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Re: Pulaski Skyway Update For Commuters
#1
Home away from home
Home away from home


ah, a nice new rail tunnel would be nice

Posted on: 4/21 18:21
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Re: Christie is just inept; Jersey is being taken for a ride.
#2
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Now there's controversy over his pension reform.

http://pando.com/2014/04/18/chris-chr ... t-threatens-to-sue-pando/

Chris Christie’s $300m pension proposal broke state anti-corruption laws (And now the intended recipient threatens to sue Pando)

A PandoDaily investigation has discovered evidence that Gov. Chris Christie’s pending deal to award a $300 million pension management contract to a controversial hedge fund is in violation of state anti-corruption laws.

New Jersey state pay-to-play statutes prohibit state contractors from directly or indirectly financially supporting the election campaigns of state officials. Those statutes also explicitly prohibit the use of outside groups or family members to circumvent that ban.

Additionally, separate Department of Treasury rules appear to prohibit public pension contracts from being awarded to investment firms whose employees have made significant financial contributions to political entities organized to operate in New Jersey state elections. Those laws also bar investment firms doing business with the state from making contributions “for the purpose of influencing any election for State office.”

Yet, late last month, the New Jersey State Investment Council moved to award a controversial $300 million investment contract to Chatham Asset Management, despite the fact that Chatham’s principal, and a woman living at his address and sharing his surname, donated more than $50,000 to a Republican election group that oversaw major portions of Gov. Christie’s 2013 re-election operation. The proposed investment is already highly controversial given the hedge fund also reportedly owns a stake in the Atlantic City casino, Revel....

Posted on: 4/19 11:59
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Re: MXYPLYZYK - retail store on Grove Street
#3
Home away from home
Home away from home


i just think grove generated enuff foot traffic. i hope they can find something in manhattan that is affordable. i think even hoboken would have been better.

Posted on: 4/17 13:17
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Re: Christie is just inept; Jersey is being taken for a ride.
#4
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Home away from home


more evidence of christie's ineptitude. more proof that nj needed anoither tunnel into manhattan

Christie Rail Kill Misses Lowest Rates as N.J. Lags U.S.
By Tom Moroney and Elise Young - Apr 16, 2014
The moonscape highways around Fort Lee, New Jersey, have left cracked axles, bent rims and chunks of tire strewn across the lot at George Washington Bridge Towing. While the traffic jams Governor Chris Christie’s crew engineered here are gone, these broken vehicle parts show that the consequences of their boss’s economic choices endure.

As a thriller, the gridlock ordered up at the approaches to the world’s busiest span is tough to beat: e-mailed hints of retribution, a soured romance, prosecutors probing for links to a potential presidential candidate.

More consequential, as the 51-year-old Republican pushes a $34.4 billion budget in which debt mostly precludes new spending, is Christie’s cancellation in 2010 of a commuter rail tunnel, scuttling the creation of at least 200,000 jobs. With the money he diverted to protect the Transportation Trust Fund and avoid increasing the gas tax almost gone, New Jersey’s strangled train and road system is thwarting its recovery.

“For an economy, it’s death by a thousand cuts,” said Philip Fischer, the head of municipal bond research in New York for Bank of America Corp.

Even with the promise of $3 billion in U.S. aid for the tunnel, Christie said he didn’t want to burden taxpayers with an open checkbook. A federal report later disputed his numbers and concluded there was no evidence it would cost the $14 billion or more he said it would.

Borrowing Costs

Initial estimates of the project’s cost rose to $12.4 billion at the time it was killed from $7.4 billion in 2006. Whatever the price tag, Fischer said, the most persuasive argument for the Hudson River tunnel was the historically low cost of borrowing.

Average interest rates across the U.S. on municipal bonds, designed for such public projects, hover at about 4.3 percent, close to the lowest level since the 1960s and down from a 13.3 percent peak in 1981. Issuing $12.4 billion of 20-year bonds today would cost $23 billion in principal and annual interest over the life of the debt. That’s a savings of $4.2 billion from the average 6 percent rate during the past five decades.

“The rule is, when the market gives it to you, you should take it,” Fischer said.

