Register now !    Login  
Main Menu
Who's Online
47 user(s) are online (29 user(s) are browsing Message Forum)

Members: 0
Guests: 47

more...


Forum Index


Board index » All Posts (GrovePath)




Re: World’s Best Golfers to Compete in Jersey City
#1
Home away from home
Home away from home


Is Liberty State Park open? Can you park there?

Posted on: 9/28 18:02
Top


Re: Removal of dying tree
#2
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

AlexC wrote:
Thanks everyone!


Please let us know what quotes you get and what equipment they will have.

Posted on: 9/28 6:32
Top


Re: Anyone missing a white cat with orange & black spots in the Heights?
#3
Home away from home
Home away from home


That is really sad - put some food out.

Posted on: 9/26 19:45
Top


Re: Removal of dying tree
#4
Home away from home
Home away from home



Posted on: 9/26 15:34
Top


Re: Replacing shut off valve on the water main line
#5
Home away from home
Home away from home


You (or your plumber) should just rent one of these.

https://youtu.be/XeNZzaEzeqg

or

https://youtu.be/LmUUtJGIjHI

Posted on: 9/19 11:54
Top


Re: New Amazon HQ
#6
Home away from home
Home away from home


They want top colleges - Princeton is trying but Boston sounds more likely. Though they just built a huge warehouse outside of Cranbury NJ - which is right by Princeton.

Posted on: 9/18 17:53
Top


Re: Hurricane Jose: Rain And Storm Surge Could affect us next Tues &Wed
#7
Home away from home
Home away from home



Posted on: 9/15 16:41
Top


Re: Hurricane Jose: Rain And Storm Surge Could affect us next Tues &Wed
#8
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

tern wrote:
What's the best place to buy jerrycans? Don't want to be caught without gas like those people in Florida.

Fuel vital not only for evacuation by motor-vehicle, but also to run generators at home as power-cuts will be widespread.

Robin.


Also Loews & Home Depot - Sears and auto parts store all sell 5 gallon Plastic Gas Cans.

Posted on: 9/15 14:17
Top


Raised in Greenville: Frank Vincent Of 'Sopranos,' 'Goodfellas' Fame Dies At 80
#9
Home away from home
Home away from home


Resized Image


Frank Vincent Of 'Sopranos,' 'Goodfellas' Fame Dies At 80
New Jersey has lost one of its most beloved wiseguys.

By Eric Kiefer (Patch Staff) - Updated September 14, 2017

NUTLEY, NJ — Frank Vincent Gattuso Jr., a Nutley resident and actor known for his roles on mob-themed pop culture staples as The Sopranos and Goodfellas, has passed away, reports say. He was 80 years old. Gattuso, known professionally as Frank Vincent, died Wednesday, his family stated. No cause of death was provided.

“He was very private; he kept to himself," Nutley Mayor Joseph Scarpelli told NorthJersey.com. "People would see him around town, obviously, and know who he was, but he’s private. We were proud to have him live in Nutley, and he was a great actor — a local guy who made it big."

Vincent’s obituary identifies him as a classic “tough guy actor” who was born in North Adams, Massachusetts, in 1939. He started his acting career in 1976 in the low-budget crime film "The Death Collector" with Joe Pesci, appearing again with Pesci and Robert De Niro in three Martin Scorsese films: "Raging Bull," "Goodfellas" and "Casino." Vincent later played Phil Leotardo, the rival of Tony Soprano on hit television show "The Sopranos."

He’s also the author of a non-fiction book, "A Guy's Guide to Being a Man's Man."

According to his online biography, Vincent was born to first-generation Italian-Americans and raised in the Greenville section of Jersey City.


https://patch.com/new-jersey/hoboken/s ... cle-topstories&utm_slot=1

Posted on: 9/15 8:53
Top


Hurricane Jose: Rain And Storm Surge Could affect us next Tues &Wed
#10
Home away from home
Home away from home


Hurricane Jose: Rain And Storm Surge Could Batter New York City, Forecasters Say

The storm will cause rough seas and possibly rain and gusts next week, forecasters said.

By Adam Nichols (Patch Staff) - Updated September 14, 2017


NEW YORK, NY – After a few nerve-wracking days, hurricane watchers were breathing more easily Thursday – confident that the storm currently churning in the Atlantic will not bring devastating force to the east coast.

But what remains of Hurricane Jose could still come "threateningly close" to New York City, the National Weather Service warned.

If it does, it would be next week and bring rain and wind gusts through Tuesday and Wednesday, though it's unlikely to have the force it's packing now. There's a 5-10 percent chance of tropical storm-force winds, meaning at least 39 mph, the service said.

Jose is now forecast to move north between Bermuda and U.S., weakening as it goes. It will result in rough seas in the New York area, according to AccuWeather.

Jose is currently a tropical storm and about 500 miles north east of the Bahamas. It performed a complicated loop over the last few days, and forecasters had been worried about the path it would take once that maneuver had been completed.

https://patch.com/new-york/new-york-ci ... york-city-forecasters-say

Posted on: 9/14 19:11
Top


Re: New York Times: Is New York’s Best Pizza in New Jersey?
#11
Home away from home
Home away from home


What they all need is to hire someone to stand out front wearing one of these.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/362044949059

Resized Image

Posted on: 9/13 16:17
Top


New York Times: Is New York’s Best Pizza in New Jersey?
#12
Home away from home
Home away from home


Resized Image


Is New York’s Best Pizza in New Jersey?

