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Re: Large Explosion in Chelsea - 135 W. 23rd - Dumpster Destroyed
#1
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I doubt they will watch this.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlVyaIS20PU

Quote:

skinny wrote:
Quote:

Don't bother Bill. Most on this board won't watch it, and if they do they'll say every religion is bad. That's their answer.

Pathetic.

Posted on: 9/21 13:00
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Re: Large Explosion in Chelsea - 135 W. 23rd - Dumpster Destroyed
#2
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I don't know if the video is real or not....especially since the poster is a right winger....who in his profile pic is all geared up for some hunting with this trusty assault rifle....but if it is true its scary.

The irony is that the only commenter on the video states:


gas, deport, idgaf every religious muslim has to leave the west forever?.

Nothing makes the world a better place than fighting hate with violence an more hate.



Quote:

Posted on: 9/21 12:17
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Re: Large Explosion in Chelsea - 135 W. 23rd - Dumpster Destroyed
#3
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http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,175987,00.html


There are 1.2 billion Muslims in the world, and Islam is the world's fastest-growing religion. If the evil carnage we witnessed on Sept. 11 were typical of the faith, and Islam truly inspired and justified such violence, its growth and the increasing presence of Muslims in both Europe and the U.S. would be a terrifying prospect. Fortunately, this is not the case.



The very word Islam, which means "surrender," is related to the Arabic salam, or peace. When the Prophet Muhammad brought the inspired scripture known as the Koran to the Arabs in the early 7th century A.D., a major part of his mission was devoted precisely to bringing an end to the kind of mass slaughter we witnessed in New York City and Washington. Pre-Islamic Arabia was caught up in a vicious cycle of warfare, in which tribe fought tribe in a pattern of vendetta and countervendetta. Muhammad himself survived several assassination attempts, and the early Muslim community narrowly escaped extermination by the powerful city of Mecca. The Prophet had to fight a deadly war in order to survive, but as soon as he felt his people were probably safe, he devoted his attention to building up a peaceful coalition of tribes and achieved victory by an ingenious and inspiring campaign of nonviolence. When he died in 632, he had almost single-handedly brought peace to war-torn Arabia.

Because the Koran was revealed in the context of an all-out war, several passages deal with the conduct of armed struggle. Warfare was a desperate business on the Arabian Peninsula. A chieftain was not expected to spare survivors after a battle, and some of the Koranic injunctions seem to share this spirit. Muslims are ordered by God to "slay [enemies] wherever you find them!" (4: 89). Extremists such as Osama bin Laden like to quote such verses but do so selectively. They do not include the exhortations to peace, which in almost every case follow these more ferocious passages: "Thus, if they let you be, and do not make war on you, and offer you peace, God does not allow you to harm them" (4: 90).

In the Koran, therefore, the only permissible war is one of self-defense. Muslims may not begin hostilities (2: 190). Warfare is always evil, but sometimes you have to fight in order to avoid the kind of persecution that Mecca inflicted on the Muslims (2: 191; 2: 217) or to preserve decent values (4: 75; 22: 40). The Koran quotes the Torah, the Jewish scriptures, which permits people to retaliate eye for eye, tooth for tooth, but like the Gospels, the Koran suggests that it is meritorious to forgo revenge in a spirit of charity (5: 45). Hostilities must be brought to an end as quickly as possible and must cease the minute the enemy sues for peace (2: 192-3).

Islam is not addicted to war, and jihad is not one of its "pillars," or essential practices. The primary meaning of the word jihad is not "holy war" but "struggle." It refers to the difficult effort that is needed to put God's will into practice at every level--personal and social as well as political. A very important and much quoted tradition has Muhammad telling his companions as they go home after a battle, "We are returning from the lesser jihad [the battle] to the greater jihad," the far more urgent and momentous task of extirpating wrongdoing from one's own society and one's own heart.

Islam did not impose itself by the sword. In a statement in which the Arabic is extremely emphatic, the Koran insists, "There must be no coercion in matters of faith!" (2: 256). Constantly Muslims are enjoined to respect Jews and Christians, the "People of the Book," who worship the same God (29: 46). In words quoted by Muhammad in one of his last public sermons, God tells all human beings, "O people! We have formed you into nations and tribes so that you may know one another" (49: 13)--not to conquer, convert, subjugate, revile or slaughter but to reach out toward others with intelligence and understanding.