Freedom of movement is central to the economy and politics of New Jersey, the most densely populated U.S. state with 8.9 million people. Almost 15 percent of commuters spend 60 minutes or more getting to work, compared with a national average of 8.1 percent, U.S. Census data show. No state sends more people beyond its borders for jobs, 548,000, with about 73 percent bound for New York.

‘Extra Burden’

The state’s chemical, pharmaceutical and other large industries rely on the roads and trains, as do millions of others passing through. Or failing to, in the case of crumbling infrastructure.

Christie disagrees that job growth would follow better roads funded by a higher gas tax, said Michael Drewniak, a spokesman for the governor. The argument “washes both ways,” Drewniak said in a telephone interview.

“It puts an extra burden on commerce and people’s wallets,” he said. “The governor’s point is more looking at our entire economy.”

One troubling, if not definitive, sign of the connection between poor infrastructure and lost jobs can be found in the state’s employment numbers. From January 2010, when Christie took office, through December 2013, New Jersey’s number of private-sector jobs increased by 3.5 percent, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data. At the same time, New York’s grew 7.7 percent while the nation’s increased by 7.8 percent.

‘Biggest Vulnerability’

Christie’s “biggest vulnerability going forward as a political entity -- leaving Bridgegate out for a second -- is New Jersey’s standing in economic growth among states,” said Ed Rendell, the co-chairman of Building America’s Future, a Washington-based bipartisan group seeking higher transportation spending, and the former Democratic governor of Pennsylvania.

Harder evidence of job loss exists in the tunnel project Christie halted in October 2010.

Called Access to the Region’s Core, the tunnel was just part of New Jersey’s need for public investment, according to a 2013 report from a bipartisan group of government executives. It recommended spending $70 billion on aging state infrastructure described as “decayed,” with $21.3 billion going for transportation.

A second report, by the American Society of Civil Engineers, painted a depressing picture of New Jersey’s major roads. Sixty-six percent are in poor or mediocre condition, resulting in an extra $3.48 billion annually in repairs for motorists, or $601 each.

Stranded Motorists

“So many this year, it was crazy,” said Kazem George, 36, a tow-truck driver at George Washington Bridge Towing who sees stranded motorists pony up hundreds of dollars in tows and repairs and, in some cases, lose hours from work and school.

Mike Giacomarro, 26, blames Christie.

“I never used to mind the guy,” said the Allendale resident, until early March when he hit a pothole that set him back $275.

“I’m not expecting the roads to be perfect,” said Giacomarro, who commutes to Metropolitan College of New York in Manhattan. “But if I’m going to pay $17 to get over the bridge, I better be able to get to the bridge.”

Christie, who won re-election in November carrying 19 of 21 counties and 61 percent of the vote, has seen his approval ratings plummet 20 percentage points over the bridge scandal.

‘Got It’

Former Deputy Chief of Staff Bridget Anne Kelly and David Wildstein, an ex-Christie ally at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, were responsible for the September closings in Fort Lee, where a Democratic mayor didn’t endorse the governor, according to a report last month by lawyers for the administration.

Kelly sent an Aug. 13 e-mail to Wildstein that said: “Time for some traffic problems in Fort Lee.” Wildstein, who ordered the lanes closed, replied: “Got it.”

The report revealed that Kelly and William Stepien, Christie’s former campaign manager, had a personal relationship that Stepien ended, suggesting they weren’t communicating when the plan was hatched.

State lawmakers are investigating, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman convened a grand jury in Newark and in Manhattan, District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. is examining whether the bi-state agency that runs the bridge had improperly financed a range of major construction projects.

‘Never-Ending Hook’

Christie came to Trenton promising to end an era of borrowing that engendered the nation’s highest property taxes and led its pension fund to near collapse. The retirement shortfall had reached $53.9 billion after a decade of expanded benefits and missed payments.

The new governor vowed to “tear up the state’s credit card,” raised workers’ retirement age and made them pay more toward their benefits.

When Christie canceled the tunnel, which would have more than doubled peak-hour service to 48 trains per hour, he said, “I simply cannot put the taxpayers of the state of New Jersey on what would be a never-ending hook.”