RAZZA
NYT Critic’s Pick
Pizza $$
275 Grove Street 201-356-9348

Restaurant Review
By PETE WELLS SEPT. 12, 2017
The New York Times

JERSEY CITY — We were on our third pie of the night at Razza, across the street from City Hall here, when Ed Levine stopped chewing long enough to ask me a question:

“Are you going to say that the best pizza in New York is in New Jersey?”

Ed Levine knows what it means to make a strong claim for a pizzeria. The founder of the website Serious Eats and the author of the book “Pizza: A Slice of Heaven,” he caused a stir in 2004 by writing in The New York Times that the pies at Pizzeria Bianco in Phoenix “just might be the best pizza in America.” So when it started to dawn on me, about a year after my first dinner at Razza, that no pizzeria in the five boroughs gave me as much pleasure, I thought of Ed.

New York pizzerias can be divided into those that apply the steady heat of gas (the most revered of these is Di Fara Pizza) and those that subject their pies to the blistering, scorching fires of coal or wood. The high-heat group is further subdivided into the bakers, such as Co. and Totonno’s, whose reputations rest on their dough, and the cooks. Among the cooks, there are those whose pizzaioli express themselves through combinations of toppings that have never before occurred to anybody (Roberta’s, Paulie Gee’s) or a less exhibitionistic, farm-to-table sensibility, of which the late Franny’s was the paragon.

Razza, which burns wood, is one of the few that excel at both dough and toppings. Even if Ed and I had learned, after our seven-minute PATH ride from the World Trade Center to Grove Street, that the kitchen had run out of cheese, tomatoes and the rest, I would have asked for a pizza dressed with nothing but olive oil. I’m willing to bet it would be delicious that way, with the texture and flavor of naturally leavened bread right from the oven.

I was glad it didn’t come to that, though, because Razza dresses its pies with local ingredients so distinctive that every time I’ve eaten there, I’ve learned something about New Jersey farms.

Our plan was to eat two pies and stop there. Green-edged coins of zucchini were scattered over the first, along with garlic cloves roasted to a translucent jelly, bright white ricotta and cracked pepper. In the center was a lemon wedge. There was ricotta on the other, too, and blots of house-made fig jam, and sheets of prosciutto-style Iowa ham, all covered by unwilted arugula.

Like every pie I’ve eaten at Razza, these two had been put together with exquisite sensitivity to the needs of the dough. The crust had no soggy or underbaked patches, and the bottom surface was crisp all the way from the puffy outer lip to the inner tip, which would jut straight out, or nearly straight, when I picked up a slice. When I tore open the outer rim, the crust crackled and the white interior steamed, soft, somewhat springy, with a slow-building, many-layered, lively flavor underlined by sea salt.

I could have stopped there, my point made. But as Ed noticed belatedly, we’d ordered two white pies, and he wanted to try one with tomatoes. His choice was the classic margherita. I was exceptionally curious, though, about a locavore variant called the Garden State margherita. Its sauce was made from New Jersey heirloom tomatoes and its mozzarella from the milk of Sussex County water buffaloes.

While we were trying to decide, Dan Richer, the chef and owner, came to our table. Mr. Richer, who opened Razza five years ago, may or may not have recognized us, but in any case he had a solution. When he came back, he had placed one half of each margherita variant together to make a full circle. He hadn’t invented this 50-50 format for us, he said; he’d been experimenting with it for an idea he plans to spring on the public shortly: a pizza tasting menu.

Resized Image

A chef prepares pizza dough during a dinner service at Razza Pizza Artigianale in Jersey City.

Razza’s standard margherita, as I knew from previous exposure, is a model within the prescribed parameters of the form. I particularly admire the sauce, which is less acidic and bitter than many, and about as sweet as possible without tasting sugary.

This, it turns out, was not a coincidence. Mr. Richer explained that each January, when he is fairly certain that the latest vintage of tomatoes has been canned, he and his staff conduct a double-blind tasting of eight or so brands from California, New Jersey and Italy. Using a seven-point “tomato evaluation rubric,” they assess each variety for color, viscosity, texture, skins and seeds (the fewer the better), “tomato flavor,” acidity and sweetness. The tomato with the highest score is usually the one he will buy, although he said that one year he blended three different brands, “kind of like a Bordeaux wine.”

For the Garden State pizza, he runs ripe red local tomatoes through a food mill. I do not have a seven-point rubric to describe the flavor of the sauce, but I can say that it was bright and sweet enough to remind me that ripe Jersey tomatoes are still worth hunting down. The buffalo mozzarella, meanwhile, was more buttery and flavorful than any other American mozzarella I’ve tried. It had a slight tartness and melted into soft, unrubbery, creamy-yellow circles.

“I’ve been waiting for that cheese for three years,” Mr. Richer said, explaining that he had been tracking the water buffalo herd until it was big enough to ensure a steady mozzarella supply.

It is not the first obscure homegrown ingredient he has snatched up and built a pizza around. For the past two years Mr. Richer has bought local hazelnuts, a crop that had stubbornly refused to grow in the state until the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station at Rutgers University developed blight-resistant trees. The nuts, fat and round, are barely chopped, and baked with ricotta, mozzarella and just enough honey to point up their natural sweetness. The pizza is called Project Hazelnut. I have never had anything like it.

