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Re: Community Compstat Presentation November 28, 2007
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BrightMoment wrote: Captain McDonough <jcpdeastdistrict@yahoo.com> to east <jcpdeastdistrict@yahoo.com> date Oct 25, 2007 2:48 PM subject Community Compstat Presentation To whom it may concern, Crime statistics reported by the Jersey Journal on October 15, 2007 were misleading. Please review the Uniform Crime Data statistics reported to the Federal Government by the Jersey City Police Department from 1990 to 2006. If anyone has questions relative to the crime reporting data please attend our first Community Compstat presentation on November 28, 2007 at PS 4 on Bright St at 7PM. In the interim click on the JCPD web site for an updated crime report at http://www.njjcpd.org/ Regards, Captain Brian McDonough East District Commander on our JCPD web site to which depicts for a detailed analyis as it relates Message from the Chief & the Director about Crime Statistics (Comparative Stats & Graphics Included) .Please take time to review a message from Chief Commey and Director Jefferson on the JCPD web site as it depicts a 16 year time line. relates to Uniform Crime Reports Jersey City Crime Statistics over a (Comparative Stats & Graphics Included)
A few observations. The numbers plotted from 1990 show a huge drop in crime overall and in almost every category. That's to be applauded. Also, 2007 appears to be an improvement over 2006. Again that's good news. Over recent years, the drop in crime isn't quite so strong: violent crime, particularly robberies and murders seem to be on the increase since 2000, though non-violent crime is trending down. On the last graph, I'm not sure you meant to plot the number of arrests 2007 vs 2006, which shows fewer arrests in 2007. If you plot the number of crimes 2007 vs 2006, there's a strong comparative performance in the first 4 months, but looks like we're back to 2006 levels in recent months. I think most people are weary of the debate on statistics. I personally would like to hear more on proposals to improve policing, and in particular those that increase the deterrance of crime and improve the visibility of the police on our streets.

Posted on: 2007/10/26 10:54
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Re: Community Compstat Presentation November 28, 2007
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From Bright Momments repost...

Captain McDonough wrote:

To whom it may concern,

Crime statistics reported by the Jersey Journal on
October 15, 2007 were misleading. Please review the
Uniform Crime Data statistics reported to the Federal
Government by the Jersey City Police Department from
1990 to 2006...


The Jersey Journal from Oct. 25th
-----------------------------------------------------

Crime falls from 2005 to 2006

Thursday, October 25, 2007
By KEN THORBOURNE
JERSEY JOURNAL

Crime is mostly on the run in Hudson County, though with some key exceptions, according to figures released yesterday by the state Attorney General's Office.

Led by steep drops in Jersey City, particularly in the area of murders and other violent crimes, the analysis, known as the Uniform Crime Report, represents mostly good news.

The report, based on information supplied by local law enforcement agencies, compares 2005 and 2006 crime figures.

According to the report, murders were down 31 percent in the county in 2006, robberies sank 2 percent and aggravated assaults fell by 6 percent. Overall, violent crime dropped by 4 percent - 4,438 incidents in 2005 compared to 4,221 in 2006.

But the news wasn't all rosy. Violent crime in Union City was up 25 percent and arson in the county shot up by 32 incidents.

In Jersey City, violent crime fell 8 percent. Murders in the state's second largest city dropped 42 percent - 38 murders in 2005 versus 22 in 2006. Newark, by way of comparison, recorded 107 murders in 2006.

"These statistics speak for themselves," said Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy, who has hired 200 police officers since taking office three years ago. "The leadership of the Jersey City Police Department and the men and women in uniform . are the best."

So far this year, Jersey City has recorded 14 homicides, said Police Chief Tom Comey.

Rapes in Jersey City were up by 40 percent in 2006 - 60 incidents versus 43 in 2005. Some incidents will turn out not be rapes by the time the Hudson County Prosecutor's Office reviews the case, Comey noted.

Bayonne fared well in the report, but yesterday Police Chief Robert Kubert said this year's figures are running even with last year.

"There's been some recent problems with car burglaries . and residential and business burglaries," Kubert said. "I've been watching it and we are addressing it with additional personnel and tactics."

Hoboken is experiencing a spike in violent crime, said Hoboken Police Chief Carmen V. LaBruno.

From January to the end of August, Hoboken recorded 104 violent crimes, while during the same stretch last year, the city had only 72 violent crimes, LaBruno said.

"Crime is cyclical," he said. "We are also down 25 to 30 officers and the city's population keeps growing."

Crime rates in West New York were fairly steady, though aggravated assaults increased dramatically - by 37 percent.

West New York Police Director Oscar Fernandez, who took the reins in March, said his department can't make an impact on crimes of passion but has made an impact in the most common crimes - robberies, burglaries and stolen vehicles.

"I see a difference in the streets." he said.

In North Bergen, violent crimes declined slightly and nonviolent ones fell by 30 percent.

Mayor Nicholas Sacco credited creation of a plainclothes street crime unit and the use of COMSTAT, a computer system that tracks where crimes happen.

Journal staff writer Keenan Steiner contributed to this report


Also:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Crime is up in Hoboken but down in Hudson County, led by steep drops in Jersey City
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
( Excerpt from Hoboken Now: )

Hoboken Police Chief Carmen V. LaBruno says violent crime is up in Hoboken, The Jersey Journal reported today. The city's stats are in contrast to the overall county numbers, which, according to figures released yesterday by the state Attorney General's Office, show a decrease in the number of reported crimes from 2005 to 2006.

