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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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I am thinking of buying an apartment and was wondering if anyone knew is the property tax amount based on the price the property is listed for or is it based on the price that the property actually sells for? Thanks!

Posted on: 2009/2/16 3:20
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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As a politician, policy maker and citizen, Healy has been a total failure.

Not much can be added.....

Posted on: 2009/2/13 18:00
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Jersey Journal Editorial
IN OUR OPINION

What can Healy say about city?
Tuesday, February 10, 2009
L ater this month, it is expected that Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy will deliver a State of the City speech. There has been no announcement that he will, but he did one last year late in February and, after all, this is an election year.

It will be his most important speech of his political career. The only question is whether he sees the same city that his constituents view every day.

Yesterday, Mayor Cory Booker of Newark gave his report on his municipality. Any positive movement was a big step for a city that once seemed desolate and unmanageable.

Jersey City's neighbor has improved its economic condition, even though it still has one of the highest urban employment rates in the state during a national recession. Crime is down but still exists. Yet, in that city, local residents are developing pride in the administration's achievements.

But is it all true? Obviously, they have a long way to go, but Newark residents say they see life getting better in their city.

In his last State of the City address, Healy called public safety his "number one issue" in Jersey City. The mayor also cited the December 2007 unemployment rate of 5.1 percent - compared to 8.2 percent in January 2004 - as proof of job creation in the city. He wants more open spaces.

While the mayor said the municipal tax rate remained stable, Downtown Councilman Fulop charged at the time that property taxes have increased 35 percent in the last three years under Healy.

Like residents in Newark, Jersey City's people know how well this administration is serving them.

The latest quarterly tax bill is high.The public does not trust city crime statistics. The recession and accompanying collapse of investment firms have not helped the city's unemployment picture. The Powerhouse Arts district vision is blurred,there is not a great deal of affordable housing being constructed, and the Journal Square development is stalled.

It would seem that Mayor Healy has a difficult speech writing task ahead of him. All the people want to know is whether there is any light at the end of the tunnel.

Posted on: 2009/2/13 17:45
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Pension deferral is budget's big 'if'
Thursday, February 12, 200920
O n Monday, the Jersey City City Council introduced a nearly half-billion-dollar budget by an 8-0 vote. This newspaper must assume the unanimous vote was out of courtesy because as it stands, this fiscal year budget that ends June 30 may bring future fiscal problems.
This $460 million spending plan is on its face illegal, if approved. The introduced budget makes a big assumption - and municipalities can not legally make such a huge supposition.
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City officials took into account a deferral of half its pension funding obligations for the year. By excluding payments into pension accounts, Jersey City hopes to save nearly $15 million.
There is one problem. The state Legislature has yet to approve a bill under considerat ion that would allow municipalities to defer those pension payments. This is no small oversight.
The city is anxious to avoid the multimillion-dollar obligation, which would translate into a tax increase that would sting in an election year.
Still, it is hard to believe the city is acting unilaterally. Can local officials believe that the state would OK the city's budget with a pension deferral as a component of the calculations?
The measure in Trenton faces stiff opposition by legislators who believe the already underfunded public employees pension system has been hurt by recent ill-advised state investments. More investment losses are expected as the national economy and Wall Street continue to stagger. Critics rightfully charge that Gov. Jon Corzine's plan to allow municipalities to not pay a half-billion dollars into pension accounts over a three-year period could put the system in danger of collapsing.
Jersey City officials should also be aware that Senate Majority Leader Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester, is against the bill. Here in Hudson County, veteran Sen. Nicholas Sacco, D-North Bergen, is a big opponent of the measure and Jersey City should take any promises by the state administration that Sacco will agree with the bill with a big grain of salt.
Also lined up against the proposal are the state's police and fire unions, a formidable lobby.
Jersey City should come up with a more realistic budget - one that should20not rely on one-shot deals or major cuts in social programs. Officials should accept that the use of smoke and mirrors is becoming too obvious.

Posted on: 2009/2/12 15:42
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Quote:

Shadow wrote:
Gee, and I thought all that big, old development going on would make the taxes smaller for us strapped homeowners & the like but I guess we also have to pay for the 300 new cops Healy hired. You've seen them, right?