Farm-consciousness informs the whole menu. New Jersey greens and fruits go into the salads, which are fresh and vivid in ways not normally seen at the corner slice joint.

New Jersey wheat berries and ambient New Jersey yeasts made up the first batch of the pizza dough starter, which has been burbling along for eight years now. New Jersey pork and Hudson Valley beef go into the tender meatballs, which are roasted in the wood oven until they carry a minor char. They are great meatballs, and suggest the kind of Italian restaurant Mr. Richer might have run had he not become transfixed by the intricacies of pizza.

Pennsylvania cream and milk go into Razza’s only dessert, a panna cotta that is more fluffy than firm and is served under a pool of dark salted caramel. Ed and I, having eaten a pizza and a half each, shared a single panna cotta. Then he asked me again: “Are you going to say that the best pizza in New York is in New Jersey?”

Razza NYT Critic’s Pick
275 Grove Street
(Montgomery Street)
201-356-9348
razzanj.com

Atmosphere A casual hangout with some salvaged architectural details and a pervasive smell of wood smoke. Service is cheerful and well informed. Sound Moderate, even with Tom Verlaine and Debbie Harry keening in the background. Recommended Dishes Bread and butter; ricotta crostini; salads; meatballs; all pizzas. Appetizers, $5 to $12; pizza, $12 to $18. Drinks and Wine The wines are Italian. All are under $100 and most are under $60. Cocktails are appealing and often aperitif-based. Price $$ (moderate) Open Monday to Saturday for dinner. Reservations Not accepted. Wheelchair Access Lower dining area and accessible restrooms are a small step above the sidewalk level; main dining area is three steps up. What the Stars Mean Ratings range from zero to four stars. Zero is poor, fair or satisfactory. One star, good. Two stars, very good. Three stars, excellent. Four stars, extraordinary.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/12/din ... -jersey-city.html?mcubz=1

Also

https://ny.eater.com/2017/9/12/1629711 ... -razza-review-jersey-city

Posted on: 9/13 8:34
Top


Re: Replacing shut off valve on the water main line
#13
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

ddm wrote:
Hi, I received letter from Suez water to replace the water meter else they will shut off the water and there will be fine. The house is very old and the shut off valve on street side of meter does not work and needs to be replaced. I called suez and they told me there is nothing they can do and plumber needs to freeze the water line and then replace the valve. I doubt anyone will be able to do that. Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance


Sounds like water supply to the house just needs to be shut off (out front) and then the inside valve (before the meter) needs to be changed. If Suez won't just do it when they change the meter -- then it should not be very expensive to have a plumber do it. The plumber will also have the tool to shut the valve out front off as well.

Posted on: 9/13 8:31
Top


Re: Paintless Dent Repair recommendations?
#14
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

GrovePath wrote:
Quote:

jc_dweller wrote:
Quote:

GrovePath wrote:
Maybe so, but if you live in the city and park on the street - your car will get trashed.


Thanks GrovePath! I've parked on the streets since 2002, and this is the first dent, so I consider myself lucky.


Really - our cars get dinged up all the time - what am I doing wrong? ...and the same was true for me in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Chicago & Philadelphia.


Not to be snarky, but maybe you ARE doing something wrong. I have been parking on the street for almost five years now, and the only dents I have are minor nicks to the rear bumper (from the asswipes who can't parallel park without bumping into the cars in front and back) and one of my motorcycles had its shifting lever bent a little from an asshat trying to park next to it. Nothing else.


OK, trashed might be a bit of a stretch - but yes, I get lots of monthly bumper dings dents and deep black marks into my plastic bumpers - with an occasional bigger dent. Which by the way, my suburban relatives will never understand - their new cars are a big part of their self identities.

Posted on: 9/6 9:51
Top


Re: Paintless Dent Repair recommendations?
#15
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

jc_dweller wrote:
Quote:

GrovePath wrote:
Maybe so, but if you live in the city and park on the street - your car will get trashed.


Thanks GrovePath! I've parked on the streets since 2002, and this is the first dent, so I consider myself lucky.


Really - our cars get dinged up all the time - what am I doing wrong? ...and the same was true for me in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Chicago & Philadelphia.

Posted on: 9/5 16:15
Top


Re: Paintless Dent Repair recommendations?
#16
Home away from home
Home away from home


Maybe so, but if you live in the city and park on the street - your car will get trashed.

Posted on: 9/5 12:55
Top


Re: Paintless Dent Repair recommendations?
#17
Home away from home
Home away from home


No Idea - but Home Depot sells Bondo & Amazon sells matching spray paint.

https://youtu.be/2tfG7B7VAtA

Posted on: 9/4 21:23
Top


NYTimes: Jersey City new rentals so small - they call it co-living
#18
Home away from home
Home away from home


Resized Image

Resized Image

Resized Image

Resized Image


https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/23/style/what-is-co-living.html

In the ’90s, We Had ‘Friends.’ Now They Call It Co-Living.

New York Times
By PENELOPE GREEN
AUG. 23, 2017

Residents attend a terrarium-building event at Jersey City Urby.