According to the report, murders were down 31 percent in the county in 2006, robberies sank 2 percent and aggravated assaults fell by 6 percent. Overall, violent crime dropped by 4 percent - 4,438 incidents in 2005 compared to 4,221 in 2006.

Much of the drop is attributable to Jersey City, which saw violent crime drop 8 percent and murders drop 42 percent.

In Hoboken, however, there were 104 violent crimes reported during the first eight months of the year, compared to 72 violent crimes during that stretch last year.

"Crime is cyclical," he said. "We are also down 25 to 30 officers and the city's population keeps growing."

http://www.nj.com/hobokennow

Posted on: 2007/10/26 8:35
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Community Compstat Presentation November 28, 2007
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Captain McDonough <jcpdeastdistrict@yahoo.com> to east <jcpdeastdistrict@yahoo.com> date Oct 25, 2007 2:48 PM subject Community Compstat Presentation To whom it may concern, Crime statistics reported by the Jersey Journal on October 15, 2007 were misleading. Please review the Uniform Crime Data statistics reported to the Federal Government by the Jersey City Police Department from 1990 to 2006. If anyone has questions relative to the crime reporting data please attend our first Community Compstat presentation on November 28, 2007 at PS 4 on Bright St at 7PM. In the interim click on the JCPD web site for an updated crime report at http://www.njjcpd.org/ Regards, Captain Brian McDonough East District Commander on our JCPD web site to which depicts for a detailed analyis as it relates Message from the Chief & the Director about Crime Statistics (Comparative Stats & Graphics Included) .Please take time to review a message from Chief Commey and Director Jefferson on the JCPD web site as it depicts a 16 year time line. relates to Uniform Crime Reports Jersey City Crime Statistics over a (Comparative Stats & Graphics Included)

Posted on: 2007/10/26 6:40
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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TEN violent crimes within one block of police headquarters (or whatever that big-but-seemingly-useless building is on Erie and Bay).

way to go, boys.

Posted on: 2007/10/24 20:21
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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I agree with the lack of police presence lately. I hope it improves soon. Maybe the saying "it gets worse before it gets better" applies... i hope.

Posted on: 2007/10/24 20:12
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Make sure you go to your next neighborhood association meeting and voice your concerns. Representatives from the police and Steve Fulop will probably be there. They need to here about this from you and your neighbors.

Posted on: 2007/10/24 14:10
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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I saw another 'deal' go down today!!! I'm in shock. What are the odds of me seeing that TWICE in a week?????? Downtown just near the Bank of America. I NEVER take money out of that ATM anymore, it's too scary. I also saw two bums in that same block blatantly drinking from a bottle of vodka. I had a friend with me visiting from out of town and I was embarrassed this was my neighborhood, when I pointed to him where the police station was he was in shock. How can these dealers do it right under the noses of the police? Seriously, once again folks, I pay too much tax to feel in danger a block away from the police station. This is getting CRAZY.

Posted on: 2007/10/24 3:55
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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creativeconquests wrote:
I have only lived here since July and I can truthfully tell you the streets in downtown feel more risky than they did just four months ago. More seedy people on the street cat calling me, swapping 'packages'


I'm not sure whether it's really worse or whether I'm just noticing everything more because of JCList. But, anyhow, if well-dressed suits were popping up out of nowhere and mugging people, I would be alarmed, but I don't think I'd be so angry at the JCPD.

In this case, we can see the drug dealers hanging out dealing drugs and we can see the potential muggers and car thieves milling around and organizing youth gangs, and we seem to be in a community that's generally under control enough that the police ought to have time to stop by and harass guys who are up to no good at least once or twice an evening.

Instead, we see the police eating pizza, harassing homeless guys and beating up the civilians who call in for assistance.

Posted on: 2007/10/23 8:59
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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With you there bro. As much as I respect what the JCPD face, we're really short on police presence on the streets. I also hugely respect what ppl like Brightmoment and co. do in the local neighborhood.

Bottom line tho...we need a bigger police presence to deter crime. When the crims mug, burglarize and rob at will within a block or two of the police stations...shows we have a real lack of police on the beat.

Posted on: 2007/10/23 4:18
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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I walked on Newark and Grove on Thursday in the afternoon and saw a drug deal go down on the corner. This was only a few blocks away from the police station.

This is after walking past a police officer who was monitoring a bulldozer digging a hole on my street. I have only lived here since July and I can truthfully tell you the streets in downtown feel more risky than they did just four months ago. More seedy people on the street cat calling me, swapping 'packages' and just mulling around looking up to no good. It seems worse in only 4 months. I didn't think that could be possible. What happened to have us start to go backwards? One thing I can tell you with absolute certainty - in the 4 months I've lived here I have NEVER seen police on foot patrol.

I want to feel safe in my neighborhood. I pay through the nose for taxes and I don't know where they are going. Help me want to stay here.

Posted on: 2007/10/21 12:47
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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I posted that because I think Comey gets it. There's definitely a need for shaking things up. I'm not yet convinced though there is a plan. Neither from the police, nor from the JC council.

I think most people would agree that Comey's comments make sense. More police on the streets. More local policing through precincts. More use of tech on surveillance and communication. The sticking point, as always is funding.

I think what Comey is missing is hard and fast targets to measure progress. If the City commits funds, I think we need to demand and measure a return on our investment.

Also, I think the City might be missing out on places for the funding. For example, why cant new developers be obligated to provide space in high-rises for precinct offices? Doen't that solve part of the "managing office space issue".

Why cant all new public and private buildings be obliged to hook up their CCTV to a central police center? And why cant JC seek federal funds for that? I'm sure there are a chorus of civil libertarian issue on that....but why not at least ask the questions.