The only time you're going to see them is right before an election. What I do see though is a 30% + increase in my taxes. Add to that the amount of arrests within the Healy camp (he has two on his belt already).

Change that I can see? Please get off the Obama wagon.
Have one on me Healy. Maybe a drink will make this all go away.........

Posted on: 2009/2/12 2:39
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Re: Editorial from today's JJ 2.6.2009
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"Don't expect load will lighten later"

The Jersey Journal editorial from February 6,2009 offers an excellent insight into the fiscal irresponsibility shown by some members of our current municipal government.I can guess only two reasons for a mellow response so far on this topic.Either most posters here are very wealthy and it makes little impact on your finances or you are renting and the 28% increase has not trickled down YET to your monthly rent paid.So either congratulations or start putting aside a little more money each month to compensate for the eventual increases.I for one am outraged by a 28 % increase.How many people actually get a 28% pay raise from their employer at the begining of a new year,none but the most fortunate.It is also inconceivable to imagine a city having a budget eight monthes old that is not yet approved.This is ridiculous!Let's spell it out in case anyone has'nt gotten it yet-

TWENTY EIGHT PERCENT

Posted on: 2009/2/9 0:32
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Steve, can these circumstances lead to state supervision as has happened in Hoboken? Their pants are around their ankles, but at least there's no more obscuring of how bad a mess they're in.


Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
Twenty years ago, the average tax bill was around $2,000 to $3,500. This is the year before reval. After reval, multi-family builings under rent controlled received a lower assessment than one and two families due to the rent control laws. Reval will not change any abatements they are still in effect and legally cannot be changed.
Yvonne


Y'vonne, rent laws are only 1 factor in the difference between a "residential" property (4 and under), and a "commercial" property (above 5 or with stores), in the way they're appraised. Commercial is appraised primarily by rents, rather than comparable sales as in residentials. There are usually also financing differences, such as needing to put down 30%, limited to 15 year loans, and a loan is around 2% higher. All those factors lead to a lower return on investment, thus a lower appraisal, thus lower taxes.

I'm no apologist for rent control, but you can have a store with 4 apartments that still will appraise lower than than a single family under some circumstances. It doesn't make it a conspiracy. Fighting a reval because it might not be fair isn't comforting to those whose taxes are already unfair. The answer is to make sure the reval is conducted in a well supervised manner to insure it's revenue neutral, and then not wait another 20 years but to do them on a regular schedule.

Posted on: 2009/2/8 21:56
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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The Hudson Reporter had an article last month on the city's budget that is worth reading as it is directly related to your tax bill.

This tax bill was delivered without a budget and I voted no on sending this out for that reason. The concern is that the administration has not put forward a budget to the council and we are in the 8th month of the fiscal year. At this point, it is very challenging to cut from the budget or plan ahead because assuming we got the budget tomorrow 2/3 of it is spent as we are that far into the year.

My understanding is that we should have the budget in the near term and some of this is being pushed by the state in most cities. From the state's standpoint the more transparency there is to the difficulty in a municipality's budget the more likelihood that Corzine will get support for the pension deferral program he is pushing in Trenton.

Sincerely,
Steven Fulop

Posted on: 2009/2/8 19:34
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Twenty years ago, the average tax bill was around $2,000 to $3,500. This is the year before reval. After reval, multi-family builings under rent controlled received a lower assessment than one and two families due to the rent control laws. Reval will not change any abatements they are still in effect and legally cannot be changed.
Yvonne

Posted on: 2009/2/6 19:05
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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This was the first arrest:
It has also reopened questions regarding Mr. Healy and his participation in other bizarre incidents.

In 2004, as a councilman, he was photographed on his porch nude after a night of drinking. In 1999, he and his wife were arrested at their home in Bradley Beach and eventually pleaded to disorderly persons charges.