The expense was to be shared among the Port Authority, the federal government and the state, which was to pay 14.4 percent.

The tunnel would have led to $9 billion in business activity and $1.5 billion in federal, state and local tax revenue during nine years of construction, according to a March 2012 report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. It would have generated 59,900 jobs on site and 98,300 in the region while work was under way, plus 44,000 jobs when the tunnel was done.

Kearny Boon

More jobs would have meant higher revenue from income taxes. New Jersey collected $1,257 in state individual income tax per capita in fiscal 2012, according to the Tax Foundation, a non-profit research group in Washington. At that rate, 44,000 permanent positions would have generated about $55.3 million a year in new income taxes.

In Kearny, where 41,400 people live alongside three former industrial properties classified as Superfund sites by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the tunnel held promise to spark a revival, according to a 2009 redevelopment study by the Regional Plan Association, a New York-based urban-research group focusing on the metropolitan area.

New Jersey Transit, the state’s bus and rail agency, would revive a defunct rail line with direct service into Manhattan. The Hudson County town stood to gain as many as 1,400 residential units, a 10 percent increase from 2010, plus retail and office space, according to the study’s projections.

23 Minutes

With the project dead, the Port Authority redirected money to New Jersey, relieving pressure on the state’s transportation fund. The agency spent or earmarked $1.8 billion on road projects including the Pulaski Skyway. Manhattan-bound lanes on the 82-year-old bridge are closed during reconstruction.

By 2030, mass-transit demand between New Jersey and Manhattan is expected to increase 38 percent, according to the GAO report. Access to the Region’s Core would have added two tunnels alongside two single tracks now operating at capacity. The result would have cut transfers 97 percent and taken an average 23 minutes off each trip.

New Jersey’s gas tax, the second-lowest in the nation after Alaska’s, is the largest source of money for the transportation fund, created in 1984 to issue debt for capital improvements to highways and public-transportation systems.

Now, as Christie’s fiscal 2015 budget is considered in Trenton, the transportation fund has $14.4 billion in outstanding bonds and just $160 million cash on hand. About $520 million in annual revenue from the 14.5-cent-per-gallon levy goes toward debt service, leaving nothing for new projects.

National Benefits

New Jersey drivers pay an average $3.40 per gallon of gasoline, according to AAA figures, compared with $3.80 in New York and $3.63 nationwide.

Christie’s decision to scuttle the rail project benefited an aspiring national political figure in two ways, said Martin Robins, the tunnel’s original project director and director emeritus of the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University in New Brunswick.

“He could live by his pledge to both fund the Transportation Trust Fund and not raise the gasoline tax,” Robins said. “Second, it positioned him, from a national political perspective, as the spokesperson against the idea that public-works projects were a proper response to the recession.”

Mead, Corbett

Other Republican governors as careful as Christie about cultivating their conservative bona fides have reversed course and increased their gas tax. Wyoming Governor Matt Mead signed into law a 10-cent boost in February. Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett endorsed legislation last November to bolster state highway, bridges and mass-transit spending by $2.3 billion a year. He expects to collect the money from motorist fees and an increase in the state’s wholesale gas tariff.

New Jersey’s road conditions are worsened by the sheer volume of cars and trucks. Diaz Damian, fueling his tractor trailer at the Vince Lombardi Service Area on the New Jersey Turnpike, remembered a recent afternoon when he waited so long in traffic that he lost a cargo pickup in Jersey City.

“I spent $130 worth of gas and I never got there,” said Damian, 40.

The delays apply not only to those behind the wheel. Of the half million people who travel from New Jersey each day to work in New York or Philadelphia, many get there by bus and train.

“We just never know,” Mike McKenna said of the unpredictability of his trip from the suburb of Basking Ridge. The two-hour trip on New Jersey Transit may take as long as three hours.

Productivity Drag

The anxiety that comes with these glitches has been linked to lower job productivity by Richard Wener, an environmental psychology professor. Wener teaches at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University in Brooklyn and gets there by train from Maplewood. His commute was, in fact, the genesis of his study.