Posted on: 2007/10/21 2:05
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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From JJ Saturday
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
By JARRETT RENSHAW
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

more stations, but how will Jersey City pay for it?


Jersey City's top cop wants to expand the department by at least 200 officers, break up the city's district system and re-establish precincts, a move that would create additional stations throughout the city.
Police Chief Tom Comey's wish list, however, remains just that: A wish list.

Not only are there questions about the costs associated with such proposals, it also remains uncertain to many whether they would actually reduce crime or just bloat the city's already ailing budget.

However, Comey says, maintaining the status quo fails to address the city's sweeping demographic changes, as development expands to traditionally industrial strongholds and the population continues to grow.

"We are being asked to take on additional responsibilities with the same amount of resources," Comey said, noting that the department is also required to handle additional responsibilities in a post-9/11 world.

Currently, the police department has 889 officers. Adding 200 more would still place the department behind Newark, which has a higher population and more than 1,300 police officers.

"I wish I could say more cops meant less crime, but I don't know what that really means," said City Councilwoman Viola Richardson, a former police officer. "We have more cops now than we had in a while, and we are still having problems."

As for the financial implications of increasing the department by roughly 22 percent, Richardson said, "I don't know if we can sell that to a public who is already struggling with taxes."

Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy said he supports the notion of adding more officers, pointing to the fact that he has increased the department's overall numbers by roughly 100 officers since coming into office in 2004.

However, he said financial constraints make it hard - if not impossible - to grant his police chief's wishes.

"Of course I would love to do that, but I don't know that we have the money," Healy said.

In addition, Comey says the department's current four-district system is antiquated and he would like to re-establish a precinct system that would put more station houses in the city.

"In order to continue to service the community, we need to redefine our geographic area," Comey says.

Healy said the precinct idea is something that can be discussed, but he is skeptical about the city's ability to purchase property, as well as its ability to operate and manage property.

"I just don't think the city is good at owning property," Healy said.

Richardson is skeptical about the precinct proposal, saying more stations does not necessarily translate to a higher police presence because officers don't say in the stations.

"Officers come to the station, then they leave in a car to go on their shifts, so I am not sure a building means a higher presence," said Richardson.

Downtown Councilman Steve Fulop said, "It's a great idea, but you need to balance great ideas with costs to the taxpayers.

"If I had a choice between more police officers or more buildings, given the budget, I would choose more police officers," he added.

Comey said the department also needs to modernize. He would like to add to the 78 cameras currently in use throughout the city, as well as equip police cars to receive live video feeds from cameras that would give officers eyes on the street before going to a scene of an incident.

Other proposals include creating a central processing unit in the department that would allow officers to quickly process people and get back on the street and increased information about crime prevention and levels on the department's Web site.

Posted on: 2007/10/21 1:43
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Friday, October 19, 2007
By JARRETT RENSHAW
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

FIFTH OF A SERIES

Court ...................................
However, no matter which way they looked at the numbers, they put the district in a positive light. When numbers rose, it meant more arrests. When numbers dropped, it meant better crime prevention.

And that raises questions about the cornerstone of the program: accountability.
.......................


Let me just translate. If crime stats go down, JCPD take credit for cime prevention. If they go up, they take credit for increased arrests. They have ZERO accountability. Meaning they have no targets to hit. They answer only to the mayor that appoints them, and its in theirs and in the majors interests that they look good. They have zero independent external auditing nor do they set target reductions in crime.

No accountability. +200 new police officers in JCPD and zero accountability? How can you lose?

Posted on: 2007/10/20 2:48
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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High-tech tool crunches crime figures so cops can spot trends, target hot spots and act quicker

Friday, October 19, 2007
By JARRETT RENSHAW
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

FIFTH OF A SERIES

Along Summit Avenue, near the Jersey City Municipal Court building, lies one of those geographic oddities: Three of the city's four police districts - East, South and North - all converge at one point.

A string of home burglaries took place there earlier this year, and the burglar unknowingly hit a home in all three districts. In the past, that might have proved fortuitous for the burglar, since the police districts rarely shared lower level street information with one another, police brass said.

But that was before the city reintroduced COMSTAT, a highly acclaimed program used in countless departments across the country that combines computer tracking of crimes and information sharing with public accountability as a way to efficiently deploy police resources.

"We got the guy," Police Chief Tom Comey said. "The districts shared information at our COMSTAT meetings and he was captured. Years ago, that would have never happened. Districts operated in isolation, like they were on an island."

REDEPLOYING RESOURCES

In March 2006, Jersey City revived its COMSTAT program after a computer glitch several years ago wreaked havoc and sunk its previous attempt.

Since then, the department's top-ranking officers have met twice a month to review computer-generated crime statistics and maps, looking for trends and sharing street-level information. The idea is to quickly redeploy resources based on the trends.

For example, police noticed a spike in muggings and robberies near the city's Hudson-Bergen Light Rail stations. They created a task force with officers from all districts to combat the problem, leading to a number of arrests and increased safety around these transportation hubs.

Just recently, a spike in arsons led to an Arson Watch Task Force made up of firefighters and cops. Soon, a 24-year-old Greenville man was charged.

COMSTAT, officials say, has helped reduce crime levels in the city. They cite the latest FBI Uniform Crime Report that shows violent crime dropped 8 percent last year while nonviolent crime dropped by nearly 13 percent.

"It helps us manage crime in the city. It doesn't mean that we will eliminate it, but when we see numbers spike we can now react quickly," said Police Capt. Hugh Donaghue, Comey's chief of staff, who helped implement the current COMSTAT system.

