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Re: Who needs body cameras? Police testing cellphone cameras
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I'm baffled that a lawyer would endorse the use of a consumer-grade device, outfitted with open-source software, for a demanding law enforcement application, but love *is* blind after all.


Posted on: 10/5 14:24
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Re: Who needs body cameras? Police testing cellphone cameras
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Another Jersey City First: Cell Phones for Police Body Cameras

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We have come to expect innovation and “firsts” from Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop and his city council. So perhaps it is not surprising that Jersey City is the first local government in the nation to use cellphone technology to implement a police camera program.

“I think Jersey City is a great place to try innovative solutions to challenges in government,” Fulop said. “It’s big enough that you can actually see what happens and try different things and it’s small enough that if it doesn’t work, you can change and adapt.”

http://observer.com/2017/10/another-j ... -for-police-body-cameras/


Posted on: 10/4 20:44
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Re: Who needs body cameras? Police testing cellphone cameras
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Cell phones instead of body cams for cops?

City to test options to lower the cost of monitoring
by Al Sullivan
Reporter staff writer
Sep 03, 2017

Jersey City will be the first city in the nation to test using cellular phones in place of expensive body cameras, city officials announced in August.

With the growing concern over violent interactions between police and civilians in crime situations, cities are seeking to increase personal monitoring devices for the police.

Traditional body cameras are expensive to operate, city officials say, and cops on the beat say the rules established by the state attorney general’s office are cumbersome and confusing.

City Spokesperson Jennifer Morrill said the program is being done in collaboration with Google Jigsaw, a division of Google, and Igarape, a Brazillian tech company. The test period should last between 12 to 18 months.

“We’re seeking to develop lower cost alternative to traditional body cameras,” Morrill said.

Posted on: 9/3 0:25
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Re: Who needs body cameras? Police testing cellphone cameras
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Who pays for the cops phones when dead batteries or damage occurs ?



Posted on: 6/26 17:25
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Re: Who needs body cameras? Police testing cellphone cameras
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A smart phone is not intended, suitable, or reliable enough for this sort of professional use, especially considering the importance and sensitivity of the data that needs to be collected.

Jersey City needed to be the first for this gimmick?

Posted on: 6/26 16:11
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Posted on: 6/26 14:48
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Who needs body cameras? Police testing cellphone cameras
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Who needs body cameras? Police testing cellphone cameras

Alan Gomez , USA TODAY Published 6:02 p.m. ET June 25, 2017

A solution for police officers searching for more accessible and inexpensive body cameras may have been in their pockets all along.

The Jersey City Police Department is the first in the nation to test a new smartphone app called CopCast that allows officers to turn everyday cellphones into body cameras. After months of testing the system with 10 officers, the department is expected to sign an agreement this week to expand the technology to as many as 250 officers.

As the U.S. is continuing to grapple with officer-involved shootings, the new technology may allow more departments to afford body cameras that provide a fuller picture of violent encounters.

"All police leadership need to understand that this is the future," Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop told USA TODAY.

The new system works like this: Officers download the CopCast app on a smartphone, and supervisors download a desktop version. Officers can strap the phone onto their chest and hit a button to start recording audio and video, which can be streamed live by supervisors monitoring from headquarters and show the exact location of the officer using GPS technology. The officer hits another button which ends the stream, and the entire encounter is automatically saved on a server.

Many body cameras on the market now require officers to download all their video at the end of their shift, meaning the video must then be reviewed and organized before supervisors can look over any footage.

Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, a Washington, D.C.-based law enforcement research organization, said the technology is intriguing because the biggest barrier for U.S. police departments interested in body cameras is the cost.

Body camera companies usually sell their services as part of an all-inclusive package. Wexler used the example of cellphone carriers, which give customers massive discounts when buying a phone in order to lock them into long-term data contracts.

Similarly, body camera companies provide discounted, or free, body cameras but require police departments to use their services to store the reams of video collected by officers.

Gideon Morris, the head of community safety for the state of Western Cape in South Africa, said he experienced severe sticker shock when he first solicited bids to equip his officers with body cameras.

"They'll give you a unit price and you'll do the calculation and you'll say, 'Guys, not in this era,'" said Morris, who went on to use CopCast.

Brian Platt, the chief innovation officer of Jersey City, said the smartphone app — which has a basic version that is free to any police department — allows his city to shop around for more inexpensive storage and support services.

Wexler said flexibility is much needed in an industry that is dominated by a handful of companies, led by Taser International, which changed its name to Axon in April. Wexler said more than half of the nation's medium- to large-size cities are using or testing body cameras. But he said 90% of the nation's 18,000 police departments have 50 officers or fewer, and they are struggling to afford body cameras.

"If the industry needs anything it's competition and innovation," Wexler said. "We'll be looking to see how this gets rolled out."

CopCast was created by the Igarapé Institute, a Brazilian think tank that focuses on security and justice issues, and Jigsaw, a technology incubator created by Eric Schmidt, the former CEO of Google who is now the executive chairman of its parent company, Alphabet.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/wo ... lphone-cameras/426859001/

Posted on: 6/26 14:26
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