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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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Quote:

Xerxes wrote:
I take issue only with the statement:
"MOST homes in the Heights were built between 1860 and 1920."


As per 2000 census data for 07307
Housing Units in 07307 Zip Code (Year 2000 census)
Total Housing Unit: 16896
Structure Built Year
1999 to March 2000: 92
1995 to 1998: 169
1990 to 1994: 301
1980 to 1989: 815
1970 to 1979: 1380
1960 to 1969: 1850
1950 to 1959: 2124
1940 to 1949: 2497
1939 or earlier: 7668

Posted on: 2007/11/4 3:22
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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For instance, our whole block was in place by 1885.


And one home on Palisades Avenue was in during the Revolution.

But one house, or one block "does not a Heights make."

I take issue only with the statement:
"MOST homes in the Heights were built between 1860 and 1920."

Posted on: 2007/11/3 13:25
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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fasteddie wrote:
I am doing some renovations. Today I tore apart a kitchen cupboard, one of the last few original details left in this house. It has glass doors on top and a little counter and drawers on the bottom. I stripped the paint from the upper part and will rebuild the doors but the lower part was too far gone to save, 100 + years of paint layers, it was not salvagable. So, as I took the Sawzall to the lower faceframe, I find that it was mortised and tennoned together, not just nailed together. Someone put some real work and sweat into this thing. I felt bad, like I was commiting a sin, I was. You can google "mortise and tennon" if you don't know. The mortise was cut with a chisel and the tennon was cut with a saw, there were 8 of these joints on the small part I demolished and they still held strong. The drawer bottoms are 20" wide solid 1/4" thick clear pine, not plywood, this cannot be found anymore, I am saving this wood. Since I have been doing this work and taking things apart, I often think about the people who put it together. I always look for a note or someone's initials or a date penciled on the back of a peice of wood, I never find any, they didn't have time for time capsule notes. I imagine men in overalls with handlebar mustaches, pencil behind the ear, Irish or German. They went to work early, probably walked or on horse drawn trolley and carried their lunches with them. They lived in the tenements with their wives and children, they didn't own the houses they built, worked six days a week, wore themselves out, died young. All the materials for this house were delivered by horse and wagon and carried upstairs by hand or with block and tackle. Tons of plaster, thousands of feet of wood lath. The plaster had horse hair in it as a binder, the way we use fiberglass today in concrete.
So anyway, what I'm saying is, I hate tearing apart another man's well done work. Even if he lived 100 years ago, especially if he lived 100 years ago. I will replace it, I promise, but it will have European self closing hinges and ball bearing drawer slides.


This quote actually made me believe you are normal person.

Posted on: 2007/11/2 14:10
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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Thats nice... maybe you can put a time capsule in there when your done? put some pics of you working naked on the cabinets.



Quote:

fasteddie wrote:
I am doing some renovations. Today I tore apart a kitchen cupboard, one of the last few original details left in this house. It has glass doors on top and a little counter and drawers on the bottom. I stripped the paint from the upper part and will rebuild the doors but the lower part was too far gone to save, 100 + years of paint layers, it was not salvagable. So, as I took the Sawzall to the lower faceframe, I find that it was mortised and tennoned together, not just nailed together. Someone put some real work and sweat into this thing. I felt bad, like I was commiting a sin, I was. You can google "mortise and tennon" if you don't know. The mortise was cut with a chisel and the tennon was cut with a saw, there were 8 of these joints on the small part I demolished and they still held strong. The drawer bottoms are 20" wide solid 1/4" thick clear pine, not plywood, this cannot be found anymore, I am saving this wood. Since I have been doing this work and taking things apart, I often think about the people who put it together. I always look for a note or someone's initials or a date penciled on the back of a peice of wood, I never find any, they didn't have time for time capsule notes. I imagine men in overalls with handlebar mustaches, pencil behind the ear, Irish or German. They went to work early, probably walked or on horse drawn trolley and carried their lunches with them. They lived in the tenements with their wives and children, they didn't own the houses they built, worked six days a week, wore themselves out, died young. All the materials for this house were delivered by horse and wagon and carried upstairs by hand or with block and tackle. Tons of plaster, thousands of feet of wood lath. The plaster had horse hair in it as a binder, the way we use fiberglass today in concrete.
So anyway, what I'm saying is, I hate tearing apart another man's well done work. Even if he lived 100 years ago, especially if he lived 100 years ago. I will replace it, I promise, but it will have European self closing hinges and ball bearing drawer slides.