Before Maplewood was connected directly by train to Penn Station in New York in the late 1990s, he had to switch trains. After Midtown Direct service began, the township’s property values went up and Wener himself felt better when he arrived at work. His study results confirmed his own experience: the less hassle in the trip, the happier the commuter.

“When people have a more stressful commute, they are more irritable and they have more days when they miss work,” he said. “That’s a drag on productivity.”

To contact the reporters on this story: Tom Moroney in Boston at tmorrone@bloomberg.net; Elise Young in NJ Statehouse at

Posted on: 4/17 4:57
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Re: One Year After Sandy has anything changed?
#5
Home away from home
Home away from home


hopefully, looks at this site and is thinking about this but i doubt it. i suppose he's gonna let ms. zimmer take the lead on this...politicians are lame

Posted on: 4/17 4:24
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Re: One Year After Sandy has anything changed?
#6
Home away from home
Home away from home


I just read an interestin article in NYT magazine about how Dutch cities build huge reservoirs beneath new parking garages for water run-off. I like that innovative thinking. Is Jersey City looking into this

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/13/mag ... y-world.html?ref=magazine


Posted on: 4/17 3:50
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Re: Zagat's 7 reasons to take the train to Jersey City
#7
Home away from home
Home away from home


yeah...tell me about it. the name "6th Borough" is so lacking in originality/imagination.

Posted on: 4/16 10:28
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Christie is just inept; Jersey is being taken for a ride.
#8
Home away from home
Home away from home


Instead of raising taxes a little, Christie just giving money away - to institutional investors, that is

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04 ... owngrade-larkin-says.html

N.J. Tobacco Move May Prompt More Downgrades, Larkin Says
By Elise Young

New Jersey’s move to raise $96 million by pledging tobacco-settlement revenue to investors may lead to additional downgrades after Standard & Poor’s cut the state’s rating this week, according to Herbert J. Sims & Co.

Governor Chris Christie’s administration has sacrificed $385 million over 10 years in a tobacco-bond refinancing for a one-time infusion to cover current expenses, according to an analysis by Richard Larkin, director of credit analysis at the Fairfield, Connecticut-based company.

Posted on: 4/13 7:26
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Re: Perfect timing: Newark Airport AirTrain closed May 1 - July 15
#9
Home away from home
Home away from home


i like the #62 bus but sometimes it can get very crowded. it's a shame there is no bus from hobken or jsq

Posted on: 4/9 21:55
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Re: Planning Board recommends 100 foot height increase for McGinley Square building
#10
Home away from home
Home away from home


i am saying that if williamsburg doesn't/can't support a big screen theater, then i definitely do not see how mcginley square can support one especially since it is not hear a transporation hub and it is not a major destination. let's be realistic, hoboken only has 1 big theater, jersey city already has 2 and there are jsut several megaplex theaters in brooklyn which is far bigger than jersey city

Posted on: 4/9 11:21
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Re: Planning Board recommends 100 foot height increase for McGinley Square building
#11
Home away from home
Home away from home


i worry about mcginley square reaching critical mass, as opposed to jsq. and does mcginley square really need a 13-screen cinema. they don't even have that in williamsburg.

Posted on: 4/9 10:11
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Re: Planning Board recommends 100 foot height increase for McGinley Square building
#12
Home away from home
Home away from home


sounds good to me except i wonder if mcginley sqaure needs a 13-screen cinema when i thought efforts were being made to turn journal square into a culture/entertainmet hub

Posted on: 4/9 8:19
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Re: Newark Ave to become Pedestrian Plaza
#13
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Home away from home


with the pulaski skyway closing, even more reason to create the pedestrian plaza to try to keep as much additional traffic out of JC.

The Port Authority should really be trying to encourage car pooling by having dedicated lanes, discounts such as in california

Posted on: 4/9 0:14
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Re: Whitlock Cordage Interrupted?
#14
Home away from home
Home away from home


is whitlock cordage open yet?

Posted on: 4/8 15:00
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Re: Newark Ave to become Pedestrian Plaza
#15
Home away from home
Home away from home


muy fantastico idea

Posted on: 4/8 11:05
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Re: Dog Shit
#16
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Home away from home


someone should set up a camera to record

Posted on: 4/7 18:35
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Re: Anyone want to sell 2brm?
#17
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Home away from home


what about JC Heights around Ogden, Congress

Posted on: 4/7 17:15
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Libetry harbor North
#18
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Home away from home


Joshua, chapter 7, verse 23: and another tower shall rise in Jersey City.

