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Re: Confederate Flag added to Liberty State Park
#1
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Ok, Big Guy

Posted on: Yesterday 9:42
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Re: Confederate Flag added to Liberty State Park
#2
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What - no Trump Flag waving?

Even on Fox News, normally a redoubt of Trump support, with the anchor Guy Benson saying that Mr. Trump “lost me” when he insisted that some “very fine people” participated in the white supremacist rally.

“They were chanting things like, ‘Jews will not replace us,’” Mr. Benson said. “There’s nothing good about that.”

Posted on: Yesterday 8:47
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Re: Confederate Flag added to Liberty State Park
#3
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Seems like a good time to change out these confederate flags for ones with just the offending states name.

Posted on: Yesterday 8:20
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Re: Car service to BK
#4
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Off topic - but Jersey City needs a ferry to go back and forth to Brooklyn.

Posted on: 8/14 15:00
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Re: Shooting on Newark Av
#5
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Quote:


http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... er_shooting_reported.html

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The car had a flat tire and numerous dents. Two bullet holes in the windshield were also visible.

Meanwhile, nearby on Tonnelle Avenue, two cars were stopped on the road, which was also littered with debris, possibly from a crash or from a bullet striking a vehicle. Police found bullet casings and placed about a dozen evidence markers on the street near the two cars. One evidence marker was placed on a vehicle.

Amit Patel, who was working in a nearby laundromat, said he heard three or four shots fired outside his business.


Man is shot on Broadway in Jersey City, police say

August 14, 2017 at 8:35 AM

A man was shot in Jersey City early Friday, but he was uncooperative with police investigating the shooting.

By Ron Zeitlinger
The Jersey Journal

A 24-year-old man was shot early Friday on Broadway in Jersey City, a city spokeswoman said.

The man's injuries were not considered life-threatening, city spokeswoman Jennifer Morrill said, who noted that the shooting occurred just before 5 a.m.

The victim, who Morrill said was uncooperative with police, was treated at the RJWBarnabas' Jersey City Medical Center.

Posted on: 8/14 11:23
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Why Jersey City Missed Out On Being the Big Apple
#6
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http://www.thedailybeast.com/why-jers ... ut-on-being-the-big-apple

CONDITIONS FOR THE CREATIVE ACT

Why Jersey City Missed Out On Being the Big Apple
Because those living, working and playing in Manhattan were trapped between the East and Hudson Rivers, intellectual cross-fertilization was almost inevitable.

MARC J. DUNKELMAN
08.13.17

In the years following the American Revolution, not everyone expected New York to emerge as America’s preeminent city. Philadelphia had hosted the Constitutional Convention. Boston was a crucial manufacturing hub. And even among the cities crowding the lower Hudson (then called the North River), some believed that those on the western shore were more likely to flourish. A figure no less prominent than Alexander Hamilton predicted that Jersey City would eventually become the “metropolis of the world.”

There was good reason. New Jersey boasted all the advantages of Manhattan without many of its liabilities. Both offered access to the same harbor, and then to the Atlantic. Both were situated along a navigable river that would eventually connect to the Erie Canal. But while Manhattan real estate was relatively scarce, Jersey’s expanse seemed limitless. Just as important, goods manufactured in the Garden State were already on the mainland, and could be shipped to points south and west without having to traverse an extra body of water.

Nearly two centuries later, Jane Jacobs offered a novel explanation for New York’s triumph. In The Economy of Cities, published in 1969, she argued that the elements most scholars cited when trying to explain metropolitan success—access to natural resources, for example—obscured one monumentally important factor: the random collision of ideas.

Several years earlier, the famed journalist Arthur Koestler had published The Act of Creation, a book which argued that “the creative act is not an act of creation in the sense of the Old Testament. It does not create something out of nothing; it uncovers, selects, re-shuffles, combines, synthesizes already existing facts, ideas, faculties, skills.”