Posted on: 2007/11/2 3:14
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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I am doing some renovations. Today I tore apart a kitchen cupboard, one of the last few original details left in this house. It has glass doors on top and a little counter and drawers on the bottom. I stripped the paint from the upper part and will rebuild the doors but the lower part was too far gone to save, 100 + years of paint layers, it was not salvagable. So, as I took the Sawzall to the lower faceframe, I find that it was mortised and tennoned together, not just nailed together. Someone put some real work and sweat into this thing. I felt bad, like I was commiting a sin, I was. You can google "mortise and tennon" if you don't know. The mortise was cut with a chisel and the tennon was cut with a saw, there were 8 of these joints on the small part I demolished and they still held strong. The drawer bottoms are 20" wide solid 1/4" thick clear pine, not plywood, this cannot be found anymore, I am saving this wood. Since I have been doing this work and taking things apart, I often think about the people who put it together. I always look for a note or someone's initials or a date penciled on the back of a peice of wood, I never find any, they didn't have time for time capsule notes. I imagine men in overalls with handlebar mustaches, pencil behind the ear, Irish or German. They went to work early, probably walked or on horse drawn trolley and carried their lunches with them. They lived in the tenements with their wives and children, they didn't own the houses they built, worked six days a week, wore themselves out, died young. All the materials for this house were delivered by horse and wagon and carried upstairs by hand or with block and tackle. Tons of plaster, thousands of feet of wood lath. The plaster had horse hair in it as a binder, the way we use fiberglass today in concrete.
So anyway, what I'm saying is, I hate tearing apart another man's well done work. Even if he lived 100 years ago, especially if he lived 100 years ago. I will replace it, I promise, but it will have European self closing hinges and ball bearing drawer slides.

Posted on: 2007/11/2 3:04
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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Xerxes: not to pull punches, but you need to do your homework. Check out the plans at the JC Library rare room. For instance, our whole block was in place by 1885.

RE: Asbestos: talk to any abatement specialist. It is better to leave as is than disturb.

Posted on: 2007/10/30 21:32
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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Asbestos in siding is a danger indeed. But the totally INappropriate way to deal with such a danger is to keep it standing in perpetuity until it has all turrned to dust and blown away...often into someone's lungs.

If a home that is made of dangerous materials that should be a reason to evacuate those living there and REMOVE the home, not PRESERVE it.

Yes, terrible, horrible, rotten developers do terrible horrible rotten things...that's life, but it's never been a valid reason to stop development of a shantytown.

Quote:
most homes in the Heights date from 1860 - 1920

That is simply untrue...most were built MUCH later although many LOOK like they've been standing since the Revolution.

Posted on: 2007/10/30 18:28
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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My first concern is regarding the illegal tear-downs, given that I have two asthmatics in the home and am genuinely concerned for their ongoing health.
That said I do believe that the new buildings are eyesores now and will be laughable down the road. The quality of the new construction is shoddy -- these buildings will be falling apart in a short few decades, whereas the buildings that are being torn down have lasted a century or more and will continue on with a decent amount of care. What kind of neighborhood will the Heights be in 20 years when, instead of having beautifully restored (or at least maintained) and attractive homes, we have deteriorating shabby boxes with absolutely no yard space? What does any neighborhood gain by replacing stoops and front windows (where we've always been able to meet with neighbors, say hi, feel like you were maybe a little bit safer while walking at night) with locked tight garages?

Posted on: 2007/10/29 2:05
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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The historic preservation, if you note from the original letter, is just one of many problems that these new constructions pose.

To address the historic issue: most homes in the Heights date from 1860 - 1920, much like other parts of the city. While many are covered in aluminum, most are full of architectural detail, as I noted in photos of 76 and 78 Booraem before demolition.

