone would be annoyed with concerns about how residents access transportation and the livability of their city. How about we behave like citizens in a democracy and advocate for a solution that has equality in mind such as 24-hour permit restrictions that will benefit all Jersey City residents regardless of their class?


I see... so you are not OK with being asked to pay (what you consider to be) more taxes in the form of a more expensive parking permit (because, at $15 / year, you feel you already pay enough for parking on public roads) but you are totally fine with other people paying more taxes to subsidize your CHOICE. You (irrationally) claim that you paying more in parking permits favors the rich (still not sure how you made that connection) but you fail to realize or acknowledge that most of the taxes already paid are helping to maintain roads for traffic and transit purposes, nor parking. Simply put, parking on city streets is a privilege, and at $15 per year, it is undervalued and undercharged. It doesn't make ANY SENSE to charge that little.


Your reasoning is circular: parking is a privilege because you say it's a privilege. What exactly does that even mean? By this definition nearly every public service--including the very idea of liberty itself--is a privilege that answers to the social contract. Of course, there is a social contract, but the question regards how we should best balance the needs of the individual with the needs of others. I'm assuming you want to emphasize the word privilege to underline your claim that parking a car on a public street is a "CHOICE." Yes, indeed. So is walking on the sidewalk, camping at the national park, riding on NJ transit, and voting. I imagine you'd argue that parking on the street is different from walking down the sidewalk and more akin to riding on the train? Let's accept that premise--that parking, like the train, is a service we should pay for. The next question is why and then, how much? Of course, the ability to pay varies considerably based on personal wealth (I'm sure this principle doesn't require further elaboration). By creating a serious financial burden for low-income residents to park their cars, you are privileging people who have the means to pay over those who do not. This is bad public policy, and it creates a privilege that is a function of wealth, which you obfuscate by making this a matter of "choice." Public services--such as parking on a public street-- need to be accessible to the public and not the privileged few. What you seem to want is a type of exclusion that effectively privatizes a public street. If we extend your logic further, we can imagine that for the right amount of money a resident should be able to purchase the privilege to have a permanent parking spot on the public street. I suggest you check your privilege and direct your thinking to how we can make the city more equitable, more accessible, and more livable--rather than more divided, more isolated, and more inaccessible. Obviously, residents have a reasonable need for parking over the needs of non-residents; let's focus our energies on how to make parking accessible for ALL residents.


This response gets +100.

Posted on: 2015/6/9 15:47
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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bodhipooh wrote:
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alastor wrote:
@jc_dweller

Nobody driving a registered vehicle is benefiting from "free parking." Moreover, no vehicle owner with a JCPA permit is benefiting from "free parking." In addition to the permit fee, the resident pays either property tax or rent that goes to property tax in addition to the other state and local taxes--all of which pay for the PUBLIC roads. By suggesting that permits should be several hundred dollars, you're arguing that a resident's ability to park a vehicle on a public street should be a privilege reserved for the rich at the expense of everyone who pays taxes relative to their income. In other words, you're suggesting low-income residents should pay taxes so that high-income people can park on the public streets everyone funds. Furthermore, you're ignoring the importance of vehicles to low-income families who cannot afford private parking and need transportation to commute to work. Frankly, I don't understand why someone would be annoyed with concerns about how residents access transportation and the livability of their city. How about we behave like citizens in a democracy and advocate for a solution that has equality in mind such as 24-hour permit restrictions that will benefit all Jersey City residents regardless of their class?


I see... so you are not OK with being asked to pay (what you consider to be) more taxes in the form of a more expensive parking permit (because, at $15 / year, you feel you already pay enough for parking on public roads) but you are totally fine with other people paying more taxes to subsidize your CHOICE. You (irrationally) claim that you paying more in parking permits favors the rich (still not sure how you made that connection) but you fail to realize or acknowledge that most of the taxes already paid are helping to maintain roads for traffic and transit purposes, nor parking. Simply put, parking on city streets is a privilege, and at $15 per year, it is undervalued and undercharged. It doesn't make ANY SENSE to charge that little.