So why the suicide bombing, the hijacking and the massacre of innocent civilians? Far from being endorsed by the Koran, this killing violates some of its most sacred precepts. But during the 20th century, the militant form of piety often known as fundamentalism erupted in every major religion as a rebellion against modernity. Every fundamentalist movement I have studied in Judaism, Christianity and Islam is convinced that liberal, secular society is determined to wipe out religion. Fighting, as they imagine, a battle for survival, fundamentalists often feel justified in ignoring the more compassionate principles of their faith. But in amplifying the more aggressive passages that exist in all our scriptures, they distort the tradition.

It would be as grave a mistake to see Osama bin Laden as an authentic representative of Islam as to consider James Kopp, the alleged killer of an abortion provider in Buffalo, N.Y., a typical Christian or Baruch Goldstein, who shot 29 worshipers in the Hebron mosque in 1994 and died in the attack, a true martyr of Israel. The vast majority of Muslims, who are horrified by the atrocity of Sept. 11, must reclaim their faith from those who have so violently hijacked it.

Karen Armstrong has written many books on religion, including Islam: A Short History, published last year by Modern Library

Quote:

skinny wrote:
Dolomiti

You are correct. Christians have committed crimes. Some have even done so in the name of Christ. Some were politically motivated.

But let me make one clear distinction, because I find you're not making a fair argument and missing important point.

Unlike Islam, Christianity does not have an abundant hate filled doctrine or creed that proposes death and destruction to non-believers. In fact, they have to turn the other cheek. That's not to say they are above deplorable acts, (looking at you, priests and abortion clinic bombers) but it is in direct contradiction with New Testament scripture.

Islamic doctrine commands persuasion, subjugation, and if you're not a "people of the Book", then death. This is not a detail or a footnote. This is unfortunately, THE driving factor of the spread of this religion/ideology. In addition, it is many a devout Muslim's solemn duty to ultimately spread and instill Sharia. And unlike the West's, separation of Church and State, such a concept does not exist in political Islam.

As far as US based Islamic terrorism, I do agree with you. We should not be overly concerned or afraid of it here in the States. Not yet, anyway. But I can't help but sense you're downplaying the dangers of home based Islamic terror because criticizing it does not align with your liberal convictions.

What we should wake up to is the slow, deliberate, methodology that Islam continues to project on the West. We measure time with a watch. Islam measures with a calendar.

Let me be clear again, I am not suggesting all Muslim's share this view, therefore I am not vilifying all Muslims. But no one can deny their doctrine. And though I wish I knew more Muslim's personally, I would love to know how they contend with the hate espoused by Islam and square that in our open and free society.

Lastly, if Liberals openly criticize and ridicule Christianity, why are they so afraid to do the same for Islam? (Bill Maher the only exception I know.) Why? Because in my experience, today's Liberals will defend minorities at any cost, regardless of minorities' actions, creed and mindset.

Posted on: 9/19 22:43
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Re: Large Explosion in Chelsea - 135 W. 23rd - Dumpster Destroyed
#4
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lol okay. Yeah.



Quote:

iGreg wrote:
Assnif:

may you have a 1000 sons and each one be named Mohammed.

#Bismillah !




Quote:

Asif wrote:
BITCH PLEASE! She doesn't have to do a thing you say!

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iGreg wrote:
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jerseymom wrote:
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JCMan8 wrote:
There was also just an explosion in a Virginia mall.

And an earlier explosion in a garbage in NJ.

Could be ISIS or another Muslim group.


STOP - THERE IS NO EVIDENCE IT IS A MUSLIM GROUP - JUST STOP IT ALREADY!



You need to make an open apology to the group.



Posted on: 9/19 12:11
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Re: FOUND DOG- WEST SIDE
#5
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I hope the owners gave you some sort of reward. Id have gotten you guys a ton of coffee. Thanks for being so kind.

Posted on: 9/19 12:08
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Re: Large Explosion in Chelsea - 135 W. 23rd - Dumpster Destroyed
#6
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Thank you for being logical and awesome!

Quote:

Dolomiti wrote:
Quote:

JCMan8 wrote:
Of course that was his name. Of course that was his religion.



When we hear about a mass shooting at a school, no one is surprised when it turns out to be a white Christian who is a natural-born citizen.

It wasn't that long ago that it was Irish Catholics bombing the UK, or white middle-class hippies bombing the US.