I'm surprised at how tall this is.

http://newyorkyimby.com/neighborhoods/jersey-city

Click to see original Image in a new window

Click to see original Image in a new window

Posted on: 4/5 17:08
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Re: Brooklyn Chef's Goods & Greens replaces DOCO Market in HP
#19
Home away from home
Home away from home


serious;y, if i'm paying $10 for a baguette, there'd better not be a tip jar at the register!

Posted on: 4/5 13:28
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Re: Daniel Wrieden aka 'Queer Eye For The Historic House Guy'
#20
Home away from home
Home away from home


I agree that dan is needed to prevent people from doing silly stuff, especially developers.
everytime I walk by that new apartment building on wayne and barrow, I shudder at the
terrible parapet - it has no detail and is so out of character with the rest of nab. new is fine
imo, but not trashy. btw, has anyone seen the new house at
93 bright street which is awesome - too bad its so far away.

Click to see original Image in a new window

Posted on: 4/4 11:38
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Re: Daniel Wrieden aka 'Queer Eye For The Historic House Guy'
#21
Home away from home
Home away from home


Iink Brooklyn and Hoboken have far more pragmatic historic preservation policies, from what I have heard. maybe something for someone to bring to Fulop's attention and maybe the City can make the process better for all.

Posted on: 4/4 9:55
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NY State - Cuomo won't use state money for college classes in NY prisons
#22
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Home away from home


It's a shame because this was a wonderful idea. Instead of people yelling " NO Attica University", people should be begging for it.

Cuomo Drops Plan to Use State Money to Pay for College Classes for Inmates
In an important speech at a gathering of black and Latino lawmakers in February, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo unveiled what he billed as a bold plan to attack the problem of high rates of recidivism: The state would pay for college classes for prison inmates.

But six weeks later, after lawmakers approved the state budget this week, the governor acknowledged that his highly promoted proposal, which his advisers talked up as a major advancement in criminal justice policy, was so politically controversial that he would no longer pursue using public money to finance it.

The abrupt decision was a rare political retreat by Mr. Cuomo, a careful student of public opinion polls and legislative sentiment who has generally avoided the kinds of miscalculations about hot-button issues that can easily trip up a chief executive.

At a news conference on Tuesday to celebrate passage of the budget, Mr. Cuomo said he had decided against seeking public money for the prison classes because of opposition from lawmakers, particularly in the State Senate, who pointed out that many law-abiding families are struggling to pay for college.

“I understand the sentiment,” the governor said. “I don’t agree with it, but I understand it, and I understand the appearance of it.”

Mr. Cuomo, a Democrat, had proposed creating publicly-funded college programs at 10 state prisons. His office estimated the program would cost $1 million in the first year, a minuscule sum in a state whose corrections agency has an operating budget of $2.8 billion.

College programs in prisons dwindled two decades ago after President Bill Clinton signed legislation denying Pell grants for inmates. Gov. George E. Pataki, a Republican, later made prisoners ineligible for New York’s Tuition Assistance Program, cutting off another source of public funding.

New York currently offers college programs in more than a dozen state prisons, funded mostly with private money, though a small amount of public money has been used. Mr. Cuomo wants to create a state program to build upon those offerings so more inmates can participate and earn degrees. A study by the RAND Corporation last year found that inmates who participated in education programs while incarcerated had much lower odds of returning to prison.

“Let’s stop this cycle of a society that incarcerates more people than any industrialized nation on the globe,” Mr. Cuomo said when he unveiled his proposal.

Mr. Cuomo takes care to choreograph announcements to maximize media coverage and to amass public support, but in this case, the rollout was atypically rocky — Republican lawmakers immediately began ridiculing the idea, and the opposition continued to mount even after the governor’s office lined up supporters to endorse it publicly.

At one point, during a stop near Buffalo, Mr. Cuomo was even asked by a reporter what he would say to Yoko Ono if Mark David Chapman, who murdered John Lennon and is imprisoned Western New York, sought a college education. (He did not directly respond.)