Your reasoning is circular: parking is a privilege because you say it's a privilege. What exactly does that even mean? By this definition nearly every public service--including the very idea of liberty itself--is a privilege that answers to the social contract. Of course, there is a social contract, but the question regards how we should best balance the needs of the individual with the needs of others. I'm assuming you want to emphasize the word privilege to underline your claim that parking a car on a public street is a "CHOICE." Yes, indeed. So is walking on the sidewalk, camping at the national park, riding on NJ transit, and voting. I imagine you'd argue that parking on the street is different from walking down the sidewalk and more akin to riding on the train? Let's accept that premise--that parking, like the train, is a service we should pay for. The next question is why and then, how much? Of course, the ability to pay varies considerably based on personal wealth (I'm sure this principle doesn't require further elaboration). By creating a serious financial burden for low-income residents to park their cars, you are privileging people who have the means to pay over those who do not. This is bad public policy, and it creates a privilege that is a function of wealth, which you obfuscate by making this a matter of "choice." Public services--such as parking on a public street-- need to be accessible to the public and not the privileged few. What you seem to want is a type of exclusion that effectively privatizes a public street. If we extend your logic further, we can imagine that for the right amount of money a resident should be able to purchase the privilege to have a permanent parking spot on the public street. I suggest you check your privilege and direct your thinking to how we can make the city more equitable, more accessible, and more livable--rather than more divided, more isolated, and more inaccessible. Obviously, residents have a reasonable need for parking over the needs of non-residents; let's focus our energies on how to make parking accessible for ALL residents.

Posted on: 2015/6/9 15:40
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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alastor wrote:
@jc_dweller

Nobody driving a registered vehicle is benefiting from "free parking." Moreover, no vehicle owner with a JCPA permit is benefiting from "free parking." In addition to the permit fee, the resident pays either property tax or rent that goes to property tax in addition to the other state and local taxes--all of which pay for the PUBLIC roads. By suggesting that permits should be several hundred dollars, you're arguing that a resident's ability to park a vehicle on a public street should be a privilege reserved for the rich at the expense of everyone who pays taxes relative to their income. In other words, you're suggesting low-income residents should pay taxes so that high-income people can park on the public streets everyone funds. Furthermore, you're ignoring the importance of vehicles to low-income families who cannot afford private parking and need transportation to commute to work. Frankly, I don't understand why someone would be annoyed with concerns about how residents access transportation and the livability of their city. How about we behave like citizens in a democracy and advocate for a solution that has equality in mind such as 24-hour permit restrictions that will benefit all Jersey City residents regardless of their class?


I see... so you are not OK with being asked to pay (what you consider to be) more taxes in the form of a more expensive parking permit (because, at $15 / year, you feel you already pay enough for parking on public roads) but you are totally fine with other people paying more taxes to subsidize your CHOICE. You (irrationally) claim that you paying more in parking permits favors the rich (still not sure how you made that connection) but you fail to realize or acknowledge that most of the taxes already paid are helping to maintain roads for traffic and transit purposes, nor parking. Simply put, parking on city streets is a privilege, and at $15 per year, it is undervalued and undercharged. It doesn't make ANY SENSE to charge that little.

Posted on: 2015/6/9 15:02
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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@jc_dweller

Nobody driving a registered vehicle is benefiting from "free parking." Moreover, no vehicle owner with a JCPA permit is benefiting from "free parking." In addition to the permit fee, the resident pays either property tax or rent that goes to property tax in addition to the other state and local taxes--all of which pay for the PUBLIC roads. By suggesting that permits should be several hundred dollars, you're arguing that a resident's ability to park a vehicle on a public street should be a privilege reserved for the rich at the expense of everyone who pays taxes relative to their income. In other words, you're suggesting low-income residents should pay taxes so that high-income people can park on the public streets everyone funds. Furthermore, you're ignoring the importance of vehicles to low-income families who cannot afford private parking and need transportation to commute to work. Frankly, I don't understand why someone would be annoyed with concerns about how residents access transportation and the livability of their city. How about we behave like citizens in a democracy and advocate for a solution that has equality in mind such as 24-hour permit restrictions that will benefit all Jersey City residents regardless of their class?

Posted on: 2015/6/9 14:03
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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fat-ass-bike wrote:
Just another example of poor town planning and high density high-rise apartment complexes - The de-centralisation of the city would have been the way to go, but then the cost of the infrastructure eats into profit margins for developers, thus throwing a few 100K to politicians is much cheaper to swamp city infrastructure via planning zone changes in their favor!


lulwut? this would happen with high rises or not.


Ignore FAB. Lately, he has become the Yvonne of high rises. In his mind, there is ONE issue that merits attention and, once addressed, all other social ills will be magically solved. Those two are the 21st century version of the village idiot, babbling about threats and evils that mostly exist in their own minds.