To propose that the new builds are an improvement is incorrect. First, they do not remotely approximate the design standards the city put forth and poorly upholds, and consequently, they are total eyesores, made with cheap materials. Second, they do not follow basic zoning requirements, as suggested in other responses here. Most are illegal 3 apartments in 2-family zoned areas, and when two houses are squashed on a double lot, you get parking and environmental nightmares. Greenspace, not only a beauty issue, but also one to control toxic runoff into our sewers, is never integrated into planning.

Most important, for all of us whether we live in the Heights or not, is the issue of the environmental impact of tear downs. In the Heights, many homes are covered with asbestos shingle, and are often full of asbestos tiling and glues indoors. Builders do quick, illegal, and non-State compliant demolition without notification to neighbors, and in the case of the house photos attached here, backfill was actually quickly placed over the tear down site to cover the toxic waste produced during demo.

So in answer to the question here, no, indeed the new construction is not an improvement on any front. See photos. This is an example of a house that was torn down. Note the details inside and the probable asbestos shingles outside. There was no neighborhood notification, no proper asbestos testing, and they were built with illegal basement apartments. Just click, don't sign in.

http://www.kodakgallery.com/ShareLand ... p%3Fmode%3Dfromshare&Ux=0

Posted on: 2007/10/28 15:58
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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I agree with Xerxces, how can anyone state that new building development isn't an improvement to a neighborhood, or moreover to the city itself ?

With regards to the Heights, I grew up here and yes there were and still exist some Arhitectual beautys, but nowhere as near what you will find on the southern end of the city, i.e. Bergen Lafayette/greenville and therefore don't see where all the panic is coming from considering new builds in constrution is a "Win Win" for the Heights and it's residents.

I agree strict code enforcement, and protocol should be followed and abided by during the process, but then again
your elected officials need to get on teh ball with this.

RGDS
CK

Posted on: 2007/10/25 19:25
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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I totally agree. the new homes aren't nice but they are way better then the current shanty town. seems to me everyone is jelous of the driveways and garages.

Quote:

Xerxes wrote:
I have lived in the Heights and have always thought the architectural quality approached GHASTLY. There are exceptions but the basic Heights home was a thrown together wood and shingle one or two family home that weathered very poorly and was saved for a few more decades by a coating of aluminum siding. I have never lived anywhere else where the usual constuction form was so shoddy. I am often amazed that a huge fire hasn't somewhere along the way consumed most of the place.

I find it difficult to believe that development of any kind would not be an improvement to most neighborhoods with a very few exceptions along Summit Avenue and Sherman Place, and perhaps a smattering on Manhattan Avenue and Palisades Avenue.

I am not of the school that preaches anything that is standing is worth saving. But I'm sure there are people who can find some beauty in these multicolored aluminum sided shacks...not me, though.

Posted on: 2007/10/25 18:45
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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I have lived in the Heights and have always thought the architectural quality approached GHASTLY. There are exceptions but the basic Heights home was a thrown together wood and shingle one or two family home that weathered very poorly and was saved for a few more decades by a coating of aluminum siding. I have never lived anywhere else where the usual constuction form was so shoddy. I am often amazed that a huge fire hasn't somewhere along the way consumed most of the place.

I find it difficult to believe that development of any kind would not be an improvement to most neighborhoods with a very few exceptions along Summit Avenue and Sherman Place, and perhaps a smattering on Manhattan Avenue and Palisades Avenue.

I am not of the school that preaches anything that is standing is worth saving. But I'm sure there are people who can find some beauty in these multicolored aluminum sided shacks...not me, though.

Posted on: 2007/10/25 12:37
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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yes.... but there is already existing language to cover predominate characteristics of an area/block, set back, height etc.... and it is not that hard to change the zoning.....

the problem seems to be lack of or at best unequal enforcement of existing code and our allegedly public boards, Planning and Adjustement (Zoning) rubber stamping developer plans instead of looking out for the public interest and enforcing the city's masterplan.

a good place to start might be opening up the process for appointing members of the public to these important boards and an audit of code enforcement......



