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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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this article refers to east of Grand St., Mr. Morgan lives in what the broadcast referred to as Bergen Hill.

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Voyeur wrote:
Another blast from the past to calm Earl Morgan's nerves - a NYT story from June 2005 calling Bergen-Lafayette "the last undiscovered area in the New York metropolitan area."

Among the amazing projects that were about to transform the neighborhood: "thousands of new homes and apartments. The largest will be a 932-unit glassy, sail-shaped triple-tower complex on the edge of Liberty State Park." - Never happened

"A former rope factory named Whitlock Cordage is being converted into a $45 million 330-unit mixed-income housing project." - Never finished

"How hot is Lafayette? So hot that a 1,000-square-foot, two-bedroom condominium at a converted factory that closed for $285,000 on April 15 was put on the market one day later for $419,000. So hot that a two-family home on a double lot that sold for under $200,000 three years ago is getting offers of $750,000 today. So hot that a five-story 14½-foot-wide row house that two years ago went for $190,000 sold last month for $335,000." - So hot that on Trulia today east of Grand Street almost half of the homes are selling at auction following foreclosure and there are 19 properties in notice of default.

In short - Earl, I think you've not got too much to worry about from the invading white horde...

Posted on: 2016/3/24 2:08
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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Voyeur wrote:
Another blast from the past to calm Earl Morgan's nerves - a NYT story from June 2005 calling Bergen-Lafayette "the last undiscovered area in the New York metropolitan area."

Among the amazing projects that were about to transform the neighborhood: "thousands of new homes and apartments. The largest will be a 932-unit glassy, sail-shaped triple-tower complex on the edge of Liberty State Park." - Never happened

"A former rope factory named Whitlock Cordage is being converted into a $45 million 330-unit mixed-income housing project." - Never finished

"How hot is Lafayette? So hot that a 1,000-square-foot, two-bedroom condominium at a converted factory that closed for $285,000 on April 15 was put on the market one day later for $419,000. So hot that a two-family home on a double lot that sold for under $200,000 three years ago is getting offers of $750,000 today. So hot that a five-story 14½-foot-wide row house that two years ago went for $190,000 sold last month for $335,000." - So hot that on Trulia today east of Grand Street almost half of the homes are selling at auction following foreclosure and there are 19 properties in notice of default.

In short - Earl, I think you've not got too much to worry about from the invading white horde...


Hindsight can be so cruel... ;)

I lived in BeLa for eight years and really loved it, but it was excruciatingly frustrating to witness the sputtering in terms of improvements and gentrification. The Foundry did great things for the area, along with the light rail, but the crash of 2008 really did a number on the area. Condos at the Foundry appreciated like crazy (50 to 70 percent) in a matter of 3 years, then came back down to original prices.

Back around 2012 I considered buying some property and there were a ton of short sales and many distressed sales. Foreclosed properties were starting to hit the market, too. I saw some crazy deals. In the end, I couldn't quite decide what to do do, so I set aside those ideas. I still think the neighborhood will do great over time, but it sure has taken a long time.

Posted on: 2016/3/23 18:08
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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Another blast from the past to calm Earl Morgan's nerves - a NYT story from June 2005 calling Bergen-Lafayette "the last undiscovered area in the New York metropolitan area."

Among the amazing projects that were about to transform the neighborhood: "thousands of new homes and apartments. The largest will be a 932-unit glassy, sail-shaped triple-tower complex on the edge of Liberty State Park." - Never happened

"A former rope factory named Whitlock Cordage is being converted into a $45 million 330-unit mixed-income housing project." - Never finished

"How hot is Lafayette? So hot that a 1,000-square-foot, two-bedroom condominium at a converted factory that closed for $285,000 on April 15 was put on the market one day later for $419,000. So hot that a two-family home on a double lot that sold for under $200,000 three years ago is getting offers of $750,000 today. So hot that a five-story 14½-foot-wide row house that two years ago went for $190,000 sold last month for $335,000." - So hot that on Trulia today east of Grand Street almost half of the homes are selling at auction following foreclosure and there are 19 properties in notice of default.

In short - Earl, I think you've not got too much to worry about from the invading white horde...

Posted on: 2016/3/23 16:56
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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JGJDNYCJC wrote:
This thread raises some valid trends but is also missing a trend.