There are plenty of white conservative gun owners who have suggested resorting to violence if the government tries to seize their weapons (a policy that no one in the government has actually suggested btw).


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To deluded people like Jerseymom....

There is no "delusion" involved when someone says "wait for the evidence."


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People who are unwilling to integrate into our society and culture SHOULD NOT be allowed to immigrate.

1) In the 1920s, the Big Fear (specifically, the Red Scare) was over anarchists and Bolsheviks who were, wait for it... mostly immigrants of Italian descent. Today, for some strange reason, we regard Italians as thoroughly assimilated -- despite describing them in the same terms as we do Muslims today. What a surprise.

2) No, there is absolutely no requirement that immigrants absorb our culture -- nor is it clear what that means anyway. What they are required to do is the same thing as every other citizen and immigrant, namely obey the law.

And no, a tiny handful of the 3.3 million Muslims causing problems is not sufficient to bar entire communities.

3) It is unconstitutional and illegal to bar Muslims from the United States.


Quote:
Trump is right. Enlarging ghettos of Muslims does not advance American interests and in fact endangers us.

Trump has absolutely no idea what he's talking about. My cat is better qualified to deal with the problems of domestic terrorism than he is.

To wit: What exact policies does he offer, to stop a lone terrorist who plants several pressure cooker bombs? What would he do to prevent this? Is he going to denaturalize every single Muslim in the United States?

Posted on: 9/19 12:05
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Re: Large Explosion in Chelsea - 135 W. 23rd - Dumpster Destroyed
#7
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BITCH PLEASE! She doesn't have to do a thing you say!

Quote:

iGreg wrote:
Quote:

jerseymom wrote:
Quote:

JCMan8 wrote:
There was also just an explosion in a Virginia mall.

And an earlier explosion in a garbage in NJ.

Could be ISIS or another Muslim group.


STOP - THERE IS NO EVIDENCE IT IS A MUSLIM GROUP - JUST STOP IT ALREADY!



You need to make an open apology to the group.



Posted on: 9/19 12:03
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Re: Democratic Convention
#8
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It scares me to think DRUMPF might win. Hillary isn't really that better of a choice in my opinion. She is a war hawk on foreign policy and is influenced heavily by corporate and big business.

DRUMPF is a loser and a con....but if he is elected...then surely we deserve it.


Posted on: 9/19 11:47
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Re: Large Explosion in Chelsea - 135 W. 23rd - Dumpster Destroyed
#9
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Of course we as a nation can stop supporting dictators that oppress their people. We could stop attacking or overthrowing democratically elected leaders an nations. We could stop selling arms to those very oppressive regimes.

I betcha there would be alot of less of these guys if we tried.



Quote:

JCMan8 wrote:
Quote:

WhoElseCouldIBe wrote:
Ahmad Khan Rahami has been arrested:

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/20/nyr ... mad-khan-rahami.html?_r=0


Of course that was his name. Of course that was his religion.

When most people woke up today and saw he was the suspect, deep down they were not surprised.

To deluded people like Jerseymom, stop feeling guilty over your growing concern over the Muslim problem. I know that's why you lashed out as you did. People who are unwilling to integrate into our society and culture SHOULD NOT be allowed to immigrate. Trump is right. Enlarging ghettos of Muslims does not advance American interests and in fact endangers us.

Posted on: 9/19 11:41
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Re: Elizabeth Station Explosion
#10
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Those two dummies won't ever try to steal again. Glad everyone is safe.

Quote:

neverleft wrote:
Quote:

Wow this is from the link....

"The Elizabeth incident unfolded after two men found the backpack in a waste basket on North Broad Street and Julian Place around 8 p.m. Sunday, the mayor said.

The men took the backpack "because they thought it was of some value," walked for a bit, then saw wires and a pipe, dropped the package and notified Elizabeth police, he said.

Bollwage told reporters the explosives were originally found in the trash can about 300 feet from the door of Wally's Pub near the train station in the city of about 125,000, which is also Union County seat.

"If that pub was crowded and there was a lot of people there, it could have severely injured, killed and maimed many, many people," Bollwage told reporters."

Posted on: 9/19 11:07
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Re: Large Explosion in Chelsea - 135 W. 23rd - Dumpster Destroyed
#11
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Yvonne...you have some of the best made up stories ever! When is your book coming out ????

Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
Quote:

HelenaJC wrote:
Historically, the term 'terrorism' refers to a deadly act done in the name of political, racial, or religious ideology. Large-scale killings perpetuated for the sake of violence is not the same thing as terrorism, although both are reprehensible and both cause terror.

For this reason, it is customary for most officials to wait to label it until a motive is established.

It is fine to dispute the need for such distinctions, but you can't pretend that this distinction doesn't exist.

Personally, I don't see the harm in waiting to make pronouncements until more information is available. It's not as if every lead won't be examined, etc. To me, this just shows prudence and level-headedness on the part of authorities.




Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

Monroe wrote:
We don't have a clue who did it, but Comrade de Blasio has no clue if he's saying that there is no link to terrorism. It may not be Muslims, or some right or left wing nutjob, but it was meant to cause terror.


I thought the same thing... on the one hand he states in no uncertain terms that the device and explosion were on purpose, but then goes on to deny it has any links to terrorism. I don't think he understands the meaning of that word. Perhaps he meant to say that there is no known link to terrorist organizations, or Islamic terrorism, but a premeditated bomb explosion is terrorism, no ifs or buts about it.


So you choose to ignore what happened in St. Cloud, where ISIS is claiming this person is their soldier and there is a link between the bombs in NY and NJ. Personally, I wish it is a kid playing with bombs, but it will not be the case. It wasn't in Boston, Orlando, and all the other places. No one wants to think terrorism is in their backyard. I have to say, people like you are just as scary as the terrorists. We cannot have a rational policy to protect this country because you are afraid of offending someone.

Many years ago, my brother drove a cab in California when he was attending college. One of drivers was Muslim and he said this country is stupid, he continued to say we will over take this country because of your freedom. Apparently, that driver was not boasting but telling the agenda of some who believe in martyrdom.

Posted on: 9/19 11:05
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Re: Small Ignorant and Intolerant Minds Masquerading as Enlightened
#12
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Amen to Concilium Oecumenicum Vaticanum Secundum.

Quote:

Mao wrote:

Dear Friends;
A. We ‘re All Proselytizers.
Firstly, Rich- I have never subscribed to the idea that one should not proselytize. And in fact we all do it all the time. It basically means trying to bring people around to your point of view. It is, to my mind, the other side of the coin of seeking. We each try to figure out the mystery of this existence and if it means anything and if there is such a thing as good and evil, right or wrong.
The Cynics were a cult in ancient Greece but have followers everywhere at every time who sneer or yawn and say there is no truth. The objection to proselytizing is like the objection to talking about politics. Religion and politics are the most intense and meaning of all topics. True, one needs to give it a rest at time or even limit it. But not ban it.
The word itself, btw, is from ancient Greek (????- (pros-, toward) and the verb ??????? (érchomai, to come) in the form of ?????????? (prosélytos, a new comer).[3] Historically in the Koine Greek Septuagint and New Testament, the word proselyte denoted a gentile who was considering conversion to Judaism. Though the word proselytism originally referred to Early Christianity(and earlier Gentiles such as God-fearers), it now refers to the attempt of any religion or religious individuals to convert people to their beliefs, or any attempt to convert people to a different point of view, religious or not. Proselytism is illegal in some countries.
I don’t know but I have a theory about the anti-proselytizing point of view. It sort of took the Victoria rule to never address controversy or heated subjects. I think this is true when you have a guest. My Jewish, Protestant and Muslim friends are not subjected to sermons when they come to my house or if we are eating socially- unless they bring it up. But this does not apply to neutral ground, the public square, the office water cooler, etc. One just needs to respect others and not drive them nuts with your beliefs.
I think too there is a bizarre fallacy that exports concepts from the screwed up First Amendment jurisprudence on Church and State. In 1971, SCOTUS in Lemmon v. Kurtzman required that activities that the government support be secular, not religious. Leaving aside the myriad problems in this area, people someone think that one must reserve one’s religious faith to the private sphere. The opposite is true. The First Amendment protects Americans so that each of us can proselytize as well as pray. The US is the best at this. I suppose a place like North Korea is the worst.