CHANGING THE CULTURE

Beyond that, the COMSTAT program has changed the culture of the department, Comey says.

District commanders know that they will be held accountable for spikes in crime, so they try to get in front of issues before they become a problem. Often, they will reach out to the brass at the Erie Street headquarters for additional resources.

That wasn't always the case.

"People used to feel like they were on the island and they were required to fend for themselves. In the past, if you called the chief's office as a district commander looking for some help, the reply was 'Fix it. Isn't that why I put you there?'" Comey said.

Nationwide, the COMSTAT meetings - fictionalized in the popular HBO series "The Wire" - have become famous for their public dressing down of officers who fail to meet the chief's expectations.

At a recent COMSTAT meeting in Jersey City, though, except for a few minor criticisms from the chief, the gathering sounded much like a men's locker room, with officers exchanging friendly verbal jabs.

During one portion of the meeting, Inspector Robert Kilduff was highlighting crime statistics in the North District. He pointed out that drug incidents were higher than last year, saying the numbers represented more drug arrests. He congratulated the district, then noted that the number of aggravated assaults were down in the district, patting the district on the back for the reduction.

However, no matter which way they looked at the numbers, they put the district in a positive light. When numbers rose, it meant more arrests. When numbers dropped, it meant better crime prevention.

And that raises questions about the cornerstone of the program: accountability.

"We have spent the last year focusing on violent crimes, and we believe we have made some progress, which means that we can focus now on drugs, and that is what Inspector Kilduff was explaining," Comey responded. "But you have to be here every day to understand that."

Posted on: 2007/10/19 10:44
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Great and helpful post from 2nd. A few observations.

Quote:

2nd wrote:
On Crime Being Up Or Down Or All Around ....

.............
I've been aware of police presence, in cars, on bikes, on corners, etc., mostly during the day, and sometimes, at night.


Yep. Me too. Though I see police every day at building sites, shopping areas and places like the Path. I really can't remember the last time I saw a police patrol on my block. I might see a poliice car once a week on my street. Crims see the same lack of presence.

Quote:

I'm not altogether satisfied with a discussion that leaves neighbors with the alternative of either calls for police or political resignations, ad hominem attacks against posters who express their concerns, or neighborhood watch groups being characterized as 'vigilante', which, for better or worse, they, most certainly, are not. Those participating in such groups should be applauded for taking some action. But those deciding not to go that particular route never should be given cause to remain silent about their anxieties of city-life.


Well put. I apologised for my "vigilante" remark...perhaps politically incorrect. I intended the meaning of "self-appointed watchgroup" rather than anything more sinister.

Quote:

I am most concerned about predatory crime.


Most crime is predatory. I think all the crime reported in the COMPUSTATS can be classified as predatory. Which ones arent?

Quote:

And the distance between (1) the debate on compilations of 'reported' crime statistics translating to methods which will increase actual safety and (2) neighbors who want to feel, and actually be safe, from such crime, is a great one, thus far, to cover. Statistics are wonderful to discuss, in the house/senate and in the tower of academia for policy decision-making, but I'm on the ground floor, with most of the rest, and statistical debate means little to one dealing with the aftermath of predation.


As someone also on the ground floor and a personal victim of local "predatory" crime, the statistics mean a lot to me. The statistics also mean a lot to local politicians, City spending and to the value of all our homes.

Quote:

In the meantime, I make NO claims as an expert in forms of martial training, but I did learn, early, that although one, naturally, may not have violent inclinations, one still may be subject to the violent inclinations of others, threatened or otherwise. I hope to convey that individuals, or groups, can take some measures to provide the deterrence or prevention 'factor' that police cannot provide to all, at all times:


I agree on the fact that people should take all personal and legal measures to ensure their own protection and security. I'd like to see the police providing more deterrence. I feel fairly safe walking the streets but I am from an area that is much less safe than JC. My girlfriend doesn't feel safe on the streets on her own, particular evenings.

Quote:

Awareness is key. Eyes open, all the time, scan the periphery. Get to know the neighbors. A smile, a nod, recognizing who resides in the vicinity and who doesn't, for starters. Travel in groups, to and from, if at all possible. No headphones or ipods should be seen, at night. They are common targets for theft, and they prevent your audio sensitivity, which is required when lights are low.

Attempt to walk the routes of high visibility, where lamps are working, even if it's an extra block or two. Be prepared to cross the street to stay in lit areas. Where car traffic is not too congested to make it dangerous, walk the middle of the street. If aware, you can always move laterally, between parked cars, back to the sidewalk. Heels are great, but sneakers are better. Combat boots are best. Sexy, and practical.

Take a cab, if and when you're not feeling safe for the walk home, it's not super-expensive. I've done it from the Grove St. PATH station, for a mere five blocks. Take cards/numbers for cab companies for later reference, when in need.

Have your cell-phone visible, and dialed in to the local dispatch (as I understand - please corrrect me if I'm wrong - 201 547 5477), ready to go. People appear to talk to themselves, via headsets on cellies, all the time. You can do this at night, as well. Also, not a bad measure to make intermittent phone calls to/from a friend's place, to ensure you're timing is correct.

Mace is illegal to purchase/possess in New Jersey, among many other items of potential protective value. OC (oleoresin capsicum), however, is not. Fox Labs, among some circles, is known to be the best. It is not an 'attack-stopper' in close-proximity; It may inhibit sight and cause debilitating sinus inflammation in an attacker. But be prepared to spray and run.


Great advice. I'd add...know where you're going. Know your exits. If you need to ...hit hard, real hard, and move fast. Though I'd recommend don't cross the street to avoid people that have already seen you. Shows you're scared and unprepared. Walk straight through them confidently and look them in the eye. If they mean you harm, they're gonna land on you anyway.