Quote:

npcityjc wrote:
Quote:

jcecker wrote:
After reviewing the posts I see that npcityjc remarks that Mayor Healy was arresteed twice,I was only aware of the one time he was arrested down the shore somewhere for fighting with cops.Are you saying he was arrested twice?Please don't take my post as minimizing only one arrest for a figure who represents our City but I was unaware of his second arrest.Does anyone have information on a second encounter with the cops?


Here you go

The Mayor of Jersey City Is Convicted Over a Scuffle
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By JONATHAN MILLER
Published: June 23, 2007
BRADLEY BEACH, N.J. June 21 ? A municipal court judge in this shore town found the mayor of Jersey City guilty of obstructing justice and resisting arrest in a clash with a police officer a little more than a year ago, leading the mayor?s wife, Maureen, to hiss, ?It?s a disgrace.?

The mayor, Jerramiah T. Healy, said in a news conference after the verdict that he had no intention of resigning his office, and would most likely appeal the decision, rendered by a municipal court judge, John G. Colannino, who ordered Mayor Healy to pay $828 in fees and fines and then imposed a stay of 20 days.

?Naturally, I?m very much disappointed,? said Mayor Healy, who was elected in 2004.

The case had become a cause c?l?bre in Jersey City and here in this modest town, where Mayor Healy vacations and where his sister owns a bar.

It has also reopened questions regarding Mr. Healy and his participation in other bizarre incidents.

In 2004, as a councilman, he was photographed on his porch nude after a night of drinking. In 1999, he and his wife were arrested at their home in Bradley Beach and eventually pleaded to disorderly persons charges.

Neighbors claimed to have seen Mayor Healy, wrapped in a towel, struggling with police on his front porch. The towel eventually came off.

When asked about these incidents, Mayor Healy, a former assistant county prosecutor and municipal court chief judge, said of the police here, ?I don?t think they?re out to get me, I think they?re overzealous.?

It was last June that Mayor Healy, now 56, was at Barry?s Tavern, his sister?s bar, celebrating his niece?s graduation from the police academy. Mayor Healy testified that he had drunk five to seven beers over five hours. He said he was not drunk when he left the bar around 2 a.m. and found a man hopping on the hood of a car with a woman inside. Mayor Healy told the man to get off the car.

When the police arrived, Mayor Healy said that he told an officer, Terry Browning, that a woman the officers were interrogating wasn?t ?doing anything wrong.? He added, ?There?s nothing wrong here.?

Officer Browning testified that he told Mayor Healy to move along, but he did not. Many witnesses said that Mayor Healy pointed toward the officer, who grabbed his hand; a struggle ensued, and ended with Mayor Healy in handcuffs and pepper spray in his eyes.

A witness testified that Mayor Healy exclaimed, ?I?m the mayor of Jersey City.? But when Mayor Healy took the stand, he denied saying that.

In the course of the struggle, Mayor Healy?s wife fell to the ground. Whether she was knocked by officers or tripped was a matter of contention among witnesses.

At one point, officers testified, Mayor Healy squared off in a boxing stance.

Judge Colannino, after a two-day trial that featured 14 witnesses, sided with the prosecutor on many details. ?He was told to move on,? Judge Colannino said in reading the verdict Friday afternoon, concluding that Mayor Healy resisted arrest, a misdemeanor. ?He did not do that.?

Mayor Healy, in interviews over the past year as well as in court this week, portrayed himself as a Good Samaritan, a man who saw trouble and tried to intervene before the police arrived. He and his lawyers tried to convince the judge that the officers directly involved in the case, Terry Browning and William Major ? who, respectively, had been on the force for six years and almost six months ? overreacted out of inexperience.

Mayor Healy and other witnesses further claimed that he was sprayed with pepper spray while both of his hands were cuffed behind his back and he was lying face-down on the pavement. But Judge Colannino said that he believed the spray was unleashed before Mayor Healy was handcuffed.

Jason Shamy, the municipal prosecutor, said: ?He seemed to feel very strongly that he was wronged. The judge felt differently.?

Posted on: 2009/2/6 16:56
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Quote:

jcecker wrote:
After reviewing the posts I see that npcityjc remarks that Mayor Healy was arresteed twice,I was only aware of the one time he was arrested down the shore somewhere for fighting with cops.Are you saying he was arrested twice?Please don't take my post as minimizing only one arrest for a figure who represents our City but I was unaware of his second arrest.Does anyone have information on a second encounter with the cops?