B. Right to Be A Private Ninny
Dr. Riveria, you are correct. And I find Dan Falcone’ approach regrettable but it is absolutely his right. It makes no sense, however. I wonder what it takes to put something like this up? JCLIST has been around and has a purpose. Things like Next Door are pretty good. I have mostly avoided Facebook as it seems like a hole. Is there a more open forum now that I might find congenial. Btw, it took 48 hours for the press to admit the weekend bombings were Islamic terror. The press is private and they can censor too. Strange thought that things seem less open than they used even with all the new media. I spent Sunday with a friend who has been in China for 30 years. He asserts that the internet has made the government more tyrnaical than ever and that the average Chinese knowns nothing that the government does not want it to know and, on the other, the government knows everything about anyone who approaches dissidence. I asked my wife’s friend what she thought about the situation of Christians in China (I did not say persecution because I did not want to offend her). Although her English is pretty good (and even though she’s raising her kids Jewish), she said “what is a Christian.”

C. The Cross a Scandal, a Stumbling Block- and now, a Joke
Your joke ridicules the most sacred symbol in Christianity. To believers it is the sign of the incomprehensible love of the infinite and almighty God for each of us. To non believers, it represents a Jewish Rabbi cruelly executed 2000 years ago. Why the myrth in either case? You paint me and all Christians with the brush of neurotic self absorbed masochists. You should read Candida Moss, the Notre Dame tenured professor who makes her living denying the cult of martyrdom that is central in the Church’s understanding of itself. And, of course, you somehow reserve your wit from commenting on Islam.

D. Real and Objective Value of Catholicism
There has been other criticism that I am carried away or delusional when I assert the independent value of Catholic culture apart from the truth question. Rich, I think, thought my statement that Catholic music was without parallel to be ethno centric and wrong. It may be wrong but there is, nonetheless, a strong argument to be made for it. The entire system of modern tonality- intervals, the scales, the ideas of harmonic progression and the contemporary rejection of these all comes out of Catholic music. A music PhD from any top place spends half his time studying the Catholic Mass (pre 1970). Virtually ever great composer seeks to compose a Mass. Palestirina, Monteverdi, depress, Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, e Vaugh Williams, etc. I was dropping my sone off at his Ivy league college and remarked how pleasant the Catholic architecture was. He was bewildered. I explained that his dorm followed the design of a mediaeval Benedictine cloister. Modern philosophy and its rejection of realism can’t really be understood unless one understands the 13th century synthesis that Aquinas achieved. Europe may be dying but I hope European culture finds root in emerging countries perhaps, Africa above all and it can carry on what had been true, as expressed by Belloc, “Europe is the faith, and the faith is Europe.”
This value of Catholicism has always been recognized and even if one found its dogmas ridiculous or abhorrent, one still grudgingly gave credit where credit was due.

Yours,

Dan

Posted on: 9/19 11:01
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Re: Large Explosion in Chelsea - 135 W. 23rd - Dumpster Destroyed
#13
Home away from home
Home away from home


https://www.washingtonpost.com/nationa ... 6-b7bbd53d2b5d_story.html

In Jim Cooley’s open-carry America, even a trip to Walmart can require an AR-15

WINDER, Ga. —All Jim Cooley wants to do is buy some soda.

“You want to come to Walmart?” he asks his wife.

“No,” Maria says.

“Pretty please?” Jim asks.

“I’m not going to sit there and have the police called on you. I mean, I don’t want to see that crap,” Maria says, knowing what a trip to Walmart means. She knows her 51-year-old husband has two guns inside the house, and this afternoon it won’t be the 9mm, which he straps on with a round in the chamber when grabbing lunch at his favorite fast-food restaurant or visiting a friend’s auto shop. It’ll be the AR-15 semiautomatic rifle, which he brings when going somewhere he thinks is dangerous, like the Atlanta airport, where he’s taken it loaded with a 100-bullet drum, or Walmart, where he thinks crowds could pose easy targets for terrorists.

In a country of relaxing gun laws where it’s now legal to open-carry in 45 states and there are 14.5 million people with carry permits, every day seems to bring a new version of what open carry can mean. In Kentucky, it’s now legal to open-carry in city buildings. In downtown Cleveland, people carried military-style rifles during the Republican National Convention. In Howell, Mich., last month, a father went openly armed to his child’s middle-school orientation. In Mississippi, it’s now legal to open-carry without a permit at all. And in Georgia, which has passed a “guns everywhere” bill and has issued nearly 1 million carry permits, Jim Cooley is staking out his version of what’s acceptable as he keeps pleading with his wife.