The folks moving to JC today frequently prefer urban living to suburban living, especially given the different types of work we do compared to 30-40 years ago that require longer hours, shorter commutes, quick access, more flexibility and creativity, and virtual work schedules.

Will the majority of folks hightail it to the burbs after a set time? Yes, always, because that's where the more sought after schools are located. But many choose to stay for the same reason that they choose to remain in Brooklyn or Queens -- proximity, diversity, short commutes, architectural variety, various other educational enrichment options. Frequently it's people with money who can buy private education or otherwise fund enrichment programs for their kids privately.

PS 16 is a crowded school in part because it has been able to bounce back quicker. PS's 37 and 5 are, anecdotally speaking, following suit as those feeder areas gentrify.

As with many things in life, follow the money.


There's a few more variables, like how receptive the local schools are to parental involvement. Involved parents were responsible for turnarounds in Park Slope and the UWS. The anecdotes I've heard about Cordero (37) are that Principal Strynar has kept parents at bay, out of "his" school.



Posted on: 2016/3/23 16:45
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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This thread raises some valid trends but is also missing a trend.

The folks moving to JC today frequently prefer urban living to suburban living, especially given the different types of work we do compared to 30-40 years ago that require longer hours, shorter commutes, quick access, more flexibility and creativity, and virtual work schedules.

Will the majority of folks hightail it to the burbs after a set time? Yes, always, because that's where the more sought after schools are located. But many choose to stay for the same reason that they choose to remain in Brooklyn or Queens -- proximity, diversity, short commutes, architectural variety, various other educational enrichment options. Frequently it's people with money who can buy private education or otherwise fund enrichment programs for their kids privately.

PS 16 is a crowded school in part because it has been able to bounce back quicker. PS's 37 and 5 are, anecdotally speaking, following suit as those feeder areas gentrify.

As with many things in life, follow the money.

Posted on: 2016/3/23 16:20
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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This story about the fall and rebirth of Paulus Hook from the Hudson Reporter way back in 2003 might be instructive regarding this discussion of moving to the suburbs. Salient portion below:

"All the families moved away," Bromirski said. "People moved away because this was definitely a working-class neighborhood. They started to get wealthier and they moved out of town. They were all blue-collar workers and as they had children, and their children started growing up, they moved out into the suburbs to give their children something better than they had. They thought moving to the suburbs was going to be better. Even to this day, they come back and visit and say they wish they still lived in Jersey City. The first thing they'll say is 'We had it so good here. Nobody was rich, nobody really had much of anything, but we didn't know it. But we enjoyed it! Everyone got along.' "

As years of neglect caused buildings to empty and wither away, the dense neighborhood became sparse, almost desolate. The King Gussie Flats, 80 units of housing over three buildings at Washington and Sussex streets, were taken down in the late 1960s. Multi-family buildings became parking lots. Companies started to move operations elsewhere. Even Colgate-Palmolive began to slowly phase out its operations. The neighborhood became an eyesore, and it seemed as if no one cared for it much.



Posted on: 2016/3/23 15:29
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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Quote:

La_Verdad wrote:
Quote:

VanVorster wrote:
Gentrification is inevitable as we become an increasingly urbanized country with people leaving the suburbs and flocking to cities.


Maybe, maybe not. These things have historically been cyclical and there is a school of thought that we are in another cycle. I do think there are factors that likely give this cycle more legs but the same evolutionary pull that drives young people to cities also leads them out once they breed. Unless and until the JC public schools can credibly compete with suburban schools, that isn't likely to change in a meaningful way...


Have U.S. Cities Reached 'Peak Millennial'?
The demographic case for preparing now for the next urban population decline, even in growing cities.

NATALIE DELGADILLO @ndelgadillo07 Mar 16, 2016 58

For all the talk of city-loving Millennials, some surveys show that plenty of them actually prefer the suburbs overall, and still plan to move there eventually. Census data released last year suggests that the suburban shift may merely be being delayed, not foregone: while Americans aged 25 to 29 are moving to the suburbs today at a slower rate than they did in the mid-1990s, those aged 30 to 44 are moving there at a faster one.

USC urban planning professor Dowell Myers is among the doubters. At the University of Texas City Forum last month, he ventured that cities have reached “peak Millennial,” or the highest influx and presence of Millennials living in urban areas—and, he argues, it’s only going down from here.