I'd also add it would be great if there were more police foot patrols that followed your advice on awareness, keeping eyes open, getting to know the neighbors , and carrying a big stick. And gun.

Posted on: 2007/10/19 2:55
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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2nd wins the Most Constructive First Post Award, hands down. (And bonus points for use of the word "man-satchel"... <--- unavoidable but good-natured snark).

Posted on: 2007/10/18 21:15
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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On Crime Being Up Or Down Or All Around ....

I've been browsing most of the threads on this site for a number of weeks/months, now .... I have resided, for several years, in an area characterized by the newspaper, most recently, as an area of 'high incidence' in downtown jc. In this time, I've been aware of police presence, in cars, on bikes, on corners, etc., mostly during the day, and sometimes, at night.

In this time, I've also walked the same streets, at day and night, to and from the Newark Ave. area, and I'm sad to hear and read of more and more incidents relayed to me, of vandalism, of theft, of robbery, 2 or more on 1 attacks.

I'm not altogether satisfied with a discussion that leaves neighbors with the alternative of either calls for police or political resignations, ad hominem attacks against posters who express their concerns, or neighborhood watch groups being characterized as 'vigilante', which, for better or worse, they, most certainly, are not. Those participating in such groups should be applauded for taking some action. But those deciding not to go that particular route never should be given cause to remain silent about their anxieties of city-life.

Yes, I understand the distinction between crimes committed and crimes reported. And please understand the limitations of police presence AND their attendant ability to prevent crime before, or during, a predatory attack. I am most concerned about predatory crime. And the distance between (1) the debate on compilations of 'reported' crime statistics translating to methods which will increase actual safety and (2) neighbors who want to feel, and actually be safe, from such crime, is a great one, thus far, to cover. Statistics are wonderful to discuss, in the house/senate and in the tower of academia for policy decision-making, but I'm on the ground floor, with most of the rest, and statistical debate means little to one dealing with the aftermath of predation.

In the meantime, I make NO claims as an expert in forms of martial training, but I did learn, early, that although one, naturally, may not have violent inclinations, one still may be subject to the violent inclinations of others, threatened or otherwise. I hope to convey that individuals, or groups, can take some measures to provide the deterrence or prevention 'factor' that police cannot provide to all, at all times:

Awareness is key. Eyes open, all the time, scan the periphery. Get to know the neighbors. A smile, a nod, recognizing who resides in the vicinity and who doesn't, for starters. Travel in groups, to and from, if at all possible. No headphones or ipods should be seen, at night. They are common targets for theft, and they prevent your audio sensitivity, which is required when lights are low.

Attempt to walk the routes of high visibility, where lamps are working, even if it's an extra block or two. Be prepared to cross the street to stay in lit areas. Where car traffic is not too congested to make it dangerous, walk the middle of the street. If aware, you can always move laterally, between parked cars, back to the sidewalk. Heels are great, but sneakers are better. Combat boots are best. Sexy, and practical.

Take a cab, if and when you're not feeling safe for the walk home, it's not super-expensive. I've done it from the Grove St. PATH station, for a mere five blocks. Take cards/numbers for cab companies for later reference, when in need.

Have your cell-phone visible, and dialed in to the local dispatch (as I understand - please corrrect me if I'm wrong - 201 547 5477), ready to go. People appear to talk to themselves, via headsets on cellies, all the time. You can do this at night, as well. Also, not a bad measure to make intermittent phone calls to/from a friend's place, to ensure you're timing is correct.

Mace is illegal to purchase/possess in New Jersey, among many other items of potential protective value. OC (oleoresin capsicum), however, is not. Fox Labs, among some circles, is known to be the best. It is not an 'attack-stopper' in close-proximity; It may inhibit sight and cause debilitating sinus inflammation in an attacker. But be prepared to spray and run.

If you have a dog, carry a stick. (A suggestion also applied to owners with uncontrollable dogs.) If you do not have a dog, carry a stick. I see many with purses and man-satchels, and a stick fits. These are not illegal in New Jersey, and oftentimes, 12" wooden dowel beats short-knife. (Think poke, not swing.) Be prepared to poke, create distance/damage, and run.

Be prepared to run. And scream loudly and crazily. And flail your arms, while screaming loudly and crazily, and running. There still may be recalcitrant boy scouts in the 'hood, or other good people walking in the vicinity.

I'm aware some of this may be 'old' for some, but 'new' to others. Feel free to ADD to this, or, in a constructive way, provide alternatives. I hope the webmaster will continue to do the same in encouraging constructive dialogue(s), in all respects and for all forum sections. I find that SNARKY CAN BE ANNOYING, and highly inappropriate, particularly in the crime and safety forum section. (Gawkerstalker's plenty for that, and celebrities can take a reasonable amount of sniping from the peanut gallery.) Have a nice day and a safe night



PS .... A question for the Webmaster .... How about a section dedicated to self-help/improvement relating to any of the areas already having forums? There are people who like to comment, and respond to commentary, but, I believe, there are also those who want to learn a little more by asking questions without fear of having to engage the wrath of snark.

Posted on: 2007/10/18 19:24
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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BURGLARY HOT SPOTS

Wednesday, October 17, 2007

Surely, the East District holds no monopoly on burglary and thefts among the city's four districts.

BURGLARY HOT SPOTS

In fact, the mapping of crime statistics shows that an area stretching from Journal Square to McGinley Square and a little bit beyond, along with a small area south of the intersection of Bergen Avenue and Kennedy Boulevard, have higher concentrations of burglaries.

