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Re: The Invisible Tear of Zurab
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Putin's Name Covered Up on 9/11 Memorial in New Jersey

The gift from the Russian people and its president is now just a gift from the country's people, with every trace of Putin's name covered up

A New Jersey city is making the change to a controversial memorial that was a gift from Russia.

The September 11th Teardrop Memorial was dedicated by Russian President Vladimir Putin in 2005, and had his name and signature on it — until now. The memorial against world terrorism in Bayonne had the Russian leader's name covered by gaffer's tape, which on Monday was replaced with a more permanent acrylic board.

The gift from the Russian people and Putin is now, in both English and Cyrillic, just a gift from the country's people, with every trace of Putin's name covered up.

"It's definitely satisfaction, but I don't want to take away from the monument," said Tom Cotter, the city's Department of Public Works director. "It’s unfortunate Putin’s name's on the monument, but I don’t want this to be a Putin thing. I still want this to be a 9/11 monument."

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/ ... al-in-new-jersey/3598954/


Posted on: 3/20 2:38
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Jersex City's rejection of Zurab Tsereteli's Tear of Grief mentioned in Th Moscow Times today.
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http://context.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2007/09/28/108.html

A new award, the Kandinsky Prize, will boost Russian artists with a fund of 55,000 euros.

By Marina Kamenev -- Moscow Times
Published: September 28, 2007

This year has seen Russia become a key player on the international art scene. Sotheby's auctioneers decided to open an office in Moscow and Matthew Barney and Yoko Ono both hosted personal exhibitions at the Second Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art.

But while Russia is importing international art, promoting its own artists is another story. Almost no contemporary artists are known worldwide, and the ones who are, such as sculptor Zurab Tsereteli -- whose "Tear of Grief" monument commemorating the attacks on the World Trade Center was controversially rejected by Jersey City -- are not principally known for their talent.

The Kandinsky Prize, Russia's answer to the Turner Prize in Britain, hopes to change that. Organized by magazine ArtKhronika with sponsorship from Deutsche Bank, the prize will be handed out in the following categories: young artist (aged up to 30), media art project of the year, artist of the year and a people's choice award voted for by members of the public.


"This is a natural progression. In the last two years, we have had the Biennale, art fairs and many exhibitions. With all these events, there comes growth in numbers of art critics, art investors, art foundations and institutes, and so we decided there should also be an art prize," Nikolai Molok, the editor of ArtKhronika, said at a news conference last week.

The prize will award 40,000 euros to the artist of the year, while the winning young artist will spend three months at the Villa Romana, a German-run cultural study center in Florence. The media art and people's choice winners will take home 10,000 and 5,000 euros respectively.

At the news conference, a list of 266 names, including such renowned artists as Oleg Kulik and Gor Chakhal, was handed out to journalists. This will be boiled down to a long list of 50, and the works of each artist will be shown to an international jury from Oct. 1 to 3 at Vinzavod gallery complex.

The six-person jury includes Jean-Hubert Martin, general director of the Kunst Palast museum in Dusseldorf; ArtKhronika editor Molok; Valerie Hillings, a curator at the Guggenheim Museum in New York; and Andrei Yerofeyev, the head of the Tretyakov Gallery's contemporary art department. They will vote on the works using a point system, with each juror's vote having equal weight.

"Many big names applied but they couldn't make it to Moscow," said Shalva Breus, the publisher of ArtKhronika. "For me, it was vital that they saw the physical work, not just [images]on the web site."

There is also an emphasis on transparency for the judges. "I want everyone to see that the winner will be chosen fairly," Breus said. "I am inviting the press to view the judging process at Vinzavod, and even though this will inconvenience the judges, I will let the press ask questions."

The people's favorite award will be chosen via the prize's web site, via messages sent using cell phones and by gallerygoers indicating their favorite works. "We haven't finalized this, but I think that viewers will put a sticker next to the work they like best; it's a method that has worked in the past," Molok said. The recently opened Art4.Ru gallery allowed visitors to vote for their favorite artworks in this way.

A final shortlist will be announced by November and works by the nominees will be exhibited to the public at Vinzavod. The award ceremony will be held in mid-November.

Posted on: 2007/9/28 5:46
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Re: The Invisible Tear of Zurab
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Sorry... it still screams vagina to me.

Posted on: 2006/9/12 18:54
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Re: The Invisible Tear of Zurab
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jc_insomniac wrote:
I wonder how much it cost Bayonne (and maybe NJ?) to erect this monstrosity.


Nothing.

All paid by Tsereteli and Russia.

That was part of the deal.

Posted on: 2006/9/12 15:34
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Re: The Invisible Tear of Zurab
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I wonder how much it cost Bayonne (and maybe NJ?) to erect this monstrosity.

Posted on: 2006/9/12 15:05
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Re: The Invisible Tear of Zurab
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I thought, "It can't be that bad", unfortunately it looks like a giant booger. Nice........

Posted on: 2006/9/12 14:51
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Re: The Invisible Tear of Zurab
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Darn, I was hoping to be able to check out the Military Ocean Terminal under pretext of visiting Tsereteli's monstrosity.

Posted on: 2006/9/12 13:40
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The Invisible Tear of Zurab
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http://www.kommersant.com/page.asp?idr=530&id=704090

The Invisible Tear of Zurab
The long torments of Zurab Tsereteli came to an end September 11, 2006. It happened on the Bayonne waterfront in New Jersey, where his gigantic Tear of Grief was inaugurated at last. The authorities of this small town that has just a bit more than 60,000 residents and that is located close to New York, finally agreed to install the monument. The tricky point is that their sanction extended not to Bayonne?s downtown but to the soil of the U.S. military base.
Zurab Tsereteli didn?t give in when first Manhattan and then Jersey City rejected the Tear of Grief that the sculptor was willing to present as a gift to commemorate the victims of September 11 attacks.

The gigantic sculpture was triumphantly set up on the coast of the gulf, which flows into the Atlantic Ocean. The monument faces exactly Manhattan and the famous Statue of Liberty, to be more precise, the famous torch of the Statue is sideways to it.

It won?t be easy to enjoy the sight of Tsereteli?s creation. You will see it from a special observation desk of Bayonne, but the desk offers the view of the lower Manhattan rather than the Tear.

There is a direct route to the gift of the sculptor, but this path is strenuous. For this purpose, it is necessary to endure the police cordon at the entry to the terminal for the cruise liners and then to the base of the U.S. Navy. And it will be only the beginning. The guards of the base admit only the visitors with the special permits.

You can look at the monument from a motor boat or a plane or a helicopter, the guards say, signaling the public at large will hardly see this masterpiece of Tsereteli.

Posted on: 2006/9/12 13:15
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