What is “peak Millennial”?

In 2015, those Millennials born in 1990—the largest cohort born in any one year—turned 25. Myers argues this is an important milestone, marking the year that Millennials begin to take their housing and work situations more seriously. Many of them have already made the jump from their parents’ homes or college into a city-center, where they’re living independently and focusing on their careers. “At this age, you’re likely a single adult who’s been out of college for a little while,” Myers says. “And you’re starting to get more serious about establishing your independent adult life.”

This group of Millennials, along with all the ones that came before, Myers says, have been flowing into cities and causing a spike in the urban population. But from now on, there will be fewer young people moving into cities, because there will simply be fewer of them period. If you imagine the inflow of young people to cities as a faucet in a bathtub, Myers says, that faucet has been turned up higher and higher for the last decade or so. But now, it’s finally being slightly turned down by the dip in total youth population numbers. Additionally, as the largest group of Millennials grows older, many of them will begin to make the shift into suburban family life.

See rest of story: http://www.citylab.com/housing/2016/0 ... ties-dowell-myers/473061/


There are 2 events that usually send people to the burbs, one would be the birth of the second or third child and the realization that the 2br/2bth they bought is not large enough to accommodate them. The second is when the oldest child becomes of school age. This is when parents take a serious look at the conditions of the local schools.

Posted on: 2016/3/23 14:36
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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Quote:

VanVorster wrote:
Gentrification is inevitable as we become an increasingly urbanized country with people leaving the suburbs and flocking to cities.


Maybe, maybe not. These things have historically been cyclical and there is a school of thought that we are in another cycle. I do think there are factors that likely give this cycle more legs but the same evolutionary pull that drives young people to cities also leads them out once they breed. Unless and until the JC public schools can credibly compete with suburban schools, that isn't likely to change in a meaningful way...


Have U.S. Cities Reached 'Peak Millennial'?
The demographic case for preparing now for the next urban population decline, even in growing cities.

NATALIE DELGADILLO @ndelgadillo07 Mar 16, 2016 58

For all the talk of city-loving Millennials, some surveys show that plenty of them actually prefer the suburbs overall, and still plan to move there eventually. Census data released last year suggests that the suburban shift may merely be being delayed, not foregone: while Americans aged 25 to 29 are moving to the suburbs today at a slower rate than they did in the mid-1990s, those aged 30 to 44 are moving there at a faster one.

USC urban planning professor Dowell Myers is among the doubters. At the University of Texas City Forum last month, he ventured that cities have reached “peak Millennial,” or the highest influx and presence of Millennials living in urban areas—and, he argues, it’s only going down from here.

What is “peak Millennial”?

In 2015, those Millennials born in 1990—the largest cohort born in any one year—turned 25. Myers argues this is an important milestone, marking the year that Millennials begin to take their housing and work situations more seriously. Many of them have already made the jump from their parents’ homes or college into a city-center, where they’re living independently and focusing on their careers. “At this age, you’re likely a single adult who’s been out of college for a little while,” Myers says. “And you’re starting to get more serious about establishing your independent adult life.”

This group of Millennials, along with all the ones that came before, Myers says, have been flowing into cities and causing a spike in the urban population. But from now on, there will be fewer young people moving into cities, because there will simply be fewer of them period. If you imagine the inflow of young people to cities as a faucet in a bathtub, Myers says, that faucet has been turned up higher and higher for the last decade or so. But now, it’s finally being slightly turned down by the dip in total youth population numbers. Additionally, as the largest group of Millennials grows older, many of them will begin to make the shift into suburban family life.

See rest of story: http://www.citylab.com/housing/2016/0 ... ties-dowell-myers/473061/

Posted on: 2016/3/23 14:11
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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hero69 wrote:
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brewster wrote:
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hero69 wrote:
where is irvington? i thought newark was the area's armpit.


Irvington is between Newark & Maplewood. Picture Newark without the glamour.
that's sad because newark is ugly.


That's the joke

Posted on: 2016/3/23 2:13
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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Newark, specifically near Penn Station, is undergoing it's own revitalization/gentrification. The fact that a whole foods and starbucks are opening nearby is a stereotypical telling of that.

Posted on: 2016/3/23 2:09
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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brewster wrote:
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hero69 wrote:
where is irvington? i thought newark was the area's armpit.


