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Re: JC Landmarks announces its Tenth Annual Preservation Award winners
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Congratulations to the worthy winners this year AND to the dedicated organizers of this event - namely, JC Landmarks - 10 years now of grassroots preservation advocacy and architectural awareness - and tonight's ceremony in Journal Square will capture that drive and spirit!

Posted on: 2010/5/27 21:25
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Re: TRANSFORMATION OF VACANT FIRST STREET PARK TO BEGIN
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Getting back to the First Street Park restoration project...

Here are a few iPhone images from this past summer showing the first of two site visits to the park. Four landscape architecture firms from the New York region attended, took notes, measurements, photos.

The VNA First Street Park Restoration Committee and the developer of the adjacent abandoned tenement, Gotham West, toured the park with the firms and provided them with information that would help guide their designs.

And now, weeks later, they will be sharing their visions for a transformed park at Tuesday's meeting in order to accept feedback from the Village community.


















www.jcvillage.org

Posted on: 2009/10/12 12:08
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Re: TRANSFORMATION OF VACANT FIRST STREET PARK TO BEGIN
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It's really sad to see this post become a rant against local bars rather than staying on topic: the restoration of First Street Park. A lot of assumptions are being made, like the park is going to remain open all hours of the night, but unless you (that is, jclisters residing in the Village) attend the neighborhood monthly meetings and actually get involved, you'll never know all the facts. By the way: those noises and odors assumed to be coming from the rear of the park were actually coming from one of the 2nd Street residential balconies - there's a known group of partiers out there quite often. And by the way: the park has been unlocked because the city's parks division is going in there to cut down the trees in anticipation of construction. So to sum up: know your facts, get involved, and start an entirely different post for anti-bar complaints. See you all at the Tuesday meeting, right?

Posted on: 2009/10/12 11:11
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Re: TRANSFORMATION OF VACANT FIRST STREET PARK TO BEGIN
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thanks jaah37 for seeing the positive in this restorative project! - yes, the four design proposals will be available for online viewing after the oct. 13 meeting - we might even post them here - otherwise visit www.jcvillage.org, the website of the village neighborhood association (vna) - getting back to your question about the adjacent abandoned house: that will be demolished in the next few weeks and a new home is going up in conjunction with the new park - thanks again

Posted on: 2009/10/11 13:07
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Re: Chris Daggett Independent for Governor Meet & Greet
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Star-Ledger Endorses Independent Chris Daggett for N.J. Governor

By Star-Ledger Editorial Board/The Star-Led...

October 10, 2009, 5:00PM

Ed Murray/ The Star-Ledger

The Star-Ledger today endorses independent candidate Chris Daggett and recommends his election as the next governor of New Jersey.

The newspaper’s decision is less a rejection of Gov. Jon Corzine and Republican Chris Christie than a repudiation of the parties they represent, both of which have forfeited any claim to the trust and confidence of the people of New Jersey. They share responsibility for the state’s current plight.

Only by breaking the hold of the Democratic and Republican mandarins on the governor’s office and putting a rein on their power will the state have any hope for the kind of change needed to halt its downward economic, political and ethical spiral.

New Jersey needs radical change in Trenton. Neither of the major parties is likely to provide it. Daggett’s election would send shock waves through New Jersey’s ossified political system and, we believe, provide a start in a new direction.
It would signal the entrenched leadership of both parties — and the interest groups they regularly represent — that an ill-served and angry electorate demands something better.
The lamentable fact is that the two parties are, themselves, little more than narrow special interests. Their competition for short-term political and/or monetary gain has jeopardized the state’s long-term economic health and left it with a tarnished national reputation.

Where the major parties have differed, their differences have been inconsequential. Where they’ve been the same, their similarities have been destructive.

They have contributed equally to gross overspending in Trenton by consistently pandering to the pay, pension and retirement policies demanded by powerful public employee unions. Democrats have financed the spree with tax hikes, Republicans with borrowed money, and both with pension-fund raids.

How do we now signal them that this has got to stop if not by rejecting their anointed candidates? How if not by electing Chris Daggett?

The most disappointing of the three candidates is Christie. Six months ago he seemed an almost certain winner, a highly successful federal prosecutor facing an embattled governor saddled with a collapsing economy and soaring budget deficits. He could run a rocking-chair campaign, it seemed, make only safe commitments, avoid controversy, and win.