Jacobs applied Koestler’s insight to the urban landscape. Successful cities, she contended, managed to overlay different industries, communities and experiences. Growth is born from innovation, and innovation emerges only when concepts can jump easily from one field to another. Because those living, working and playing in New York they were trapped between the East and Hudson Rivers and couldn’t so easily escape one another, intellectual cross-fertilization was almost inevitable. In other words, Manhattan’s tighter quarters were instrumental to the Big Apple’s success.

Since then, the Koestler/Jacobs theory has become a staple of popular business literature. Pick up a recent edition of the Harvard Business Review and you’ll be hard-pressed to avoid stumbling on a story extolling the virtues of “breaking out of your silo.” But those looking to spark innovation on a wider scale rarely think about social architecture even as America sleepwalks through an entrepreneurial crisis. Statistical measures of new business creation have been halved since the 1970s. As one economist testified last year before the Senate Small Business Committee: "Millennials are on track to be the least entrepreneurial generation in recent history.”

Beyond asking whether investing in better schools or more research and development, it’s time we entertain another possibility: American innovation may be suffering from the fact that Americans today have less exposure to ideas outside the realm of their own experience.

In 2000, Robert Putnam’s Bowling Alone laid out reams of evidence suggesting that Americans were becoming increasingly isolated from one another. But critics countered that digital technology (and now social media) put billions of people mere clicks away from an exchange of ideas; globalization, they argued, actually brings strangers together. What’s clear now is that that argument missed the point. Whether or not we have more or less “social capital” in the aggregate, we’re inarguably choosing to invest our time and energy today in different sorts of relationships. And as Jacobs would point out, who we know has a profound effect on what we think.

America’s social architecture has undergone a subtle but profound transformation over the last several decades. Data from the General Social Survey suggests that Americans have maintained roughly the same amount of time with their most intimate acquaintances (the handful with whom we exchange text messages) and their more ephemeral contacts (the elementary school pals we friend on Facebook). From 1974 to 2014, the percentage who reported spending a “social evening” with a relative more than once a month fell just slightly from 58 percent to 55 percent. The share spending more than one evening with a friend who lived outside their neighborhood actually grew from 40 percent to 42 percent. But the percentage reporting a social evening spent with someone who lived near them plummeted from 44 percent to 32 percent, suggesting that we’ve broadly abandoned the middling contacts that were once a staple of the American life. For better or worse, we’ve become strangers to the neighbors, Rotarians, bridge partners and bowling-league teammates who would once have been more familiar.

Which brings us back to the roots of intellectual cross-fertilization; after all, not every category of relationship brings people with different points of view into close proximity. Coining the phrase, “the strength of weak ties,” Stanford sociologist Mark Granovetter argued decades ago that more intimate contacts rarely proffered new concepts, if only because we know what our closest acquaintances think already. That might augur for more ferment today if only because weak ties have proliferated through the digital revolution. But a distinction exists between familiar and entirely ephemeral connections. A true exchange of ideas demands more depth than what is often on offer in the comments section of a Facebook post.

We should be so lucky to find simple ways to stir the pot. If, as some suggest, Americans lived in denser environments, used mass transit, and sent their children to public schools, they might be more prone to encounter new thinking. But as Bill Bishop argued in The Big Sort, even our neighborhoods have become more monolithic because we’re prone to settle among people who share our sensibilities. And it’s not just that. Look at all the people walking their dogs and riding the subway with earbuds that make them deaf to the world. On the whole, Americans have become increasingly private even in public spaces.

Nearly two decades ago, the University of Chicago’s Ronald Burt released the findings of a study he’d done of Raytheon, a defense contractor that boasted state-of-the-art physical plants, talented engineers, access to many of the world’s greatest academic institutions and much more. Trying to uncover the roots of new thinking, Burt concluded that the Raytheon employees most likely to have good ideas weren’t those entrenched most deeply in any one field of expertise or another. Rather, the unlikely stars were those few who “spanned structural holes.” In other words, the most intellectually disruptive employees were those with their hands in the work of more than one department.