But a group of vocal neighborhood organizations in the East District have repeatedly called public attention to the issues of burglary and theft in their neighborhoods in recent years.

The organized groundswell of public attention has helped make McDonough one of the most active district commanders in the city, personally attending many neighborhood meetings each month, even when there is great chance they'll turn combative.

"I feel it's important to grow the cooperation between the community and the Police Department," McDonough said. "For one thing, it's important that the residents know there are things they can do, like making sure they clear their car of potential targets at night, like satellite radios or GPS systems."

REPORTING FOR DUTY

During a recent afternoon roll call, 14 uniformed cops and two plainclothes officers were present for duty, along with two detectives and several higher-ups scheduled for desk work.

The number of uniformed personnel - all assigned to a car and not to foot patrol - raises questions for some about the level of resources the city is dedicating to patrol a sprawling area that stretches east to west from the Hudson River to Summit Avenue and north to south from the Hoboken border to Liberty State Park.

"That does not seem adequate," Stoia said.

McDonough, though, said he is satisfied with the level of resources, pointing to department numbers that show significant drops in stolen vehicles and burglaries from last year to this year.

"Of course you would always like more people," he said, "but I feel comfortable with what we have."

Posted on: 2007/10/18 9:08
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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WHERE THE DRUG DEALERS RULE
Residents decry drug corners, but cops doubt 'historic' spots can be cleared

Thursday, October 18, 2007
By JARRETT RENSHAW
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

FOURTH OF A SERIES

When "Patty" moved less than a block away from the intersection of Carteret and Randolph avenues in Jersey City earlier this year, she received a very unpleasant welcome. Her husband's prized car was quickly stolen from in front of their house.

"I am now moving out next week. I can't stay here and have my children be exposed to the crackheads and drugs around here," she said. "It's just not right."

Like many others interviewed in the surrounding neighborhoods by The Jersey Journal in recent weeks, "Patty" refused to offer her full name out of fear of retribution from the neighborhood's drug dealers.

The intersection of Carteret and Randolph ranks among the most active of the city's drug corners, according to a Jersey Journal analysis of 19 months of reported crime statistics provided by the city's police department.

The other two intersections with the highest volume of reported drug incidents are Martin Luther King Drive and Myrtle Avenue and King Drive and Oak Street, according to the Journal analysis.

News of the high volume of reported drug activity at these intersections was not a surprise to any of the residents interviewed in recent weeks, nor was it a surprise to many members of the local law enforcement community.

So, how do they continue to thrive?

"These are historical places where people know they can get drugs, and that makes it lucrative enough for dealers to roll the dice and risk getting caught," said Police Inspector Kenneth Teschlog, who heads the department's Investigation Division, which includes narcotics.

"When we focus on an area, we clear it out, and the dealers move down the block. It just disperses the activity," Teschlog said. "Short of being there 24 hours a day, I am not sure we can stop it."

The state needs stiffer penalties for drug dealers, specifically for juveniles, who often become repeat offenders due to "soft" punishment, Teschlog said.

"The money these dealers can make outweighs the punishment, and we are working hard with the FBI to try to get as many of these federal crimes, which carry much higher penalties," Teschlog said.

A business owner near the Carteret and Randolph intersection said the level of drug activity waxes and wanes, but it's always present at some level.

"People drive by. Someone either jumps in the car or leans in the window. It's pretty clear what's going on," the business owner said. "It hurts business because people won't come here at night."

Jiomarys Arce, 22, walks through the Carteret and Randolph intersection almost every day and has grown to accept the level of drug activity as part of living in an urban area.

"I don't feel scared. I feel comfortable around here. There is a house next to mine that is an empty lot and dealers would hide their drugs there, but cops came in and got them out of there, so it was fine," Arce said.

But Arce said that doesn't mean she doesn't sometimes feel threatened.

"One time I was putting out the trash, and a car rolled up and the window rolled down, and I was scared," Arce said. "But the guy only threw his McDonald's trash on the street."

The three intersections lie within the King Drive corridor, a mix of residential and commercial neighborhoods that witness a high volume of drug-related incidents, according to a Star-Ledger mapping of city crime statistics conducted in conjunction with the Journal.

The King Drive corridor was also home to a high volume of the city's violent crimes - aggravated assaults, robberies and homicides - showing the crimes have a symbiotic relationship.

The other areas of the city with high volumes of drug-related incidents have one thing in common: public housing.

The larger of these two areas is the neighborhood that surrounds the Montgomery Gardens complex, while the other is the A. Harry Moore complex, where residents have complained about an open-air drug market along Duncan Avenue, just north of Lincoln Park.

Posted on: 2007/10/18 9:07
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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I would add that can Captain McDonough ask the umpteen people that have been burlarised, assaulted, cars broken into in Downtown JC, and worse, a lot of whom live within a few blocks of your precinct headquarters, whether they are comfortable with the level of policing you are providing?

You're "satisfied" and "comfortable". Is anyone else?

Seriously Capt McDonough. Go to the website below. Follow the link to "visualize incident data for Jersey City". Then put in any address you care - including your precinct addresses. Totallly shameful. Honestly I hope you get this - because I believe your heart is in the right place. Help us with solutions please.

http://www.nj.com/news/bythenumbers/

Posted on: 2007/10/18 5:32
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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From today's JJ ...this explains the huge disconnect between what Downtown residents want, and what Capt McDonough feels is needed. IMO Sam has it right.

Im really awaiting Saturday's issue, and hoping Comey has some positive and constructive suggestions, Looks like McDonough feels hes doing ok at the moment though.