Tuesday was family dinner at WeLive Wall Street: vegetarian meatballs and grilled chicken, black truffle gravy and green peas. Thursday was a “craft jam” — terra cotta pot painting amplified by rosé and salty snacks — at Node in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn. A few weeks earlier, I had made a terrarium at Jersey City Urby — bromeliads, plastic critters and rum punch, with the Marshall Tucker Band on the Sonos — and joined a bar crawl through the Lower East Side with a group from Quarters, open since mid-June on Grand Street. I slept in an adorable plywood cubby on Wall Street and on the 68th floor of the tallest residential building in Jersey City, in a flashy model apartment from which you could see all the way up the Hudson River to the George Washington Bridge, a view so vertiginous I dropped to my knees and crawled into bed on my elbows, special-ops-style. (Happily, at such a height, there were no neighbors to see me do so.)

These were some of my adventures in co-living, a housing model that draws inspiration from the single-gender residence hotels of the early 20th century and postwar intentional communities, along with modern co-working spaces and hacker hostels.

Conventional developers are starting to play with the idea, bringing a swankier gloss to what had been homespun group housing. Newer iterations seem more akin to the millennial-focused, hipster-amenitized luxury rental developments that are sprouting countrywide (with design tropes that include raw wood shelving, vintage board games, Dutch bikes and picture books like “The Selby Is In Your Place” strewn about the common areas).

Using architecture, design and so-called community programming (craft jams and bar crawls, say) co-living aims to push people together. It’s housing buoyed by and addressing a collision of attendant themes: the sharing economy and a yearning for connection, social and professional, among overworked millennials and a work force that’s increasingly freelance.

More prosaically, co-living can simply mean roommates and common rooms, like a dorm. For some developers, it’s a form of adaptive reuse: many co-living sites, like WeLive at 110 Wall Street, are leased, in this case from the landlord of what once was an office building, drained of its tenants by Hurricane Sandy.

There are still co-living evangelists, like Brad Hargreaves of Common, who has promised that “the genuine and organic relationships our members build with each other,” as he wrote in a post for Medium, would not be tainted by allowing journalists to sleep over at Common properties (though they were welcome to tour). With over $23 million in financing, Common now operates in five cities, including out of eight houses in New York City.

Some co-living ventures have collapsed under the weight of their ideals, like the utopian Pure House, started by Ryan Fix, now 42, in his Williamsburg loft in 2012. “It was an experiment that grew out of control,” he said the other day, speaking by WhatsApp audio from his computer in London. “I was curating incredibly talented creatives and entrepreneurs committed to social impact as roommates,” a mission that does seem a tad overwhelming.

Eventually, Mr. Fix added 25 Brooklyn apartments to his Pure House portfolio. He recalled organizing dinner parties and morning raves, weekend jaunts to upstate New York and Burning Man, and the overall emotional cost of being a mentor to 65 people, some of whom fell in love, went traveling and started new businesses, he added — juicy alliances he is proud to have overseen.

Worn out by so much connectivity, Mr. Fix turned over the Pure House leases to his tenants. Now, he is a co-living consultant. With a colleague in Paris, he started Pure House Lab, a nonprofit “do-tank,” as he put it, offering workshops, research and other services to the co-living movement, about which he remains bullish. “Loneliness and anxiety are still on the rise,” he said. “The opportunity is to build environments with more points of collision. Creating nurturing spaces where people can share and connect is transformative for the planet.”
Photo

Couches line a communal area on the first floor of Urby. CreditAndrew White for The New York Times

Somewhere, no doubt in the middle of some celestial agora, Holly Whyte is rolling his eyes.

Late June: Terrariums and Cocktails, Jersey City Urby

With a design by Concrete, a Dutch firm, the 69-story Jersey City Urby, the second in a portfolio of new urbanist rentals by Ironstate Development, is a step up, architecturally, for its bland waterfront neighborhood. Its stacked glass volumes rise like elegant Legos over the Hudson. Inside, an armada of common areas stretch out with the sort of design flourishes and perks you’d see in Facebook’s campus in Menlo Park, Calif.: a coffee bar; an AstroTurf lawn; a fire pit; an enormous outdoor swimming pool; and a living room with vintage board games, comfy sofas and, laid out, gallery-style, on slim wood shelves, tongue-in-cheek book titles that include the Dr. Seuss parody “Oh the Meetings You’ll Go To!” along with small batch magazines like Oh Comely and Hole & Corner.

In the sky-lighted mailroom, bright blue metal mailboxes look like mini high school lockers; above, ferns and vines erupt from canvas bags. Though Jersey City Urby, like its sister property on Staten Island, is not quite co-living — it is, essentially, a conventional apartment building with 762 units that rent with conventional leases — its community features are right out of the co-living playbook. (Rents start at $2,500 for a studio.)

The building has both an artist and a scientist in residence. The Staten Island Urby has its own farmer. In June alone, there were all sorts of socially sticky events: wine tastings and ice cream socials; a farmers’ market tour; movies on the pool patio; and terrarium night, held in the Urby Lab, a one-bedroom model apartment on the 68th floor, all of which were overseen by Jo Rausch, 32, director of culture and events for the Urby properties (the newest just opened in nearby Harrison) — and all overbooked.

We were a full table that evening, passing acid-hued moss and tiny plastic creatures to tuck into our globe-shaped terrariums. There was Akshata Puri, a 31-year-old senior data analyst; Bea Walter, 22, a photographer who had just graduated from New York University; and Meghan Kershaw, 31, a nutrition science and policy researcher who works out of the one-bedroom she shares with her husband, Josh, a technology associate at JPMorgan Chase. Ms. Kershaw said that by evening, she is more than ready to leave their apartment. “I’m always looking for community,” she said.