Unfortunately, that’s mostly what Christie has done — a strategy that looks less promising now that his double-digit early lead has melted away.

Christie’s game plan for dealing with a looming, record budget deficit of $8 billion has been a work in progress. After pledging for months to cut taxes deeply despite the budget red ink, he disclosed Friday in an interview with The Star-Ledger’s Tom Moran that he has put most of the tax reduction on the shelf until the economy begins to recover.

But he’d still lower income taxes on the state’s wealthiest households by roughly $1 billion and restore a portion of the nearly $600 billion in property tax rebates rescinded last year — a neat trick while still balancing the budget.

Christie’s principal claim on voter support is based on his record as U.S. Attorney for New Jersey — and it’s not without merit. The Star-Ledger opposed his appointment to that post originally, only to be pleasantly surprised as Christie surrounded himself with capable, qualified people and performed well.

But his sketchy budget plans and his relative lack of familiarity with the details of state government, as evidenced in debates and before The Star-Ledger editorial board, give us pause.
Corzine is an eminently decent and likable man, and not without achievement. We especially salute his unflagging commitment to state education and his success in changing the Abbott school aid formula to ensure that money intended to help poor children follows them whether or not they live in specific districts.

But his shortcomings as a leader are serious. They’ve become all too apparent in his dealings with public employee unions, an often unruly Legislature and a Democratic Party that is, at best, an ethically compromised ship and, at worst, harbors a corrupt crew.

The governor may be the nominal leader of his party but there’s mounting evidence its commanding figure is George Norcross, an unelected South Jersey political deal-maker who’s currently rearranging the Democratic leadership in the Senate and Assembly.

Corzine is the chaplain on a pirate ship, not really its captain.
Like Christie, neither Corzine nor Daggett has adequately explained how he’d tackle the vast budget deficit. All three, to some degree, are like Dickens’ hapless Wilkins Micawber, hoping "something will turn up." But only Daggett has produced anything close to a coherent plan to cut property taxes. He’d chop them by up to $2,500 per homeowner — but only if their municipalities kept spending increases in line with the Consumer Price Index. In effect, he’d require local officials to choose between their union supporters and taxpaying voters. It’s not a panacea, but at least a start.

As for government experience, Daggett, who has a doctorate in education, has at least as much as his rivals, having worked for both Democratic and Republican governors and served as regional administrator of the federal Environmental Protection Agency. His mastery of detail is impressive.

The reservation one hears about Daggett among the surprising number who say they’d like to vote for him is that he can’t win. And, indeed, the ballot position assigned Daggett and other independents makes his task daunting. You’ll have to hunt to find him.

But the value of a vote is not limited to picking a winner. The real value lies in the signal it sends about what the voter believes is best for the city, county or state — not merely at the moment, but long-term.
We believe Daggett is best.

For disappointed Democrats and Republicans, a decision to vote for Daggett will mean a break with party loyalty — no easy thing. What we’re suggesting is a temporary suspension of that loyalty as a way to begin changing the corrosive culture of Trenton. Daggett would owe nothing to either party establishment; he’d be free to recruit best talent wherever he found it. As he told The Star-Ledger editorial board, he’d feel no obligation to honor the traditional Democratic-Republican deal that requires bipartisan balance on the Supreme Court. He’d apparently take the best he could find regardless of party affiliation — or lack thereof.

For too long, the cliche about New Jersey’s two great parties has seemed all too true — that Democrats are corrupt, Republicans incompetent. Nothing will cause them to change their ways for the better except repudiation at the polls Nov. 3.

The election of Chris Daggett would deliver that repudiation and put a highly qualified occupant in the corner office at the Statehouse.

http://blog.nj.com/njv_editorial_page ... r_endorses_independe.html

Posted on: 2009/10/11 12:59
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Re: TRANSFORMATION OF VACANT FIRST STREET PARK TO BEGIN
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One of our goals is that the restoration of the park (closed 25 years now) will greatly improve the neighborhood and become a singular oasis we can all be proud of - this post is meant to be a reflection of that positivity - thanks

Posted on: 2009/10/11 3:33
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TRANSFORMATION OF VACANT FIRST STREET PARK TO BEGIN
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4-FIRST: A LANDSCAPE DESIGN COMPETITION FOR FIRST STREET PARK, THE ITALIAN VILLAGE, DOWNTOWN JERSEY CITY

The Village Neighborhood Association (VNA), in collaboration with Gotham West Development, the City of Jersey City, the Jersey City Parks Coalition and JC Landmarks, invites you to attend 4-FIRST, a public presentation showcasing the visionary works of four landscape architecture firms aimed at transforming the long-abandoned and deteriorated First Street Park in the Italian Village section of Downtown Jersey City.