Quote:

From todays JJ...............

"People are very concerned," Sam Stoia, vice president of the Hamilton Park Neighborhood Association, said.

"People feel that we need more of a police presence on the streets, and we are not getting it. The city tries to hold an increase of taxes over our heads, but we are not satisfied with our return on our taxes now. We have sewer and flooding problems, and nothing this city has done has increased our home values."
............
"That does not seem adequate," Stoia said.


Quote:

McDonough, though, said he is satisfied with the level of resources, pointing to department numbers that show significant drops in stolen vehicles and burglaries from last year to this year.

"Of course you would always like more people," he said, "but I feel comfortable with what we have."

Posted on: 2007/10/18 5:26
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Quote:

BrightMoment wrote:

The difference is I don't believe in tortured misreadings, conjectures, hyperbole twisting comments by parsing tea leaves as you and FAB do and by your own statements see yourself in some heroic posturing as "man against the machine"


Hello pot. Meet kettle. Nope - you don't when it comes to the JCPD, but you do when it comes to posters on this website.

Quote:

....assuage their ego here where you won't be challenged by the Captain or the police.

What are you afraid of nugnfutz? Afraid that you might find answers to your questions in person from the Captain?


I'm not an employee of the public. I don't have a right to ask questions of public employees on any forum I choose? Why should I care about the Captain's right to challenge me. He's more than welcome I'm sure to post here or answer in any forum he chooses.


Quote:

Well, once again you've used the phrase "vigilante group" to describe what four women founded out of concerns of crime and safety downtown. MOST of our members are women and NONE of us are vigilantes and your slur is contemptible.


By vigilante group i meant you are a self-appointed watchgroup. Do your thing in any way you like, and I respect the fact that you devote time and energy to improving the neighborhood. I'm sorry you've chosen to see that as a slur - that wasnt my intention. Where I have a problem ...it seems to be your way or the highway. No-one else is allowed to question local policing except through your org. That's what's wrong with your group.

Posted on: 2007/10/17 12:23

Edited by nugnfutz on 2007/10/17 12:55:11
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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I fail to see the correlation between taller buildings and crime being resolved, read:

"The Newark Avenue strip, Downtown Councilman Steven Fulop said, can still be a dangerous place to walk at night, something he wants to change.

"We're trying to make Newark Avenue a place where people can feel comfortable walking all hours of the day. Today it is not," he said, noting that car break-ins are a particular problem his constituents have complained to him about.

He has pushed for a redevelopment plan for the area that would allow taller buildings to be built, which he believes would bring in higher real estate investment, and for streetscape funding to improve lighting, for example."

Why will a redevelopment plan that brings taller buildings solve crime? Unless he plans on bringing spider man in as the solution I see it as him using the article as an opportunity to push another agenda. Taller buildings=higher real estate investment=money in whose pockets? Hmmmmm. Why gentrify downtown - what does that have to do with dealing with crime. It's a stretch.

Posted on: 2007/10/17 6:44
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Quote:

nugnfutz wrote:

Think the difference between you BM, myself and FAB...is that we're questioning the machine and trying to understand the stats and explanations.

I have no problem in "questioning the machine...", nugnfutz, since it was I back in fall of 2005 who first questioned the Captain at a DJCW mtg on the specific breakdown of crime stats for the East District. I posted an analysis of those comp crime stats here back in 2005 which has unfortunately been deleted here by the Webmaster (along with over 80+% of all the content on this site!)during a software upgrade.

The difference is I don't believe in tortured misreadings, conjectures, hyperbole twisting comments by parsing tea leaves as you and FAB do and by your own statements see yourself in some heroic posturing as "man against the machine"

Maybe you should layoff watching Heroes for awhile.


Might be that you're too close to the problem to challenge whats issued in the press.

I'm just one among many volunteers of DJCW, all of us neighbors, the major difference being few of us engage in internet postings preferring to meet face-to-face with their neighbors and the police to ask these questions rather than assuage their ego here where you won't be challenged by the Captain or the police.

What are you afraid of nugnfutz? Afraid that you might find answers to your questions in person from the Captain?


[...]

And you've just illustrated why I have zero interest in joining your vigilante group.

Well, once again you've used the phrase "vigilante group" to describe what four women founded out of concerns of crime and safety downtown. MOST of our members are women and NONE of us are vigilantes and your slur is contemptible.

We actively meet on a monthly basis with the police to discuss current crimes, issues of concern and to organize neighborhood patrols that are used to show a watchful presence by other neighbors in problem areas. If you read the link here for the DJCW it goes into more detail, but nothing about those patrols or our group is as you state.



Posted on: 2007/10/17 4:35
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Oops FAB on re-reading - I thought BM was being a d**khead on this. However, didnt mean it to look like i was answering for you. My apologies.

Posted on: 2007/10/17 3:34
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Quote:

BrightMoment wrote:
Quote:

fat-ass-bike wrote:
Quote:


That bustling activity - transportation and stores, for example - explains some of the high volume of cop calls, Capt. Brian McDonough, commander of the East District, said, noting, too, that the active neighborhood associations in the area also translate to many reports of suspicious activity.



By making that comment, its hard to work out if the Capt. is suggesting that the neighborhood associations are helping the situation or their efforts just 'translate' to many reports.

The comment can been seen as a derogative one!


FAB, the reporter, Jarrett Renshaw, did NOT use quotes but used a journalistic device of "characterizing" what the Captain said and then chooseing as a reporter/writer to only write what Jarret characterised as the Captain "noting":

"...that the active neighborhood associations in the area also translate to many reports of suspicious activity."