Residents attend a terrarium-building event at Jersey City Urby, which stands 69 stories.

You won’t find much of that outside the building, which is why this Urby is essentially a vertical — and interior — neighborhood. Though the place is 85 percent rented, I was terrified alone in my posh, helicopter-high apartment, missing the street, empty though it was, far, far below. And I marveled at the stamina of my fellow terrarium-creators, who after a long day at their nonprofits and their finance and tech companies could still muster conversation and fine handiwork.

Four attendees appeared at poolside yoga early the next morning, seemingly fast friends, chatting and cheerful in their downward dogs. (In my own faraway youth, after 18 hours or more at work on the equivalent, then, of a start-up — a poorly funded local print product — I could do no more than fill a plastic tray with sesame chicken at the Vietnamese salad bar on Bleecker Street and shuffle home, alone, with a beer.)

Mid-July: Bar Crawl, Quarters on Grand Street

Kahshanna Evans is the community manager at Quarters, run by the Medici Living Group, a co-living company in Berlin. Ms. Evans, a former Girl Scout and model, said it is in part her intuition (and a background check) that organizes roommates into salubrious arrangements in this brand-new, seven-story brick building on the Lower East Side. From the ceiling of the living room and open kitchen, bulbs hung from dangly cords. There were leather beanbag chairs, a wide-plank table and a bulletin board featuring miniature Polaroid portraits of the tenants.

On a recent Wednesday, Ms. Evans was setting out vases of wildflowers and bowls of cherries, grapes, strawberries and chips. There was rosé and beer. She noted that her Girl Scout experience had equipped her for this mission, with core principles like “Leave the place cleaner than when you arrived.” In a tour of the apartments upstairs, which are stylishly furnished with Casper mattresses and sturdy furniture from the Detroit company Floyd, Ms. Evans smoothed bedspreads and pillows.


Rents start at $1,749 for rooms in three- to five-bedroom units. Sally Lyndley, a fashion stylist, is paying $3,499 for a 212-square-foot room, which comes with a terrace and four roommates, none of whom she met before moving in, so the background check was a perk. “I wanted to make sure it wasn’t a frat house,” said Ms. Lyndley, 38, “because Mama’s grown out of that. Or you meet a nice roommate, but she’s a heroin addict. I’ve been down that road.”

Up on the roof (squashy canvas beanbags), we could see a gaggle of yoga practitioners who swayed and dipped a few buildings away. “Is this ‘The Matrix’?” Ms. Evans wondered, before clapping her hands and gathering up the group. “Should we say hello to our future selves?”

At Mr. Purple, a bar on top of the Hotel Indigo on Ludlow Street, we drank beer out of cans and I babbled on about the place’s namesake, Adam Purple, the community garden activist and tie-dyed, purple-clad eccentric I recalled riding his bike through the city of my past self. It seemed more than gauche that his memory should be evoked by a slick boutique hotel. But never mind.

I met a co-living couple, Derek Pankaew, 29 and a start-up entrepreneur, and Wenxi Zhao, 23, a jewelry designer. They had fallen in love at Founder House Broadway, a co-living establishment devoted to those in tech, but when the place lost its lease, they came to Quarters. They live separately there, so as to create more space in the relationship, Mr. Pankaew said later, adding that the couple took a 10-day break recently.
Photo

Ms. Lyndley, a resident of Quarters, in the doorway of her penthouse room. CreditAndrew White for The New York Times

“That just meant that we weren’t making out, though we were seeing each other every day,” he said. Regular apartment life is boring, he continued, but there are challenges to co-living. “People getting drunk and hooking up, there’s more potential for drama to happen. And in a normal apartment you don’t have 30 people who know what’s going on in your relationship. If we have a fight,” he said of Ms. Zhao, “everybody wants to know what it’s about.”

“Scooby, scooby, guys,” said Ms. Evans, “come along!” It was time for the next port, the bistro Dirty French across the street, followed by one more: Max Fish, the beloved, art-inflected 1990s-era hangout on Ludlow Street that closed there in 2013 and reopened a year later on Orchard. I decided to skip that stop. I’d been there before, after all.

Early August: Family Dinner at WeLive Wall Street

WeLive is run by the seven-year-old WeWork co-working behemoth, now with a valuation of $20 billion and with offices in 49 cities in 15 countries. There are 200 fully furnished apartments on Wall Street, from studios (about $3,000 a month) to three-bedrooms outfitted with housewares and towels. You can stay as long as a year, or for one night only ($296), which is what I did a week or so ago, checking into a “studio plus”: a cunning rectangle with a full-size bed built into a plywood cupboard, like a Swedish bed in a Carl Larsson painting imagined by a Brooklyn furniture maker.

There’s a galley kitchen, and a sleek white laminate cabinet hiding a Murphy bed from Resource Furniture, for those who want a roommate or a houseguest. Plywood pegboard shelves were accessorized with quirky objets (chrome cactuses, an origami bird) and curated books (Heidi Julavits, Tom Perrotta, Mick Fleetwood’s memoir).

I liked my cubby bed, but apartments tucked into office buildings can be grim, despite the ferry terminal outside this one, the literary embellishments and the free coffee.