“I got to get soda.”

Maria sighs. She worked the night before assembling air-conditioner compressors at a nearby factory, and in a few hours, she knows she’ll have to leave for another third shift.

“Yeah,” she says, giving in. “I might as well get this travesty out of the way.”

“What travesty?”

“You carrying a big ol’ rifle in the store, scaring the hell out of all the Walmart shoppers.”

“There’s no difference between carrying a rifle and carrying a handgun,” he says.

“You tried that last time, remember?” Maria says, stepping into a pair of flip-flops and running her fingers through her hair. “And what happened? Barrow County sheriffs. Three or four of them.”

“They can’t tell me what and what not to carry,” Jim says. “You know I wouldn’t listen to them anyway.”

“Well, you go one way in the store; I’ll go the other,” Maria says. “Then when they say, ‘Ma’am, do you know this person?’ I’ll say, ‘No, I’ve never seen him before in my life.’?”

He places a lit cigarette into an ashtray, walks into his bedroom, reaches behind its door, picks up the AR-15, snaps in a magazine with 15 rounds, and slings the rifle around his left shoulder so it rests against his torso.

“Ready?” he asks.

“Yeah,” she says, grabbing her purse and following her husband out the door for an afternoon trip to Walmart to buy soda.

***

The gun Jim Cooley carries is the ATI Omni-Hybrid Maxx AR-15 semiautomatic rifle. It cost him $579.99. It weighs 6.25 pounds, is 35 inches long, and fires bullets as fast as the trigger can be pulled, and, as Jim has learned, fits nicely between the front seats of a white minivan with peeling paint on the front and a bumper sticker on the back that says, “I ? Law.”

Jim goes everywhere now with a gun — if not the AR-15, then his sidearm — and is so reliant on one being close by that it surprises him to think the majority of his life was lived otherwise. He was raised in a working-class family in Chicago, where he can’t imagine living now because of its strict gun laws. But they didn’t bother him then. He didn’t hunt. He didn’t fear for his safety. If his dad had a gun, no one knew. He grew up without a gun, went to church without a gun, married Maria without a gun, began raising two children without a gun, and settled into a life that felt as safe as it was dependable.

But then it began unraveling, starting when he was fired from a trucking job days after telling Maria, who was pregnant with their first child, to quit her job and focus on the baby, that he could support them both. Their first bankruptcy filing wasn’t far behind, then the second, and the third, and then they were moving to Florida, where Maria had family and where Jim got a job with a grocery chain. It transferred him to Winder, and he moved the family into a middle-class neighborhood struggling with crime and drugs.

Jim now steers past the house of a neighbor who sold him his first gun — a .380 semiautomatic for $100 — so he could protect his family from that crime, then past Winder’s only gun shop where he took his dad so he could buy a gun, too. He lights a cigarette, feels the breeze from an open window because the air conditioner is broken, and takes a sip of soda from a big mug that says Athens Regional Medical Center.

It’s a memento of sorts from the day in late 2008 when he emerged from that hospital with three stents in his heart, debts worth $41,052.51 and a dawning realization he was now disabled, broke and would never work again. After the heart attack, he lost most of the circulation in his legs, received three more stents and started using an electric scooter whenever he had to walk long distances.

He told Maria he was all used up, a drag on the family. She should think about leaving him. But she wouldn’t, even after the hospital sued him for unpaid medical bills, even after he was arrested when he carried his .380 outside a school board meeting, even after he came home one day with an AR-15. He shot it at a nearby firing range and, feeling a sense of control that had gone missing in his life, told Maria he could now keep the family safe.

She now sits at his side, as always, in the passenger seat. At first, she didn’t understand the changes she saw in the man she married 24 years ago. Why did he suddenly want a gun when he never mentioned one before? Why did he want her to get one, too? Why did he put two four-inch knives inside the car’s ­passenger-side door? And why all the security cameras? Maria glances at a small screen beneath the rearview mirror: It shows feeds from surveillance cameras affixed inside the car that start recording when someone turns the ignition.


But Maria went along with all of it. She bought a .380 semi­automatic and has gotten used to taking it with her wherever she goes. She got used to the cameras, too, including the seven Jim placed around the house’s perimeter. She began to understand why he was so concerned about crime, about terrorists, about the need to protect their family because they couldn’t count on the government to do it for them. Last year, when he showed her his new AR-15 and asked her to shoot it, she did, feeling intimidated afterward. But then she did it again. And when he started bringing the rifle not just to the range, but to Atlanta, to the airport, inside Walmart, she eventually went along with that, too.