Here you go


The Mayor of Jersey City Is Convicted Over a Scuffle
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By JONATHAN MILLER
Published: June 23, 2007
BRADLEY BEACH, N.J. June 21 ? A municipal court judge in this shore town found the mayor of Jersey City guilty of obstructing justice and resisting arrest in a clash with a police officer a little more than a year ago, leading the mayor?s wife, Maureen, to hiss, ?It?s a disgrace.?

The mayor, Jerramiah T. Healy, said in a news conference after the verdict that he had no intention of resigning his office, and would most likely appeal the decision, rendered by a municipal court judge, John G. Colannino, who ordered Mayor Healy to pay $828 in fees and fines and then imposed a stay of 20 days.

?Naturally, I?m very much disappointed,? said Mayor Healy, who was elected in 2004.

The case had become a cause c?l?bre in Jersey City and here in this modest town, where Mayor Healy vacations and where his sister owns a bar.

It has also reopened questions regarding Mr. Healy and his participation in other bizarre incidents.

In 2004, as a councilman, he was photographed on his porch nude after a night of drinking. In 1999, he and his wife were arrested at their home in Bradley Beach and eventually pleaded to disorderly persons charges.

Neighbors claimed to have seen Mayor Healy, wrapped in a towel, struggling with police on his front porch. The towel eventually came off.

When asked about these incidents, Mayor Healy, a former assistant county prosecutor and municipal court chief judge, said of the police here, ?I don?t think they?re out to get me, I think they?re overzealous.?

It was last June that Mayor Healy, now 56, was at Barry?s Tavern, his sister?s bar, celebrating his niece?s graduation from the police academy. Mayor Healy testified that he had drunk five to seven beers over five hours. He said he was not drunk when he left the bar around 2 a.m. and found a man hopping on the hood of a car with a woman inside. Mayor Healy told the man to get off the car.

When the police arrived, Mayor Healy said that he told an officer, Terry Browning, that a woman the officers were interrogating wasn?t ?doing anything wrong.? He added, ?There?s nothing wrong here.?

Officer Browning testified that he told Mayor Healy to move along, but he did not. Many witnesses said that Mayor Healy pointed toward the officer, who grabbed his hand; a struggle ensued, and ended with Mayor Healy in handcuffs and pepper spray in his eyes.

A witness testified that Mayor Healy exclaimed, ?I?m the mayor of Jersey City.? But when Mayor Healy took the stand, he denied saying that.

In the course of the struggle, Mayor Healy?s wife fell to the ground. Whether she was knocked by officers or tripped was a matter of contention among witnesses.

At one point, officers testified, Mayor Healy squared off in a boxing stance.

Judge Colannino, after a two-day trial that featured 14 witnesses, sided with the prosecutor on many details. ?He was told to move on,? Judge Colannino said in reading the verdict Friday afternoon, concluding that Mayor Healy resisted arrest, a misdemeanor. ?He did not do that.?

Mayor Healy, in interviews over the past year as well as in court this week, portrayed himself as a Good Samaritan, a man who saw trouble and tried to intervene before the police arrived. He and his lawyers tried to convince the judge that the officers directly involved in the case, Terry Browning and William Major ? who, respectively, had been on the force for six years and almost six months ? overreacted out of inexperience.

Mayor Healy and other witnesses further claimed that he was sprayed with pepper spray while both of his hands were cuffed behind his back and he was lying face-down on the pavement. But Judge Colannino said that he believed the spray was unleashed before Mayor Healy was handcuffed.

Jason Shamy, the municipal prosecutor, said: ?He seemed to feel very strongly that he was wronged. The judge felt differently.?

Posted on: 2009/2/6 16:31
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Editorial from today's JJ 2.6.2009
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Don't expect load will lighten later
Why the mystery about tax bite?
Friday, February 06, 2009

The headline on an article in this newspaper on Monday advised: "Property tax bills not as bad as you think."