What would it take to compel Americans to span more structural holes in their everyday lives? I’ve yet to stumble on a wholly satisfactory answer. There’s great promise in programs like AmeriCorps, which places Americans from wildly different backgrounds into eighteen-month service projects. But maybe more hopeful is the progress educators have made imbuing young students with additional “grit.” The most pervasive barrier preventing individuals from exploring new ideas often centers on a fear that substantive encounters outside a familiar bubble will be awkward, dangerous, or uncomfortable. Someone might discover that an interesting stranger voted for the other presidential candidate—or harbors some sort of ugly prejudice.

Exposure to new ideas often requires the ability to maintain your equanimity in the face of disagreement. A grittier America would be less likely to lash out or turn away in disgust.

We can hardly fault Alexander Hamilton for being born more than 200 years before Jacobs published The Economy of Cities. But we should heed the warning of his mistaken prediction that Jersey City would become today’s Manhattan. We’ve finally solved the mystery of how good ideas emerge. Our challenge now is to is compensate for the sociological shift that has begun to temper the hot stew of intellectual cross-fertilization.

Marc J. Dunkelman is a fellow both at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and NYU’s Marron Institute of Urban Management. His first book, The Vanishing Neighbor: The Transformation of American Community, was published by W.W. Norton.

Posted on: 8/13 1:29
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Re: Need a rooftop decoration?
#7
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http://www.nydailynews.com/news/natio ... lloween-article-1.3403377

Fear not, Trump chicken is a Halloween outfit too.

Posted on: 8/11 18:15
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Re: Shooting on Newark Av
#8
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Wow -- Little India -- Kennedy to Tonnelle -- that is the slowest block in all of JC. Those cars look like they were shot at close range.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... er_shooting_reported.html

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The car had a flat tire and numerous dents. Two bullet holes in the windshield were also visible.

Meanwhile, nearby on Tonnelle Avenue, two cars were stopped on the road, which was also littered with debris, possibly from a crash or from a bullet striking a vehicle. Police found bullet casings and placed about a dozen evidence markers on the street near the two cars. One evidence marker was placed on a vehicle.

Amit Patel, who was working in a nearby laundromat, said he heard three or four shots fired outside his business.

Posted on: 8/11 17:54
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Re: Shooting on Newark Av
#9
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I heard that it was just a rumour - anyone know real details? When and where exactly did this happen?

Posted on: 8/11 16:16
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Re: Need a rooftop decoration?
#10
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Posted on: 8/10 18:14
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Need a rooftop decoration?
#11
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Posted on: 8/10 17:07
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Re: Woman dies falling off escalator inside famed World Trade Center Oculus while reaching to grab hat
#12
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Quote:

mrspigglewiggle wrote:
Oh no, this is sad. Some reports online report this was a suicide attempt... Jumping in front of trains, jumping from highrises, now jumping from the Occulus...

http://nypost.com/2017/08/01/man-plummets-from-oculus-balcony/


Likely just embarrassed that his parents only would find him living in Downtown Jersey City rather than Manhattan.

Posted on: 8/2 12:26
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Re: Woman dies falling off escalator inside famed World Trade Center Oculus while reaching to grab hat
#13
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Man Falls 30 Feet Inside Oculus World Trade Center, FDNY Says
BREAKING: A man was injured Tuesday when he fell from a staircase inside the World Trade Center transportation hub, authorities said.

By Ciara McCarthy (Patch Staff) - Updated August 1, 2017 1:14 pm

Man Falls 30 Feet Inside Oculus World Trade Center, FDNY Says
FINANCIAL DISTRICT, NY — A man was seriously injured on Tuesday when he fell from a staircase inside the "Oculus" World Trad Center transportation hub, authorities said.

The man fell from the east staircase inside the transportation hub and shopping center, a Port Authority spokesman confirmed. An FDNY spokesman said the man was believed to have fallen about 30 feet through the air.