Posted on: 2015/6/9 1:10
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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fat-ass-bike wrote:
Just another example of poor town planning and high density high-rise apartment complexes - The de-centralisation of the city would have been the way to go, but then the cost of the infrastructure eats into profit margins for developers, thus throwing a few 100K to politicians is much cheaper to swamp city infrastructure via planning zone changes in their favor!


lulwut? this would happen with high rises or not.

Posted on: 2015/6/9 0:49
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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Just another example of poor town planning and high density high-rise apartment complexes - The de-centralisation of the city would have been the way to go, but then the cost of the infrastructure eats into profit margins for developers, thus throwing a few 100K to politicians is much cheaper to swamp city infrastructure via planning zone changes in their favor!

Posted on: 2015/6/9 0:19
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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So, how do I get my name on the council agenda?


Easy, just call the City Clerk's Office & ask to be put on the speakers list. Do this no later than the Monday before a Wednesday meeting. I want to say the number is 201-547-5150 but if I'm in error, dial the main number, 201-547-5000, & ask for the City Clerk.

Posted on: 2015/6/8 22:46
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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A previous reply of mine seems to have gotten lost.

First, to jc_dweller: thanks for the civil response! I actually agree with everything you said: we definitely shouldn't allow the system to dysfunction any more than it already does. And, the current permit rates should be updated immediately. It is downright RIDICULOUS that the cost of an annual permit is only $15. It should be no less than $100, and even that seems low in the context of what you get in exchange: free parking all over your immediate area.

As for the trucks and their taking up meter spots, I agree that they can become a nuisance. On more than one occasion, I have gone to the post office to do something quick (like mail a package, or pick up some stamps) and spots can be hard to find as some of them are taken over by trucks. My point about the USPS having "immunity" is that the city would do much better to engage with the branch manager and regional postmaster to address the issue and to try and work out an arrangement that actually helps the city and neighbors. Perhaps the city can help locate an area elsewhere where trucks could be parked until they are needed. IIRC, the stretch of Washington immediately south of York is a NO PARKING ZONE. Maybe the city can work with the branch manager to have trucks parked there, for a few hours at a time, so they don't impact the neighbors of York and Washington.

Posted on: 2015/6/8 20:29
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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ChaChaWoo wrote:
Appreciate the feedback, but these spots that the mail trucks are taking is not free parking. It is metered parking, and it is made so intentionally, so that people can pull up, access the post office, and then be on their way. But when the trucks begin to park outside around noon, this becomes much harder to do.


Exactly. The meters are there for PO patrons not for the trucks to hog. Not that Yvonne should think I agree with her idea of a car centric JC, but there should be some effort to allow driving customers access to businesses. The one that really gets me is the Fedex office at Exchange Pl. There used to be angled metered parking there at the foot of Columbus till 9/11, now it's apparently for anyone with parking immunity. Sometimes you really need to go to the office, and carrying cargo makes walking impractical even if you don't mind the distance.

Posted on: 2015/6/8 20:28
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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Appreciate the feedback, but these spots that the mail trucks are taking is not free parking. It is metered parking, and it is made so intentionally, so that people can pull up, access the post office, and then be on their way. But when the trucks begin to park outside around noon, this becomes much harder to do.

Also, though the Warren and York building does indeed have garage parking, people that live there often park outside over night if they are getting home late and leaving early or for less than 2 hours at a time. I don't blame them, as it is much easier to pull up there than it is to drive the loops around the garage.

But yea, I get it, we live in a city, and parking isn't necessarily going to be cheap or easy. I'm just saying that it would be nice if the government did what it could to work with us rather than against us.


So, how do I get my name on the council agenda?

Posted on: 2015/6/8 18:57
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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bodhipooh wrote:
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ChaChaWoo wrote:
I live across the street from the Washington Street Post Office. Recently, I?ve noticed that the mail trucks are taking up a significant amount of the parking spots outside.

Compound these missing parking spots with the fact that 2 new residential buildings (one very large) were recently constructed on York street leading up to Washington, we are now struggling to find any parking at all.

There is a story that mirrors what is going on here in NYC: http://nypost.com/2014/04/01/postal-t ... ing-spots-in-murray-hill/

I emailed our councilwomen. She was very responsive and already had the issue on her radar. But, because the USPS is federal agency the courts throw out tickets when we have written them. They've tried writing the post master general and even reached out to a town in Colorado that was suing their post office for similar infractions and unwillingness to resolve to see what lessons they learned.