Invited design firms from across the New York metro area - including SiteWorks, Green Room Landscape Design, Garber Robertson Office (GRO), and Future Green Studio - will present their design concepts for neighborhood consideration and feedback.

The presentation will be introduced by VNA's First Street Park Restoration Committee, and a brief history of the site - from its civic advocacy origins in the 1940s to its Mayor Paul Jordan-led “Legacy of Parks” construction in the 1970s - will be given by John Gomez of JC Landmarks.


Tuesday, October 13, 2009
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: PS #5 (See map below or go to www.jcvillage.org)

AGENDA

7:30 – 7:40
Introductions
Rob Crow
President, The Village Neighborhood Association

7:40 – 7:45
The History of the First Street Park
John Gomez
Founder, JC Landmarks; M.S. Historic Preservation,
Columbia University

7:45 – 7:50
The Current Status of the Park
Rob Crow, Michele La Monica-Egar
The First Street Park Restoration Committee

7:50 – 8:00
SiteWorks LLC
Annette Wilkus, RLA, LEED AP
Martin Leibrock
www.siteworkscm.com

8:00 – 8:10
Green Room Landscape Design LLC
Adam Hoppe, BSLA
Keith Buzzelli
www.designgreenroom.com

8:10 – 8:20
Garber Robertson Office
Richard Garber
Nicole Robertson, RA, AIA
www.groarc.com

8:20 – 8:30
Future Green Studio
David Seiter
www.futuregreenstudio.com

8:30 – 8:50
Open Discussion | Design Review | Coffee | Raffle

The VNA will also raffle off a $25 gift certificate on behalf of the Lighthorse Tavern. The only requirement is to be in attendance!! Baked Goods donated by Cocoa Bakery & Bistro!
Coffee donated by Starbucks!

General Meeting Information: The Village Neighborhood Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Tuesday of the month in the Auditorium of the Dr. Michael Conti Public School (PS #5). Meetings begin at 7:30pm and are open to the public. Please use the school’s main entrance located on Merseles Street.

THE OFFICIAL 4-FIRST FLYER:



www.jcvillage.org

Posted on: 2009/10/11 3:24
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Re: Media
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A little more information is given in this update:

Jack Shaw of Jersey City, one of the 44 people arrested in Thursday's massive New Jersey corruption scandal, was found dead in his apartment this evening, Hudson County Prosecutor Edward DeFazio has confirmed.

A relative found the 61-year-old political consultant's body, De Fazio said.

Police were called at 5:17 p.m. and Shaw was officially declared dead at 6 p.m.

Homicide investigators as well as the regular police contingent responded, DeFazio said, noting that no weapon was found.

An autopsy will determine the cause of death, he said.

In the criminal complaint against Shaw, he is accused of taking $10,000 from the government informant for himself and an additional $10,000 in campaign contribution for an unnamed Jersey City official.

The longtime consultant had been a keen observer of the rough-and-tumble world of Hudson County politics for decades.

Posted on: 2009/7/28 23:15
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Re: Media
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Jack Shaw, figure in massive NJ corruption scandal, found dead in Jersey City

By Agustin C. Torres/The Jersey Journal
Tuesday July 28, 2009, 7:00 PM

Jack Shaw of Jersey City, one of the 44 people arrested in Thursday's massive New Jersey corruption scandal, was found dead in his apartment this evening, Hudson County Prosecutor Edward DeFazio has confirmed.

A relative found the political consultant's body, De Fazio said.

Police were called at 5:17 p.m. and Shaw was officially declared dead at 6 p.m.

Homicide investigators as well as the regular police contingent responded, DeFazio said, noting that no weapon was found.

An autopsy will determine the cause of death, he said.