Really?

Jersey City property owners recently received quarterly tax bills that are about 28 percent higher than the fall bills.

City officials said they expect to see lower bills go out later this year that should provide an annual rate that's not significantly higher than 2008. The January tax bills are 3.5 percent higher than a year ago. The estimated municipal tax levy for 2009 is $151 million, the same levy as last year, they say.

The officials explained that the January and April quarterly bills are usually higher and then the July and October bills lower the tax rate once the City Council passes the annual budget in the spring.

The question here is that if city officials truly know that the tax increases are bigger at first and will be lowered later, then why not spread it out equally for all quarters? Why put such a burden on taxpayers who have to deal with bills, mortgages and other expenses? They want to know what fixed costs they have.

Comparing a tax bill to a previous year to justify a tax increase is a facetious explanation. Each budget is different. And by the way, the city is acting as if its budget is on a calendar year. Jersey City operates on a state fiscal year, July 1 to June 30.

Although yet to be approved, this budget is already in its eighth month. What is coming that they do not already know?

Most local governments do a draft budget, a temporary spending plan, and send out bills based on this estimate. What Jersey City officials are trying to determine is how much state aid the city will receive. State municipal aid has been reduced every year and considering the state's economic problems, there will probably be no increase.

Last year's budget benefited from a multimillion-dollar lawsuit settlement with Honeywell International. Jersey City received $15 million to plug a 2007-2008 fiscal gap. The city is expected to get $10 million this year from Honeywell, but it is not enough to make a significant impact.

Even if it were, using one-shot deals to balance the budget is a fiscally irresponsible way to run a city.

Yes, the tax bills are as bad as you think.

http://www.nj.com/opinion/jjournal/ed ... 33905128179220.xml&coll=3

Posted on: 2009/2/6 16:03
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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The city needs a revaluation. Tax payments on some properties will go up, because they have appreciated faster than the rest of the city, but the rate will go down dramatically because the overall value of the city has increased.

Posted on: 2009/2/6 3:19
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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After reviewing the posts I see that npcityjc remarks that Mayor Healy was arresteed twice,I was only aware of the one time he was arrested down the shore somewhere for fighting with cops.Are you saying he was arrested twice?Please don't take my post as minimizing only one arrest for a figure who represents our City but I was unaware of his second arrest.Does anyone have information on a second encounter with the cops?

Posted on: 2009/2/6 2:22
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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This is the reason that knowledgeable people in states with no income or sales taxes fight so hard against such taxes when politicians claim they will lower their property taxes by raising other taxes (e.g. NH successfully, CT unsuccessfully). Lowering taxes in general by imposing new ones has not worked. Once a new revenue stream exists for the government they push to incrementally increase it - for example the Federal Income Tax was originally intended to only apply to the "rich". I think we all know how that has worked out.

NNJR: Individual decisions ultimately have a huge impact. The high tax states have been losing people for years and once the talent base shifts (e.g. manufacturing from the rust belt to the South) it becomes irreversible. Productive people and businesses voting with their feet have a huge impact.

Quote:

NNJR wrote:

Once you add a tax, it will never go away.

I know I\'m only one person and threats are meaningless, however if JC adds a income tax I am out of here. JC will not see 1c of my income.

Posted on: 2009/2/6 2:12
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
I lived throught a reval 1988, my taxes went up from $3,000 to $16,000, we were using a calendar year, not a fiscal year so everyone had to pay 18 months over 12 months. Do you really want a reval? Scores of my neighbors lost their homes. Taxes are services, everyone should pay.
Yvonne


You talk out of both sides of your mouth. If you went form 3k to 16k that means you were not paying your fair share.

Quote:
Taxes are services, everyone should pay.


Exactly! New taxes is not the solution. Revaluation of all taxes is more important (not just property taxes).

Nobody wants to loose neighbors, but everyone has to pay their fair share.

Posted on: 2009/2/6 0:23
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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I lived throught a reval 1988, my taxes went up from $3,000 to $16,000, we were using a calendar year, not a fiscal year so everyone had to pay 18 months over 12 months. Do you really want a reval? Scores of my neighbors lost their homes. Taxes are services, everyone should pay.
Yvonne

Posted on: 2009/2/5 22:34
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Anyway, City Hall, you may rest assurred is doing everything it can to put off the real tax increase until after the election.....