Quote:

G_Elkind wrote:
Quote:
by r_pinkowitz on 2007/10/23 21:02:09

Take a look at this and you may want to reach out to Charlene Burke (sp). There is power in numbers when it is combined with the other wards.


A +1 from me as well.

The core of the problem stems from the city's underlying zoning, which is often inconsistent with the character of many existing, individual neighborhoods. Where this inconsistency exists, it's most likely to first manifest itself in infill construction -- often with shocking results. (The 9th Street residents of Hamilton Park are dealing with a similar issue as well.)

IMHO the fight against this particular developer nightmare requires follow through to amend the underlying zoning to avoid future disasters.

Zoning can be a sleeping timebomb.

All the best.

Geoff

Posted on: 2007/10/24 13:34
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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by r_pinkowitz on 2007/10/23 21:02:09

Take a look at this and you may want to reach out to Charlene Burke (sp). There is power in numbers when it is combined with the other wards.


A +1 from me as well.

The core of the problem stems from the city's underlying zoning, which is often inconsistent with the character of many existing, individual neighborhoods. Where this inconsistency exists, it's most likely to first manifest itself in infill construction -- often with shocking results. (The 9th Street residents of Hamilton Park are dealing with a similar issue as well.)

IMHO the fight against this particular developer nightmare requires follow through to amend the underlying zoning to avoid future disasters.

Zoning can be a sleeping timebomb.

All the best.

Geoff

Posted on: 2007/10/24 6:44
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Re: Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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Take a look at this and you may want to reach out to Charlene Burke (sp). There is power in numbers when it is combined with the other wards.

http://www.channel125.com/tp12.htm

click on "in-fill housing horrors"

Posted on: 2007/10/24 1:02
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Heights - The Price of New Construction?
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Hi all,

Just sharing a current problem for our block association - one I'm sure is common for other groups as well. Enclosed is a letter which we sent to the Jersey Journal, Hudson Reporter, ward council members, as well as at-large councilpersons. If you feel the same way that we do with regard to the process and results stemming from these new constructions, please voice your displeasure using the numbers listed below. Thanks for reading.

A pervasive frustration is growing within many
residents in Jersey City Heights in the form of new
construction on our blocks. The new builds are at the
expense of old Victorian homes representative of the
time period in which our area was developed, and they
come with a price?be that of street parking spaces
(with already over-crowded street parking), illegal
living situations in basement apartments common in
two-family zoned new constructions, asbestos
contamination caused by non-compliant demolitions, and
non-compliance with zoning, building and design
standards (much of it negatively impacting the green
space and public utilities in Jersey City).

The house on a double lot at 43 Ravine was sold. Last
week, the neighbors noticed ?No Parking? signs
indicating an imminent tear down. The neighbors within
200 feet of the house have not been alerted to the
fact that it would be torn down (as per a buildings
requirement) and the house appears to have asbestos
siding.

The tear down has not occurred yet and neighbors have
alerted the NJDEP and Jersey City Buildings Department
regarding the potential asbestos hazard and the fact
that required notification was never received by
surrounding homeowners ? but will our calls to the
city be heeded? It wasn't when a similar property was
torn down at 76-78 Booraem just a year ago.

And what is the impact going to be of the two
multi-unit dwellings put in its place? The greed and
flagrant neglect by developers of Jersey City's basic
zoning and building ordinances is apparent in these
new builds. Residents are no longer willing to stand
by while laws that protect our health, safety and
standard of living are flagrantly violated.

We urge the people of Jersey City Heights and our
elected officials to speak out against the developers
who are building these multi-family homes. Please
utilize the following numbers.

To report an environmental incident impacting your
neighborhood: The Toll-Free 24-Hour Hotline
1-877-WARNDEP/1-877-927-6337.

To inquire about possible tear downs or similar
neighborhood concerns: The City of Jersey City Mayor?s
Task Force 1-201-547-5200.

Sincerely,

East Pershing Residents? Association

Posted on: 2007/10/24 0:47
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