Posted on: 2009/7/28 23:06
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Re: Media
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Posted on: 2009/7/28 23:02
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Re: Media
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MAJOR PLAYER IN CORRUPTION SCANDAL IS DEAD!!!

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/20 ... ure_in_massive_corru.html

Posted on: 2009/7/28 23:00
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Re: Several local politicians arrested on corruption charges
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TODAY'S ONLINE EDITION OF THE HUDSON REPORTER:

http://www.hudsonreporter.com/pages/f ... te_lead_story_left_column

Posted on: 2009/7/24 15:10
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Re: Several local politicians arrested on corruption charges
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Posted on: 2009/7/24 12:03
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PRESERVATION OF POWERHOUSE TO BEGIN
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Above photos: A newly minted Powerhouse Stabilization billboard by the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency is positioned in front of the seminal industrial monument. Local media included News 12 New Jersey, which covered the breaking Powerhouse battle in 1999, The Jersey City Independent, Jersey City Reporter, and The Jersey Journal, among others. Photo courtesy of JC Landmarks.



Above photo: The crowd included representatives from the City of Jersey City, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, and the preservation community. Ten years ago JC Landmarks went up against both entities - and now all are partners in preservation. Photo courtesy of JC Landmarks.



Above photo: Attendees, left to right, included Robert Antonicello, Executive Director, the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency; John Gomez, founder and president of JC Landmarks; the Honorable Jerremiah T. Healy, Mayor of Jersey City; Susan Bass Levin, Deputy Executive Director of the Port Authority; and Eugene Nelson, Chief Executive Officer of the Jersey City Economic Development Corporation. Photo courtesy of JC Landmarks.



Above photo: Video camera stationed in front of podium and billboard. Photo courtesy of JC Landmarks.



Above photo: John Bathke of News 12 New Jersey interviews JC Landmarks founder and president John Gomez. In 1999, Mr. Bathke interviewed Gomez near this same spot when the Powerhouse was under threat. Today the preservation predicament was quite different. Photo courtesy of JC Landmarks.



Above photo: JC Landmarks founder John Gomez holds a framed City Power poster presented to his non-profit preservation advocacy organization. Gomez wrote the National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Powerhouse ten years ago and launched a high profile preservation campaign. Today's event was the first real step toward restoration and adaptive re-use. Photo courtesy of JC Landmarks.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

"Powerhouse Stabilization Gets Underway"

The Jersey City Independent

Thursday, June 11, 2009

By Jon Whiten

As various factions have battled over who should pay to relocate the electrical transformers inside Jersey City’s Powerhouse, the health of the historic structure has become ever more precarious. With this in mind, the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency (JCRA) and the Port Authority today are kicking off a stabilization project for the 100-plus-year-old structure. This JCRA says the project is designed to halt further decline of the building while the Port Authority relocates the transformers.

Architectural firm Beyer, Blinder and Belle was tapped to helm the stabilization effort, which is set to include the replacement of windows and roof and the installation of new drainage systems to mitigate any further deterioration of the structure. The process is anticipated to take three to five months, and comes with a $3.4 million price tag, which will be picked up by the city, the JCRA and the Port Authority.

Once the stabilization in complete in October 2009 and the transformers are removed, the city expects the redevelopment of the site to get underway. The $90 million redevelopment, which is expected to be complete by 2013, is slated to bring 180,000 square feet of gallery, restaurant and office space to the building.

“The building will again play a key role in the continued escalation of the city’s renaissance, both economically and culturally,” JCRA executive director stated Robert Antonicello says.

Officials hope the Powerhouse will anchor a revived arts district of the same name, which as recently as six years ago was a thriving center for the arts in Jersey City. Ever since the artists who called the bustling 111 1st St. home were forced out in 2004, the Powerhouse Arts District, despite the best efforts of some businesses and residents, has largely been an “arts district” in name only.

The iconic Powerhouse, which also faced demolition in the late 1990s, was saved by community groups led by the Jersey City Landmarks Conservancy, and the building was ultimately put on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001.

For more on the stabilization plan and the redevelopment, check out this new site from the JCRA. For more on the history of the Powerhouse, check out JCI publisher Shane Smith’s piece in NEW magazine.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

"Powerhouse To Begin Stabilization Project"

The Jersey Journal

Friday, June 12, 2009

By Amy Sara Clark

The Powerhouse building in Downtown Jersey City - the linchpin to a planned arts district - is about to receive a $3.4 million facelift.