Posted on: 2009/2/5 16:10
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Quote:

jcecker wrote:
"NOT AS BAD AS YOU THINK"
ARE YOU JOKING WITH THAT HEADLINE?
The title of the article should have read like this

Property tax bills not as bad as you think-They are actually
much worse than you think!

Excuse me for now,I have to go and fill out some applications for my third job.Thanks alot.



I AGREE. MY TAXES HAVE JUMPED OVER 30% SINCE MAYOR HEALY TOOK OFFICE. THAT'S VERY BAD FOR 3 1/2 YEARS. TAKE A GOOD LOOK AROUND TOWN AND SEE WHERE ALL YOUR TAX DOLLARS ARE GOING. MURDERS, STABBINGS, SHOOTINGS, CORRUPTION ON THE RISE. I'VE BEEN LIVING HERE FOR OVER 35 YEARS AND HAVE NEVER SEEN AS MANY CITY EMPLOYEES GO TO JAIL SINCE HEALY BECAME MAYOR - AND HE'S BEEN ARRESTED TWICE!!!!

Posted on: 2009/2/5 15:11
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
If you pay a state income tax, then you should pay a city income tax.
Yvonne


Your logic is completely flawed. Shakatah is right, before any taxes are added current taxes need revaluation.

Once you add a tax, it will never go away.

I know I'm only one person and threats are meaningless, however if JC adds a income tax I am out of here. JC will not see 1c of my income.

Posted on: 2009/2/5 0:38
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
Inequities already exists, Public housing had a deal written in which they could exclude utilities and water before they gave any money to the city, as water and utilities increase, public housing gave nothing. Rent-control is fixed by law. It is between 3 to 4 percent a year. Only, the 1-4 housing is paying the freight for the city. Property taxes are services that everyone uses. If you pay a state income tax, then you should pay a city income tax. Everyone wants new parks, charter schools, etc. We even voted several years ago to have a tax on the county level for open space. But only the 1-4 homeowner is paying more tax dollars for the open space. Where is the fairness?
Yvonne


Yvonne,

In my previous post I said that until the city deal with the inequities that already exist the city should not even be thinking about another tax. I agree that everyone should be contributing and that the burden should be shared fairly.

I know nothing about public housing and rent control laws so I can't comment on that.

However, an income tax may not be a silver bullet because most income tax structures have their own issues. For example..everyone living in the city has access to the same city services. If I make 200K and you make $1 million a year we both have access to the same services, regarless of income. Assuming a progressive tax structure or even a flat tax structure, why should you pay more to support city services than I do? Don't we have the same access to said services? A regressive tax structure would have lower income people paying a larger percentage of their income for city services than higher income people. Issues there also.

Bottom line: All three of these tax structures have their own issues. Using income as a guide for how much each person should be paying for city services also has its own inequity issues.

These are complex issues...but before the city even begins to think about adding another tax, it needs to rescind all abatements, then do a citywide reval of all property.

Dont know how, but the Burden should be shared fairly. Guess I'll know it when/If I ever see it.

Posted on: 2009/2/4 17:05
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Inequities already exists, Public housing had a deal written in which they could exclude utilities and water before they gave any money to the city, as water and utilities increase, public housing gave nothing. Rent-control is fixed by law. It is between 3 to 4 percent a year. Only, the 1-4 housing is paying the freight for the city. Property taxes are services that everyone uses. If you pay a state income tax, then you should pay a city income tax. Everyone wants new parks, charter schools, etc. We even voted several years ago to have a tax on the county level for open space. But only the 1-4 homeowner is paying more tax dollars for the open space. Where is the fairness?
Yvonne

Posted on: 2009/2/4 16:14
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
I went up $577.00 since the last quarter. These are estimated tax bills, in theory I could pay $2300 more than last year. Rent-control properties according to city law can only go up 4% this year. Forget property taxes, eveyone should pay an income tax.
Yvonne


Property taxes are already high, no argument there. The fact that for some monthly property tax is over $1,000 while neighbors with properties that were purchased in the same tax year for twice what you paid and are at least twice the size of your BUT pay less than you do in property taxes is crazy.