Until we get some responses, the best angle we have is photos of them blocking ADA crosswalks. If anyone happens to see a post truck doing this, please snap a picture and email it to our council lady in Ward E or post the picture here.




Not to discount your grievance, but it is very interesting/telling that most of the JCLIST threads can be reduced to some local bemoaning the lack of free parking on public roads.

The building recently built on York (Warren at York) has a garage (and, so does The Gotham) so none of their residents are able to get resident parking permits. As such, they shouldn't be taking up street parking spots.

The USPS has "immunity" from local ordinances and ticketing for very good historical reasons. Some places will actually ticket USPS trucks, but it is an exercise in futility, as the USPS will not pay the ticket, and they can not be forced to do so.


I concur that the bemoaning is largely about lack of free parking, and generally I say "suck it" and those complainers can move to suburbia or a building with a garage. There's no rule that says you get convenient, much less ANY, parking.

That said, we shouldn't let the existing system dysfunction. Meaning, immunity from the rules is a problem. yes, we have limited parking and that's a fact of life, but compounding the problem isn't serving anyone. Similarly, you may see that I posted some time back that we need 24-hour permits - not because I think we need free and convenient parking but because it's just not functioning the way it is now. (And as evidence that I don't think the street parking should be free, I would absolutely advocate for a several-hundred-dollar permit rather than the few-bucks that it costs now.)

Posted on: 2015/6/8 15:05
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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I have been to the city council many times to speak on the lack of parking for residents. In fact the city council gave a parking lot for development that the courts and residents previously used in the Journal Square area. One new building downtown is being constructed without parking at all. Essentially, this administration (except Boggiano and Yun) is against parking for residents. My suggestion is to place your name on the council agenda. If you don't speak up more parking spaces will disappear.

Posted on: 2015/6/8 14:56
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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Gotta get them towed if they're blocking something.

Posted on: 2015/6/8 14:48
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Re: Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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Quote:

ChaChaWoo wrote:
I live across the street from the Washington Street Post Office. Recently, I?ve noticed that the mail trucks are taking up a significant amount of the parking spots outside.

Compound these missing parking spots with the fact that 2 new residential buildings (one very large) were recently constructed on York street leading up to Washington, we are now struggling to find any parking at all.

There is a story that mirrors what is going on here in NYC: http://nypost.com/2014/04/01/postal-t ... ing-spots-in-murray-hill/

I emailed our councilwomen. She was very responsive and already had the issue on her radar. But, because the USPS is federal agency the courts throw out tickets when we have written them. They've tried writing the post master general and even reached out to a town in Colorado that was suing their post office for similar infractions and unwillingness to resolve to see what lessons they learned.

Until we get some responses, the best angle we have is photos of them blocking ADA crosswalks. If anyone happens to see a post truck doing this, please snap a picture and email it to our council lady in Ward E or post the picture here.




Not to discount your grievance, but it is very interesting/telling that most of the JCLIST threads can be reduced to some local bemoaning the lack of free parking on public roads.

The building recently built on York (Warren at York) has a garage (and, so does The Gotham) so none of their residents are able to get resident parking permits. As such, they shouldn't be taking up street parking spots.

The USPS has "immunity" from local ordinances and ticketing for very good historical reasons. Some places will actually ticket USPS trucks, but it is an exercise in futility, as the USPS will not pay the ticket, and they can not be forced to do so.

Posted on: 2015/6/8 14:45
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Mail Trucks Hogging Parking
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I live across the street from the Washington Street Post Office. Recently, I?ve noticed that the mail trucks are taking up a significant amount of the parking spots outside.

Compound these missing parking spots with the fact that 2 new residential buildings (one very large) were recently constructed on York street leading up to Washington, we are now struggling to find any parking at all.

There is a story that mirrors what is going on here in NYC: http://nypost.com/2014/04/01/postal-t ... ing-spots-in-murray-hill/

I emailed our councilwomen. She was very responsive and already had the issue on her radar. But, because the USPS is federal agency the courts throw out tickets when we have written them. They've tried writing the post master general and even reached out to a town in Colorado that was suing their post office for similar infractions and unwillingness to resolve to see what lessons they learned.

Until we get some responses, the best angle we have is photos of them blocking ADA crosswalks. If anyone happens to see a post truck doing this, please snap a picture and email it to our council lady in Ward E or post the picture here.



Posted on: 2015/6/8 13:47
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