From a journalistic POV, your "FAB interpretation" of what Jarret wrote was "noted" by the Captain, is just that, your interpretation.

The article states a fact the reporter says was noted by the Captain: "...active neighborhood associations in the area also translate to many reports of suspicious activity."

Neither the Captain or the writer characterize what was stated as having a derogatory meaning. Only you and nugnfutz do, and perhaps others who don't read closely.

As I previously stated, anyone who has been to any of the 3years of monthly meetings the DJCW has held would know that the Captain has nothing but good things to say about ALL neighborhood groups and particularly the DJCW who the PD monthly reports in detail what transpired with activities in downtown JC.


Think the difference between you BM, myself and FAB...is that we're questioning the machine and trying to understand the stats and explanations. Might be that you're too close to the problem to challenge whats issued in the press. I respect what your personal intentions for the community. I think all 3 of us want to see our community as crime-free. You may not think that I nor FAB have the right to challenge where our tax dollars are spent if we're not personally involved actively in your DJCW or similar org. Sorry ...we have the right to challenge and question any publicly elected or appointed official. I want to know where and how my tax dollars are spent. Anyone that has any investment in this City has the same right. So back off YOUR personal attacks on both of us. Neither FAB nor I are spending your tax dollars or anyone else from JC. If and when we do, then you can hold us accountable.

And you've just illustrated why I have zero interest in joining your vigilante group.

Posted on: 2007/10/17 2:05
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Don't mean to rain on anyone's parade, but truth be told if JC wants to get serious about crime in the BERGEN/Lafayete/MLK section of town which has the highest number of incidents, it has to take a hard look at whats been going on for ages and stop ignoring it and trying to sweep it under the rug.

*Get rid of the projects.
*Get rid of the Entitlement programs.
*Make parents responsible for their childrens actions.
*Focus on education and stop the "BS" with the no child left behind CRAP.
*Enforce the Tax abatment Criteria, i.e. make sure that the developers hire more JC residents.
* Create more TRADE education programs for those students who just don't get it.

Most importantly stop crying about and hanging onto the horrors that took place over 1oo years ago, that was then and this is now, Enough is enough.

CK

Posted on: 2007/10/17 1:35
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Quote:

fat-ass-bike wrote:
Quote:


That bustling activity - transportation and stores, for example - explains some of the high volume of cop calls, Capt. Brian McDonough, commander of the East District, said, noting, too, that the active neighborhood associations in the area also translate to many reports of suspicious activity.



By making that comment, its hard to work out if the Capt. is suggesting that the neighborhood associations are helping the situation or their efforts just 'translate' to many reports.

The comment can been seen as a derogative one!


FAB, the reporter, Jarrett Renshaw, did NOT use quotes but used a journalistic device of "characterizing" what the Captain said and then chooseing as a reporter/writer to only write what Jarret characterised as the Captain "noting":

"...that the active neighborhood associations in the area also translate to many reports of suspicious activity."

From a journalistic POV, your "FAB interpretation" of what Jarret wrote was "noted" by the Captain, is just that, your interpretation.

The article states a fact the reporter says was noted by the Captain: "...active neighborhood associations in the area also translate to many reports of suspicious activity."

Neither the Captain or the writer characterize what was stated as having a derogatory meaning. Only you and nugnfutz do, and perhaps others who don't read closely.

As I previously stated, anyone who has been to any of the 3years of monthly meetings the DJCW has held would know that the Captain has nothing but good things to say about ALL neighborhood groups and particularly the DJCW who the PD monthly reports in detail what transpired with activities in downtown JC.

Posted on: 2007/10/17 0:56
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Quote:

murican wrote:
I think that all parts of Jersey City ESPECIALLY the MLK corridor need more open space, more library branches, more community centers, after school centers, and recreation centers where children, families and teens can safely go to play, study and relax.

Many latch-key children have no properly supervised safe refuge until their parents get home from work. Very few parents can afford to stay at home with their children in this economy.

There, is a sad lack of amenities for families and youth who just want to lead normal, violent-free, crime-free lives.


I think it's a sad reflection of our 2-tier society that areas like MLK exist. I know both the City and the various voluntary agencies seem to doing their best to provide a number of things from the basics like food, clothing, shelter and security, as well as improving the long-term outlook through areas such as education and jobs. Structured lesuire and recreation should definitely be a priority. The challenge seems to be how to attract the inward investment in terms of funding and people's time.

Posted on: 2007/10/16 19:49
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Re: Jersey Journal & Star Ledger: BIG FEATURES ON CRIME & LOCATIONS -- SEE LINKS
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Quote:

From today's Jersey Journal a preview of Saturday's article..........

Saturday: The city's top cop wants to retool the department to meet today's challenges. But the changes would require more money from the city's taxpayers, and it's unclear whether there is the political will to push them through..


Guns that work? More street cameras? Improvements in communications and emergency call filtering? Auxiliary police? Higher taxes? Hopefully we can give credit to Comey for coming forward with proposals: its shows the JCPD at least recognise there is a serious set of issues to tackle.
Looking forward to reading the article.

Quote:

(Also from today's JJ in relation to Ward F......)

In addition, Comey said, the number of "high-priority" calls in the area puts a strain on "limited" police resources. Each of the city's four districts is staffed equally, he said, so when police respond to these calls, it leaves other areas vulnerable and without a police presence.


I'm not sure how to read this alongside McDonough's comment. Seems to indicate that despite the new emergency control center, call filtering and routing is still a huge issue. Maybe we'll get clarification in the Saturday article.

Posted on: 2007/10/16 19:29
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