With Jersey City and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey each picking up half the tab, preservationists and government officials kicked off a "stabilization" project to protect the 101-year-old, nine-story building yesterday.

"This truly is an important use of public dollars," said P.A. Deputy Executive Director Susan Bass-Levin. "It really will be the focal point of this community."

The building once housed turbines that generated electricity for the entire PATH network, but now operates just a few compressors to power the train system's track switches.

The P.A. is currently figuring out where to move the compressors, and it will take about two years to get the new site up and running before major renovation work can be done on the Powerhouse building.

But stabilization work will begin next month and is slated to be completed by October, said Jersey City Redevelopment Agency Executive Director Robert Antonicello.

The money will be used for such projects as a new roof, temporary drainage systems, the cleaning and repair of brickwork and drain pipes, and boarding up the windows.

Referring to the structure as an "architectural jewel" and "Jersey City's Grand Central Station," Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy said it is slated to become an entertainment and retail center with cafes, restaurants, galleries and perhaps a movie theater that will be the cornerstone of a new artists district.

The Baltimore-based Cordish Companies, of Inner-Harbor fame, will oversee a $90 million development of the site, which is expected to be completed by 2013, officials said.

©2009 Jersey Journal - © 2009 NJ.com All Rights Reserved.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE POWERHOUSE STABILIZATION PROJECT, GO TO:

http://www.jcpowerhouse.org/

Posted on: 2009/6/12 21:18

Edited by Webmaster on 2010/5/7 5:54:28
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2009 PRESERVATION AWARDS CEREMONY in Journal Square
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Posted on: 2009/5/26 21:33
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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Preservation Month 2009 continues this weekend in Jersey City with the Historic Jersey City-Harsimus Cemetery Clean-Up!

Saturday, May 28, 2009, 10:00AM to 4:00 PM - light rain or shine!

Join local students, preservationists & community leaders for this exciting clean-up of the 1831 cemetery located in Newark Avenue between 7th Street/Mary Bensen Park & Waldo Avenue (right below Dickinson High School).

Please bring gloves & weed wacking tools; wear long pants, sleeves & covered shoes; pizza & water will be provided.

Community service certificates will be available.

More info at jclandmarks.org.

As the National Trust says- THIS PLACE MATTERS

Posted on: 2009/5/22 20:50
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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MOTHERS' DAY EVENT - BEACONS OF BERGEN HILL: A WALKING TOUR WITH HISTORIAN DENNIS DORAN

Sunday, May 10, 2:00-4:00 p.m. Cost: $5; $3 for seniors and students with current ID. MOTHERS ADMITTED FREE! Meet at the front entrance to The Beacon, formerly the Jersey City Medical Center, 50 Baldwin Avenue. Rain or shine!

Guided by historian Dennis Doran. This newly established walking tour focuses on the history and architecture of one of Jersey City's first "suburbs": the area along the beginning of the Palisades just north of Grand Street. Here Dutch farms gave way in the mid-19th century to extraordinary set-back mansions. Continuous slate sidewalks, awesome brownstones, old street trolley junctions and a former City Hall (now condos) all help to illuminate what just might be Jersey City's most beautiful neighborhood.

Note: "Beacons of Bergen Hill" will highlight the Conservancy's efforts to save the threatened St. John's Episcopal Church. We hope you are able to come out and sign our postcard petition! For more information contact Dennis Doran at dgdoran91@comcast.net.

Posted on: 2009/5/10 13:30
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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Posted on: 2009/5/9 14:56
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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Posted on: 2009/5/8 3:31
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Re: RESEARCHING YOUR HOME'S HISTORY - Register Now!
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There are still spots available for Tuesday's RESEARCHING HOME HISTORIES with Cynthia Harris at the New Jersey Room, Main Branch of the JC Public Library on Jersey Avenue/Montgomery Street.

Shoot an email to Cynthia at charris@jclibrary.org or call (201) 547-6961 to let her know you're reserving!

This is a terrific opportunity for breaking down the history of your old home!