Floors are organized into “neighborhoods,” with open staircases and unifying decorative schemes. There’s a B.Y.O. whiskey bar, a library, and common kitchens are stocked with coffee and fruit water. The laundry room has a pool table. You can buy snacks there with the WeLive app, which also alerts you to group events, like family dinners, “Game of Thrones” nights or kickboxing classes. It’s all a bit bro-themed: On a blackboard panel were chalked the words “Do You Have Ur Keys.”

But there were women at family dinner that night, like Kimberly Cockrell, 37, newly arrived from Miami for a job in the shipping industry, and delighted, she said, to be rid of her three-bedroom house. The free wine and food was nice, too. “I don’t even have a broom here,” she said. “It feels pretty great not to have to cut the grass.”

Rob Stamm, 22, and Cody McClintock, 25, had been in the building barely five hours (it was move-in day). They had met after Mr. McClintock, a software designer and developer who loves photography, had found Mr. Stamm’s work on Instagram. The two friends were sharing a studio plus, with Mr. McClintock on the Murphy bed. “I took one for the team,” he said, pointing out that they had made a pact to spend as little time as possible in the apartment, and in the building. “To be honest, I don’t want to be that guy that’s networking with all the people here,” he said.

P
hoto

From left, Evan Kasper, Kahshanna Evans, Ms. Liu, Penelope Green, Fabiana Fornerino, Wenxi Zhao and Lukas Dutsch walk to Dirty French, a bar and restaurant on the Lower East Side. CreditAndrew White for The New York Times

Blaine Ford, WeLive’s community manager, said he encourages tenants to not join the WeWork offices in the building, but pick a location that’s at least a few blocks away. “It’s good for people to have a bit of a commute,” he said, “and just go outside.”

Early August: CraftJam at Node Brooklyn in Bushwick

On a scruffy block on Eldert Street in Bushwick, a renovated brick townhouse built around 1900 gleamed like a showplace in Brooklyn Heights. Inside, a parlor room was swathed in Brooklyn toile; there were vintage photographs of the neighborhood, and on the shelves, the requisite board games and other accouterments of the internet-weary.

The apartments, fully furnished in a gender-neutral, post-West Elm manner, have plump blue Smeg refrigerators in their open-shelved galley kitchens. The backyard is propped with Brimfield finds — seats made from rusty milk cans, vintage signs — and above, a web of industrial light bulbs.

On this night, nearly all of the building’s 13 tenants had gathered to paint pots for tiny succulents, an activity led by Paivi Kankaro, 34, whose company, CraftJam, runs D.I.Y. events around New York City. “Craft is yoga for your brain,” Ms. Kankaro said. “And people want to do other things than go to a bar.” (There was ample wine, however.)

I observed the impressive efforts of Peter and Gena Cuba, both 33 and graphic designers originally from the Midwest. They had moved to Node from Brooklyn Heights, as it happened, because they felt that the comforts of that neighborhood had become a trap. Ms. Cuba also had a hankering for a bathtub. Rents start at $2,800 for a one-bedroom. You can bring your own roommates, or Jeanette Dobrowski, Node’s 28-year-old community curator, will fix you up.

“We target global citizens who want to live with people from all walks of life,” said Dorothea Avery, Node Brooklyn’s 36-year-old co-founder, and a former Wall Street trader. Node tenants include a Blue Man Group member from London, a French wine consultant and a public affairs specialist from North Carolina who is just 22. Ms. Avery noted the boons to a developer for charging a premium for well-appointed spaces — four more Node Brooklyn buildings are nearly complete — and also the health advantages of group living.


Posted on: 9/4 16:08
Top


Downtown FIRE -- Introcaso-Angelo Funeral Home on Brunswick Street damaged by fire last night
#19
Home away from home
Home away from home


Resized Image


Resized Image


Resized Image


Resized Image


Jersey City funeral home damaged by fire

September 4, 2017
The Jersey Journal

JERSEY CITY -- A Downtown Jersey City funeral home suffered smoke and water damage last night as a result of what appears to have been an electrical fire that started at 8:15 p.m. at Introcaso-Angelo Funeral Home, an official said this afternoon.

A resident of the building at 143 Brunswick Street saw a transformer on a utility pole short circuit and then saw smoke coming from the building's basement before calling 911, Jersey City spokeswoman Jennifer Morrill said.

Firefighters made quick work of the 1-alarm fire, but the first-floor funeral home and basement suffered smoke and water damage, Morrill said, adding that no one was injured.

Public Service Electric & Gas cut power to the building and four families living above the business sought temporary shelter elsewhere, Morrill said.

One resident was evaluated by emergency medical technicians at the scene but was not transported for additional treatment.




Posted on: 9/4 16:02
Top


Re: Hurricane Irma possible: Next Tuesday thru Thursday
#20
Home away from home
Home away from home



Posted on: 9/2 20:04
Top


Re: Hurricane Irma possible: Next Tuesday thru Thursday
#21
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

MDM wrote:

GFS Jersey City Armageddon screen shots below:

Resized Image


Resized Image


Wow - what days is this possible?

Posted on: 9/1 22:59
Top


Re: NYPD Cop Kills Dog - Shoots US Marshal Hunting Fugitive on Bayview Ave.
#22
Home away from home
Home away from home


Greenville: Cop Shoots & Kills Charging Pit Bull- then Accidentally Shoots Fellow Officer.

=======================

NYPD Cop Shoots U.S. Marshal, Pit Bull In New Jersey: Prosecutor

A NYPD officer shot a U.S. Marshal and a pit bull while executing an arrest warrant at a Jersey City home, prosecutors say.