In Albany, lawmakers started petitions to collect signatures from constituents who oppose the idea, including one with the title “Hell No to Attica University.” The State Senate, which is controlled by Republicans and a group of independent Democrats, included in its draft of the budget a provision that forbade the use of state money to pay for college degree programs in prisons unless inmates pay the full tuition.

Continue reading the main story

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The idea provoked outrage in Washington: Three Republican congressmen from upstate New York introduced what they called the Kids Before Cons Act, which would prevent federal money from being used to pay for college classes for federal or state prison inmates.

The proposal also gave fodder to Rob Astorino, the Westchester County executive, who is campaigning to unseat Mr. Cuomo in November. During a recent visit to Buffalo, Mr. Astorino, a Republican, spoke about how he and his wife were saving to pay for their children to go to college. “Maybe our 10-year-old son, we should sit him down and explain how to rob a bank,” Mr. Astorino said.

A Siena College poll conducted last month found that 53 percent of voters supported the governor’s proposal, compared with 43 percent who opposed it. But the poll found strong opposition among some groups: 68 percent of Republicans, and 66 percent of upstate voters.

A spokesman for Mr. Cuomo, Matt Wing, said on Wednesday that several private donors had expressed interest in providing financial backing for the program the governor had proposed. He said administration officials were considering a plan in which the state corrections department would accept the grants and donations for the program.

Supporters of the program said they found the backlash to be dispiriting.

“For a lot of politicians, it’s just like rolling off a log to demagogue on this issue,” said Robert Gangi, a former executive director of the Correctional Association of New York. “To make claims that we’re soft on crime or coddling prisoners, it’s really a kind of know-nothing politics.”

Assemblyman Daniel J. O’Donnell, a Manhattan Democrat and the chairman of the Correction Committee, said prison superintendents had repeatedly asked him to push to expand the college offerings in their facilities.

“The people who run the prisons want it,” he said. “The prisoners’ lives are improved. The prisons are made safer. So who exactly is opposed to this?”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/03/nyr ... l?hpw&rref=education&_r=0

Posted on: 4/3 10:47
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Re: "UDrive. UText. UPay."
#23
Home away from home
Home away from home


great ideas about the fines. people should turn the phones off while driving

Posted on: 4/2 8:33
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Re: Obamacare...creating more working poor.
#24
Home away from home
Home away from home


what's funny is that there used to be decent public clinics in the us in the 60's or 70's.....i don't think they exist any more

Posted on: 4/1 20:54
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Re: Obamacare...creating more working poor.
#25
Home away from home
Home away from home


guess what, joe billionaire made $1 billion in 2009 but on;y paid $100,000 in taxes! Yet he had the nerve to apply for unemployment after being laid off

Posted on: 4/1 9:38
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Re: Obamacare...creating more working poor.
#26
Home away from home
Home away from home


These people are as bad as me in waiting to the last minute to file my taxes.


Click to see original Image in a new window

http://www.washingtonpost.com/nationa ... 2b1245_story.html?hpid=z4

Posted on: 4/1 6:00
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Re: Obamacare...creating more working poor.
#27
Home away from home
Home away from home


in another sign of obamacare's failings, the federal system stopped working today and it is doubtful that the plan will reach its goals. so sad!

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/01/us/ ... -last-enrollment-day.html

Posted on: 3/31 10:26
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Re: Fields Development Reports Waldo Lofts Now 90% Sold in Jersey City's Powerhouse Arts District
#28
Home away from home
Home away from home


as jc's reputation and ammenities improve, i'd venture to guess that many will decide to take the very LOOOONG leap across the Hudson to the New Territories.

Posted on: 3/30 21:19
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Re: Trump Plaza - Jersey City
#29
Home away from home
Home away from home


this was probably grandfathered

Posted on: 3/30 15:08
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Re: Chris Christie 'Suspiciously Connected' To Revenge Traffic Jam
#30
Home away from home
Home away from home


you can put makeup on a pig, but it's still a pig

Click to see original Image in a new window

Posted on: 3/29 2:57
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