Posted on: 2009/5/5 2:17
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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Posted on: 2009/5/3 11:25
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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TODAY'S PRESERVATION MONTH EVENT - WASHINGTON VILLAGE: A WALKING TOUR WITH HISTORIAN PAT GUIDA

Cost: $5; $3 for students and seniors. Meet at Central Avenue and Hutton Street, Jersey City Heights. Washington Village was a section of the Jersey City Heights, largely populated by Germans during the late 19th and early 20th century. We will explore the residential area from Central Avenue to Ogden Avenue as well as sites that were used by the Germans for religious, educational and social purposes. We will also visit a site where two innovative techniques helped to solve the problem of traveling between Hoboken where many other Germans lived and the village perched on the steep Palisades. For more information email Pat at pdg293@comcast.net.


View Larger Map

Posted on: 2009/5/3 11:06
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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If you can't make today's Lafayette tour, or if you'd like to carry out a self-guided tour at any time, here is a full-color walking tour guide published by JC Landmarks:

http://www.jclandmarks.org/documents/lafayetteguide.pdf


Posted on: 2009/5/2 14:28
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Re: RESEARCHING YOUR HOME'S HISTORY - Register Now!
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JERSEY CITY IN VINTAGE POSTCARDS - FREE ILLUSTRATED LECTURE BY HISTORIAN CYNTHIA HARRIS

At the dawn of the 20th Century there was neither radio nor television. Movies had yet to be invented and the Internet was not even imagined. Aside from books and newspapers seeing foreign countries or even nearby cities could only be done by traveling to them.

Then, in the late 19th Century the picture postcard was developed. With it was a chance to see your friend's hometown, school, church, every site that was important. Postcards became so popular that whole stores were devoted to their sale.

See Jersey City through the eyes of the camera one hundred years ago. See Dickinson High School in its orignal splendor, cows grazing in Curries Woods, the original PS # 14 with the classic bell on top to signal time for school and more.

Cynthia Harris of the New Jersey Room of the Jersey City Free Public Library will present a slide presentation of postcards that were proudly mailed to show off the sender's hometown - Jersey City.

It will be held at the Greenville Branch of the Library on May 12, 2009 at 6:30 PM. The Library is located at 1841 Kennedy Boulevard. FREE. No reservation required. For more info contact Cynthia Harris at (201) 547-6961 or charris@jclibrary.org.


Posted on: 2009/5/2 1:34
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Re: RESEARCHING YOUR HOME'S HISTORY - Register Now!
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RESEARCHING YOUR HOME'S HISTORY

FREE. Meet in the New Jersey Room on the 3rd floor of the Jersey City Free Public Library, Jersey Avenue and Montgomery Street.

Administered by Cynthia Harris, Director of the New Jersey Room

Have you ever wanted to research the history of your home? When was it built? Who used to live there? Or have you ever wanted to learn more about other landmark properties in your
neighborhood?

This workshop will give you the tools to do so by teaching you the basics of research in the New Jersey Room of the Jersey City Free Public Library, a treasure trove of
Jersey City history.

This is a FREE event; however, registration is required as space is limited.

Co-sponsored by the Jersey City Free Public Library and the Jersey City Landmarks Conservancy in observance of PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY.

To register contact Cynthia Harris at (201) 547-6961. Seats fill up fast!


Posted on: 2009/5/2 1:27
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RESEARCHING YOUR HOME'S HISTORY - Register Now!
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Posted on: 2009/5/2 0:55
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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Posted on: 2009/5/2 0:53
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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TO FIND THE LAFAYETTE TOUR, WHICH KICKS OFF AT 12 NOON, HERE IS A MAP


View Larger Map

Posted on: 2009/5/1 21:18
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Re: PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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The tours are usually LIGHT RAIN OR SHINE - and it seems every year the Lafayette History Festival & Tour gets hit with rain - but the tourists come out anyway with their umbrellas, and many landmarks are wide open - Unless it's a monsoon, the tours are on! - We will be posting plenty more on JCLIST throughout the month of May, so keep your weekends open for discovering many inaccessible historic sites in JC! - And also check our revved-up website at www.jclandmarks.org for updates and sign our email list! - Thanks, John Gomez

Posted on: 2009/5/1 21:07
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PRESERVATION MONTH 2009 IN JERSEY CITY
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Posted on: 2009/5/1 2:53
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