By Eric Kiefer (Patch Staff)
Updated August 31, 2017

HUDSON COUNTY, NJ — An officer from the New York Police Department shot a U.S. Marshal and a pit bull while executing an arrest warrant at a Jersey City residence on Thursday morning, authorities said.

The raid took place around 6:35 a.m. at 9 Bayview Avenue in Jersey City, the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office stated.

During the encounter, the officer – who was working alongside law enforcement officials from the U.S. Marshals Service – fired his gun and killed a large, attacking pit bull, prosecutors said.

The same officer also fired another round that struck a deputy marshal in the foot, prosecutors said.

ABC New York described the marshal’s wound as a non-life threatening injury.

The Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office is investigating the incident; no additional information was immediately available.

The suspect, Javan Reaves, was reportedly wanted for a robbery in New York City. Police apprehended him successfully, the NY Daily News reported.

https://patch.com/new-jersey/newarknj/ ... arrest-attempt-prosecutor

Posted on: 9/1 14:41
Top


Re: 3rd QT (8/1) tax bill still missing from JC website
#23
Home away from home
Home away from home


So did everyone get the new tax bill - and when must it be paid?

Posted on: 9/1 9:34
Top


Greenville - a loaded rifle with a high-capacity 29 round magazine found in yard.
#24
Home away from home
Home away from home


Loaded rifle found in Jersey City backyard, police say
Updated on August 28, 2017 at 4:11 PM
Posted on August 28, 2017 at 3:13 PM
52 shares

By Caitlin Mota

The Jersey Journal


JERSEY CITY -- A rifle loaded with more than two dozen rounds of ammunition was found in the backyard in the Greenville neighborhood, officials said.

The LRB M-15 gun -- a semi-automatic rifle -- was found at about 3 p.m. on Aug. 22 on Ocean Avenue near the Neptune Avenue intersection, city spokeswoman Jennifer Morrill said.

A Jersey City firefighter has been suspended without pay following his arrest for sharing explicit photos of children.

Police said the weapon had a high-capacity magazine and was loaded with 29 rounds. The gun is not compliant with New Jersey laws, which limit the size of the magazine to 15 rounds.

No one has been arrested in the discovery and an investigation is ongoing, Morrill said.

Caitlin Mota may be reached at cmota@jjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @caitlin_mota. Find The Jersey Journal on Facebook.

Posted on: 8/29 15:57
Top


What bar was this at?
#25
Home away from home
Home away from home


Resized Image


Texas man threatens to dismember Jersey City woman after drinks

August 29, 2017

Billy P. Pirtle, 37, of Texas, appears in court in Jersey City on Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, on charges he assaulted a Jersey City woman and threatened to chop her up and throw her parts in a dumpster.

By Michaelangelo Conte
The Jersey Journal

JERSEY CITY -- A 37-year-old Texas man having drinks with a Jersey City woman Thursday threatened to dismember her and throw her body parts in a dumpster, authorities said.

The woman told police she and Billy P. Pirtle, of Abilene, were intoxicated in her apartment when he began making racist remarks, pounding his chest and punching himself in the jaw while saying "F--- me," the criminal complaint says.

She said she tried to calm down Pirtle, but he suddenly punched her in the stomach, knocking her down. She said when she tried to leave, he said "I will chop you up and put you in a dumpster," the complaint says.

The victim said Pirtle continued by saying, "You will never get away from me." The woman told police she pretended she needed to vomit and was able to escape her home "fearing for her life," the complaint alleges.

Pirtle was arrested by officers responding to a 911 call and he was charged with simple assault and making terroristic threats. He made his first appearance on the charges on Friday in Criminal Justice Reform Court in Jersey City via video link from Hudson County jail on Friday.

At the hearing, the state moved to detain him through the course of his prosecution and a detention hearing is set for Wednesday before Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale.

Police said Pirtle appeared to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time of his arrest. The woman complained of stomach pain, but refused medical attention, the complaint says.

The complaint does not characterize the racist remarks allegedly made by Pirtle.

----------
Jersey City police arrested two men spotted in a car near the Grove Street PATH Station which had been reported stolen in Texas and also found gun in the vehicle stolen in that state as well


Posted on: 8/29 15:41
Top


Re: Hurricane Irma possible: Next Tuesday thru Thursday
#26
Home away from home
Home away from home


Glad it is just Irma. Accuweather is saying Saturday night & Sunday we will likely get Harvey Rain as it moves up and out. Thanks!

Posted on: 8/29 15:10
Top


Re: Confederate Flag added to Liberty State Park
#27
Home away from home
Home away from home


Resized Image


Man Who Hung Confederate Flags Calls Them 'Beautiful,' Says He's No Bigot

By Allegra Hobbs | August 24, 2017
DNAINFO.com

William Green said he would have taken down the Confederate flags hanging in his windows if he had been in the city when recent events in Charlottesville occurred.

EAST VILLAGE — The tenant whose apartment window display of Confederate flags sparked mayhem last week called them "beautiful" historical symbols that have nothing to do with racism — claiming had no idea about the controversy his display caused because he was out of town.

William Green, 43, said he was shocked to return to his apartment at 403 E. Eighth St. after a weekslong vacation to discover the extent of the outrage his two Confederate battle flags had suddenly created, moving one man to hurl rocks at the building and another to punch through Green's apartment window while he was away.