Can't compare Q3 (Aug) 2008 tax bills to Q1 (Feb) 2009 tax bill and use that to estimate how much your taxes will increase because if you look at the tax bills for all four quarters you will notice that Q1 (Feb) and Q2 (May) are usually higher than Q3 (Aug) and Q4 (Nov). Better to compare Q1 2008 to Q1 2009. Doing so, based on the estimates, it looks like a 3.4 percent increase over last year, for now cause no-one really knows what till happen to property taxes till the State passes the budget (deadline June 30) and the city knows what revenues it will get from the State.

However, if you have some inside info from city hall which indicates things will no longer operate how they usually do and that we should brace for a massive tax increase, please share.

Income taxes: Whether an income tax, property tax, headcount tax, or some combination of two or all three would be beneficial is extremely complex and I dont know enough to comment on whether creating a local income tax would be better than what we have now. But I do think that before the city even starts to think about adding another tax, it needs to rescind all abatements and include all land and homes in a city-wide revaluation. If the city is still not able to raise the revenue it needs after everyone is revalued and adjusting the tax rate to meet expenses then the city could start to discuss other sources of income.

The city MUST deal with the inequities that exist before even thinking or talking about adding yet another tax.

Posted on: 2009/2/4 15:30
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Re: Property tax bills not as bad as you think
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"NOT AS BAD AS YOU THINK"
ARE YOU JOKING WITH THAT HEADLINE?
The title of the article should have read like this

Property tax bills not as bad as you think-They are actually
much worse than you think!

Excuse me for now,I have to go and fill out some applications for my third job.Thanks alot.

Posted on: 2009/2/4 3:33
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I went up $577.00 since the last quarter. These are estimated tax bills, in theory I could pay $2300 more than last year. Rent-control properties according to city law can only go up 4% this year. Forget property taxes, eveyone should pay an income tax.
Yvonne

Posted on: 2009/2/4 0:22
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JJ really SUCKS, as I read an article which talked about a almost 30% tax (over last year) when the mayor announced he would be seeking re-election. Article did not explain anything. Don't remember who the reporter was, but after comparing my first quarter bill from last year to this one, I thought..this "reporter" should be fired. If anyone really paid attention to what JJ reports, it could have caused residents to beat down the doors of city hall.

JJ should report correctly or not at all.

Posted on: 2009/2/2 14:30
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Gee, and I thought all that big, old development going on would make the taxes smaller for us strapped homeowners & the like but I guess we also have to pay for the 300 new cops Healy hired. You've seen them, right?

Posted on: 2009/2/2 13:24
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http://blogs.wsj.com/developments/200 ... erty-taxes-in-the-nation/

That's an article from The Wall Street Journal discussing how NJ has the highest property taxes in the nation.

Yes, they ARE as bad as you think.

Posted on: 2009/2/2 10:12
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Property tax bills not as bad as you think

Monday, February 02, 2009
By AMY SARA CLARK
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Jersey City property owners may be reeling after receiving tax bills that are 28 percent higher than the October bills.

But city officials said residents should expect to see lower bills later this year, resulting in an overall rate that isn't significantly higher than 2008.

"Our expectation is that when the budget is finally adopted there will be no tax increase or a very marginal one," said Brian O'Reilly, the city's business administrator.

He said the estimated municipal tax levy for 2009 is $151 million, the same levy as last year.

The reason for the sudden jump is because the city makes the January and April bills higher and then drops the rate for the July and October bills once the City Council passes the annual budget in the spring, he said.

"(Residents) pay the lion's share of the taxes in the first and second quarters," he said.

The January tax bills are 3.5 percent higher than a year ago, he said.

O'Reilly said residents' fears should be relieved in a few days when they receive in the mail an estimate of their 2009 taxes and a reminder of what they paid in 2008.

Posted on: 2009/2/2 9:06
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