The man has been transported to a nearby hospital, authorities said. The extent of his injuries was not immediately known. An FDNY spokesman told Patch that injuries were "serious," but did not have additional details. The fall was reported to the fire department shortly after 12 p.m.

EMS members are operating on scene at 185 Greenwich St. 1 patient transported in serious condition
Aug 1, 2017

Authorities did not identify the man, but a Port Authority spokesman said he is believed to be about 40 years old. Port Authority police are investigating the incident, and did not immediately have additional information about what preceded the fall.

In February, a woman died after she fell from an escalator inside the Oculus. Police said the woman was reaching for her sister's hat, which had fallen as the two were riding down the escalator.

https://patch.com/new-york/downtown-ny ... ld-trade-center-fdny-says

Posted on: 8/1 14:06
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Re: What's with the "Official Business" plaques in random truck windows?
#14
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First - where & when were they parked.
Second - where do I get one?

Posted on: 7/31 21:00
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Re: No UFOs Spotted in JC - but Sightings Reported Across New York City
#15
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Posted on: 7/31 18:19
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Re: 2 Dead - 3 Hospitalized after Overdoses at Crystal Point - 2nd St.
#16
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Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

GrovePath wrote:
"5 a.m. Sunday morning...People ... said they were having trouble breathing and had been using drugs that night.... Two people were pronounced dead and three were taken to Jersey City Medical Center.... "

So what bar were they at on Saturday night?



Don't anyone worry, people. Detective Poirot is on the case. He has already determined the drugs came from the bouncers at a local bar.

Meanwhile, in the real world, most people are getting drugs delivered to their homes by couriers, or through friends/contacts.

Serious question: why are you so convinced they got their drugs from a local bar?


Look at the time line -- 5AM Saturday Night/Sunday morning - people do drugs soon after they get them -- so likely they got the drugs around 3AM, took them home & then soon after OD'ed. So likely closing time they bought some for the road - to keep the party going. Hard to believe they called a dealer that late -- police should just check out where they were that Saturday night & check out the doorman. Many downtown bars are getting to be an issue.

Posted on: 7/31 15:14
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Heights (Griffith & Central): Woman's death investigation sparks hazmat response to Bedbugs
#17
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Woman's death investigation sparks hazmat response in Jersey City

By Caitlin Mota
The Jersey Journal

JERSEY CITY - First responders investigating the death of a woman in her mid 40s found a bug infestation so severe it prompted a heavy hazmat response from the city's fire department.

Sources with knowledge of the investigation said they were called to a home on Griffith Street between Central and Summit Avenues for a sick call. The woman's family told responders she had been drinking and collapsed inside the home.

First responders performed CPR, but the woman was pronounced dead at the scene. What appeared to be bedbugs covered the walls and other items inside the home, sources said.

The fire department set up a hazmat station in the middle of Griffith Street, where anyone who went inside the building was scrubbed to make sure all of the bugs that were sticking to their clothing were removed, sources said.

At the scene, residents stood stunned as dozens of firefighters, health inspectors and medical examiners flooded the quiet Heights neighborhood.

Elizabeth Jackson, who lives a few blocks away, said she walks down Griffith Street almost every day and frequently saw the woman sitting on the porch with her parents. The two often said hello as they crossed paths.

"We said 'hi, how are you today,'" Jackson recalled.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... arks_hazmat_response.html

Posted on: 7/31 9:03
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No UFOs Spotted in JC - but Sightings Reported Across New York City
#18
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https://patch.com/new-york/downtown-ny ... ings-across-new-york-city

Six UFOs have allegedly showed up in Brooklyn, four in Manhattan, three in the Bronx and three in Queens so far this year.

Posted on: 7/31 8:18
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Re: Choc O Pain - Now Open in the Heights! Yum!
#19
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We love Rumbas on Central - but will check out Noches De Colombia -- btw the staff at Rumbas has become pretty English friendly over the years - and most of the servers are still there.