The flags had been there for roughly a year, and Green had never received a complaint, he said.

He acknowledged that he understood the recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia, prompted the sudden outburst, noting that if he'd been home at the time, he probably would have taken the flags down

"If I was here in the city when all of that happened I likely would have taken them down myself, but I was not here when that happened," he said of the Charlottesville incident, in which a woman was killed after a white supremacist rally where many of the attendees carried Confederate flags.

"If my neighbors had come to me, face to face, then I would have [taken them down]," he said.

Instead, he was alerted to the mayhem via email by his landlord, who later filed a lawsuit against Green to keep the flags down and threatened to evict him. The owner dropped the lawsuit just two days after it was filed, records show, and Green said they are back on good terms.

"He was panicking," he said of property owner Charles Yassky. "And who could blame him? It's still hard to believe."

However, Green maintained that the display shouldn't be conflated with bigotry.

"[Racism] is still is a problem, that I agree, but pegging the Confederate flag as a symbol of it isn’t helping anybody," he said. "It is a gross misrepresentation of that flag. It really is a beautiful flag representing sacrifice and commitment."

Alarmed locals started circulating photos of the flags hanging in the windows on social media days after the deadly Charlottesville rally, with some of the comments on widely shared Facebook posts suggested throwing rocks or bricks through the windows.

A man was then caught on video Wednesday morning hurling rocks at the building and yelling that the flags must be taken down, calling their presence a "hate crime."

Then, on Friday night,a DJ who lives around the corner from the building became so agitated by the flags he climbed down the fire escape and punched out one of Green's windows. He was arrested that night and charged with criminal mischief.

Because the flags were lit up in the windows at night, many assumed Green was home and refusing to confront his neighbors.

But the tenant had been in the Pocono Mountains with his boyfriend since earlier in the month with limited Internet access, and his lights were automated to give the impression he was home as a way to discourage break-ins, he explained.

Green insisted he originally put up the flags because he loves their historical significance, which he argued had very little to do with slavery. He claimed both the Union and the Confederacy agreed during the Civil War that "the institution [of slavery] had to go, but the problem was figuring out how it would go."

Green's explanation of the flag's significance that he submitted to his landlord after he was asked to take them down reads: "THE DIXIELAND FLAG WILL ALWAYS REPRESENT THE 400,000 CONFEDERATE FATHERS THAT LOVED THEIR COUNTRY THE WAY THEIR GOD LOVED THE WORLD."

Additionally, a pair of Iron Cross flags that previously adorned his windows — which he said represent Imperial Germany, not Nazi Germany — as well as the Israeli flags that hung there were meant to be tributes to the history of the East Village, he said.

"The history of this neighborhood is German and Jewish," he enthused, adding the Iron Cross was the "flag of the German immigrants who came here."

Originally from the Jersey Shore, Green's father was a cross-country truck driver whose trips gave him an appreciation for Southern culture.

"My early childhood memories are in his truck going up and down the Eastern seaboard and into the Midwest, so I have an appreciation for the honest, simple, hardworking nature of Southern culture that still pervades today," he said.

Green said he has lived in the East Village since he was 17 years old, when he got an illegal sublet in the Jacob Riis Houses across the street. He has lived in his current rent-stabilized apartment since 1996.

The lawsuit filed against him last weekend dredged up old baggage between he and his landlord from a 2006 eviction attempt, he said, adding they are now on good terms.

Commenting on DNAinfo's story on the lawsuit, he said the suicide attempt alleged in the suit was a lie.

Green's recent troubles haven't stopped with the flag display, as he was recently expelled from the College of Staten Island after a spat with his professor over his thesis on Thomas Jefferson, he said.

Asked whether he planned to keep the flags down, Green said the Confederate flag would stay down for at least a year, though he might reintroduce the Iron Cross flags to mark the 100-year anniversary of the fall of the German Empire.

So far, there haven't been any run-ins following his return to the East Village, he said, adding he just wants to move on and put the whole conflict behind him. He doesn't even hold a grudge against Keen for punching his window, he said.

"There's a great wisdom to forgiveness," Green said.

https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20170 ... rain-person-struck-subway

Posted on: 8/29 15:07
Top


Re: Hurricane Irma possible: Next Tuesday thru Thursday
#28
Home away from home
Home away from home


Are these maps of Irma - or is that storm something else?

Quote:

MDM wrote:
Model runs for the next 4 hours: GFS, Euro, and GEM shifted the path West, but lowered the storm intensity. Basically, the storm, which may not be named, is more of a classic Nor'Easter.

Resized Image


Resized Image
Resized Image

Posted on: 8/29 9:56
Top


Re: 3rd QT (8/1) tax bill still missing from JC website
#29
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

MDM wrote:
Is there a grace period or are the bills due on the date posted?


I was wondering that too - at least a real bill would be nice.

Posted on: 8/25 9:24
Top


Re: Hurricane Irma possible: Next Tuesday thru Thursday
#30
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

RichMauro wrote:
Another slow news day on the forum??

Sheesh....


I really appreciate the heads up to things like this - it aids in planning.

Posted on: 8/25 9:22
Top



TopTop
(1) 2 3 4 ... 290 »






Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!



LicenseInformation | AboutUs | PrivacyPolicy | Faq | Contact


JERSEY CITY LIST - News & Reviews - Jersey City, NJ - Copyright 2004 - 2017