Irvington is between Newark & Maplewood. Picture Newark without the glamour.
that's sad because newark is ugly.

Posted on: 2016/3/23 2:03
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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hero69 wrote:
where is irvington? i thought newark was the area's armpit.


Irvington is between Newark & Maplewood. Picture Newark without the glamour.

Posted on: 2016/3/23 1:51
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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speaking of gentrification. has it started in paterson and east orange yet?


I was on Lyons Ave in Irvington yesterday by the White Castle. It hasn't started there. When it does, it'll be close to the end. Because that's the very last place anyone would want to live.
where is irvington? i thought newark was the area's armpit.

Posted on: 2016/3/23 1:47
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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hero69 wrote:
speaking of gentrification. has it started in paterson and east orange yet?


I was on Lyons Ave in Irvington yesterday by the White Castle. It hasn't started there. When it does, it'll be close to the end. Because that's the very last place anyone would want to live.

Posted on: 2016/3/23 0:02
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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speaking of gentrification. has it started in paterson and east orange yet?

Posted on: 2016/3/22 22:50
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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Gentrification is inevitable as we become an increasingly urbanized country with people leaving the suburbs and flocking to cities. I grew up in the burbs as did most of the people in my building. I think there's a way to be a gentrifier without being a jerk about it -- which I've readily observed on here (e.g., "When are these Ricans leaving?, We're the good people and we raise property values" etc."). Gentrification isn't necessarily bad. It's only bad when you displace en masse and concentrate poverty in certain zipcodes, such that some places don't benefit from development.

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/201 ... 20-ways-not-be-gentrifier

Posted on: 2016/3/22 21:16
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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iGreg wrote:
Did Earl Morgan just complain about White People moving into the hood ?



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He did. But what got to me more is the old "I've lived here all my life" canard raised it's tired head. We are talking about a city here - not some small town where everyone can't wait to get away, but a natural environment for change and renewal.

I was also taken aback by the comment from one of the students, about crime intensifying in some neighborhoods as people - who? - are priced out of an area and compressed into ever fewer, smaller, "poor" neighborhoods. IMO, it's hard to argue against gentrification if this is true - should Jersey City, or any city for that matter, go out of it's way to accommodate the bad apples?

Posted on: 2016/3/22 18:08
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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This topic sickens me whenever it comes up. There are minority neighborhoods in the city that have been brainwashed into automatically associating the word gentrification with all bad things. The dubious desire is to restrict newcomers into coming into the neighborhood, which is nearly impossible, anti-American and almost like reverse redlining: illegal.

Gentrification has a lot of positives - one of them is it usually leads to new jobs as businesses open up along with an increase in the tax base which allows for the city to provide better services and safer communities. Can anyone honestly say they would rather live in the un-gentrified Jersey City of the 80s rather than the city today? Of course there are negative aspects of gentrification. The main one is it usually leads to a rapid increase in rents for existing residents, whom are forced out if on a limited income.

It's basic law of supply and demand. If a neighborhood starts becoming hot and new residents move in, the existing residents should be advocating for new developments to house the new people and to direct growth to underutilized areas though zoning changes. Just like what's being done in Journal Square. This was the older units stay affordable and the newer units can accommodate the influx of new residents. The second the supply and demand equation gets out of balance, rents will rise. This is why I'm a strong advocate for upzoning in the heights. The R1 zoning is gonna kill a lot of existing residents along with the character of the community. The area is starting to become very popular with ex-New Yorkers, and in response we're just tearing down older two-family homes and replacing it with a luxury one. We would be much better severed as a community if we could get housing for four families, or more, rather than just a couple of ex-New Yorkers. The R1 zoning prevents that.

There is no way to stop gentrification unless an area and its residents are intentionally kept down... so let's do something in response to gentrification to mitigate the negative effects from it!!

Posted on: 2016/3/22 16:08
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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marullos88 wrote:
Yeah, Earl Morgan made some "interesting" comments here.


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Posted on: 2016/3/22 13:35
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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Yeah, Earl Morgan made some "interesting" comments here.

Posted on: 2016/3/22 13:24
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Re: NJTV News on JC gentrification
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Did Earl Morgan just complain about White People moving into the hood ?



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Posted on: 2016/3/22 11:55
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NJTV News on JC gentrification
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