Quote:

MDM wrote:
Quote:

South_Sixth wrote:
People like HEIGHTS are why we can't have nice things.


He does have a point in regards to the prices. You don't have a critical mass of high income people in the Heights yet for high end specialty food. The places I see doing well serve food at a lower price than you would find in Manhattan, Hoboken, etc.

An example: Noches De Colombia which opened relatively recently is always packed. Given the portions and quality, the place is a really good deal.

There is a Gelato place farther North on Central Ave. Good product, but expensive when you look at what you get for $5+. The place is always empty when I walk by.

Side note: Giving a Thumb-Up to De Columbia. So far we have had two good dinners from them. My only criticism of the place is it is hard to find a server that speaks English. The staff swapped servers on us when they found out my wife (though she looks it) isn't from South or Central America. Trying to order over the phone is a lost cause for non Spanish speakers.

Posted on: 7/30 19:33
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Re: 2 Dead - 3 Hospitalized after Overdoses at Crystal Point - 2nd St.
#20
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"5 a.m. Sunday morning...People ... said they were having trouble breathing and had been using drugs that night.... Two people were pronounced dead and three were taken to Jersey City Medical Center.... "

So what bar were they at on Saturday night?


Posted on: 7/30 17:05
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Re: 2 Dead - 3 Hospitalized after Overdoses at Crystal Point - 2nd St.
#21
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A lot of Downtown bars have "Doormen" or whatever you call them -- and they openly sell drugs - also it seemed like lots of dealing going on all around at Lucky 7's Block Party a few weeks back. Is there much undercover action on this?

Posted on: 7/30 12:11
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Re: Big Chef?
#22
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Posted on: 7/23 21:21
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Re: Jersey Citu Chinese food
#23
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What are the dishes you order the most -and what is yellow rice? I get white or brown -- but I don't eat fried rice.

Posted on: 7/22 11:57
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Re: Big Chef?
#24
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I think it depends on what you get - as a vegan they will let you really tell them what and how you want the sauce. I always get no thickening - no corn starch etc. I don't do garlic and I like a sweet spicy sesame sauce - but I also don't order there often - or off the menu. Just ask them for what you want. Future too...

Like you I also miss futures Mexican take out. We would get their Chinese vegetables in a taco shell often. There really needs to be a better buritto take out joint.

Posted on: 7/21 21:55
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Re: Big Chef?
#25
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Sen Hai is better at sauces and Future is better at green vegetarian ingredients - both are fine.

Posted on: 7/21 19:03
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Re: Two Black Folding Dahon Bikes Stolen Late Saturday night 7/15 (Newark & Brunswick)
#26
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Quote:

heights wrote:
If they ere hidden in your vehicle perhaps your auto insurance company can compensate you for the monetary loss. Also check your home owner's / rental's insurance policy for coberage as well.


Sorry to hear this! I would worry that my Homeowners would go up. Oprah aren't you a Billionaire? But still...

Posted on: 7/21 18:50
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Re: Jersey Citu Chinese food
#27
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"Jersey Citu Chinese food"

I thought it was a new place.

Posted on: 7/21 18:49
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Re: Big Chef?
#28
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Will be missed...

Posted on: 7/21 18:39
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Re: Cat named Katy TAKEN from Kennedy Dancers (Beacon & Central Ave - Heights)
#29
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Great - glad your cats defied the odds.

Posted on: 7/17 13:06
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Re: Cat named Katy TAKEN from Kennedy Dancers (Beacon & Central Ave - Heights)
#30
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Haven't had a drink in over 8 years - so unless this is some very very old story - you have the wrong person. In any event - just Google outside cats life expectancy - especially in busy Jersey City! This cat was lost on busy JFK Blvd - and article says they lost another in 2010 the same way. I give to TNR but too much goes to Pit Bull rescue and leaving cats outside in cruel and not a great answer.

Posted on: 7/17 11:37
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