So much of her life involves accommodating him now, including just before they left for Walmart and he asked her to send a Facebook message to a local deputy about his plans. “What do you want me to tell him?” Maria had asked.

“Say, ‘Hey, buddy, I’m going to Walmart, and I’m going to have my AR with me, so if any call comes over the radio, you know it’s me,” Jim told her.

Maria sat at a laptop in a bedroom cluttered with stacks of documents, some of which detailed foreclosure proceedings against the house, and saw the browser had 35 tabs open. One was a YouTube video of something called “Police State 101.” Another showed the dictionary definition of the word “law.” Another was a fringe website her husband classifies as “underground,” the sort he started visiting more frequently after he joined a Georgia militia in late 2014 and decided it was up to him to protect his family from foreign and government threats.

She messaged the deputy, then looked at Jim’s Facebook page. It bore pictures of her husband carrying guns and posts about a country dissolving into chaos and videos about people stopping intruders with guns, people killing burglars with guns, people shooting big guns, small guns, all kinds of guns, that he watches late into the night.

She came back to the kitchen table, where Jim sat and smoked.

“At least I notified the sheriff’s department ahead of time,” he said. He looked at Maria. “Come on, come to Walmart with me,” he said. “I got to get soda.”

So she went along with that, too, and now here she is, pulling into a parking spot outside Walmart, and her husband is reaching for an AR-15 that he tells her sometimes he would have no problem using against a thief breaking into their house, or a violent protester in the streets of Milwaukee, or a terrorist in Syria, or, if necessary, even a stray dog on their lawn.

The Walmart Supercenter is outside of downtown Winder, next to the Subway, the Great Clips, the GameStop, and buffered by a parking lot that can easily fit hundreds of cars, but is rarely more than half-full on weekdays. There are two entrances. One is beside the landscaping section and says “Home and Garden” above the doorway. The other, which Jim now walks through, leads to another Subway, this one just inside the supercenter.

As Maria goes ahead, Jim veers to the right, where he climbs into a complimentary electric scooter, repositions his AR-15 so its barrel points toward the scuffed vinyl floor, and rolls into the store.

“Hey, Maria,” he calls when catching up to her. “Do we need any lunch meat?”

“I’ll go get some salami,” she says.

“All right,” he says, now alone, and accelerates the scooter deeper into the store, crossing into the grocery section. Two middle-aged women stand beside a refrigerator, talking. One of them looks at Jim, sees the gun around his neck and goes silent. The other woman turns, and when she sees the gun, her expression freezes, too. But it’s not the fearful looks that Jim notices as he rolls past. It’s a nearby sale. “Eighty-eight cents for a loaf,” he says and keeps moving toward the back of the store.

Not everyone sees his AR-15, which is partially obscured by the cart. One man walks past without a second look. So does a woman, making her way into the clothing section. One couple give Jim wide berth, their eyes on his scooter and, briefly, his gun. And then Jim gets where he’s going — the soda aisle — and sees what he’s looking for.

He reaches out and, grunting, pulls free a 24-pack of Diet Dr. Thunder. Trying not to jostle the AR-15, he leans forward and, twisting awkwardly, drops the box into the scooter’s front cart, accidentally tearing it open.

“They don’t make these things like they used to,” he says quietly and grabs another 24-pack of Diet Dr. Thunder, placing this one inside the cart more gently.

In search of Maria, he continues into the dairy section, where he wheels past a father and his young daughter who stares at his rifle, into aisle 9, where he puts a large can of Great Value Classic Roast Coffee into his cart, and finally back to the front of the supercenter, where he sees Maria ordering salami.

She takes the soda and coffee out of his cart and places it in her own. She gestures at a nearby cheesecake. “They got strawberry swirl,” she says.

He is leaning forward. The muzzle of the loaded gun is pressing against his shoe. Now it’s sliding under his shoelaces.

“Give me the strawberry swirl,” he says, and as Maria heads toward the checkout line with the cheesecake, the salami, the coffee and the soda, he straightens up and the muzzle slides free of his shoe.

He steers toward the front doors, parks the scooter, slowly stands and walks outside, and that’s when a group of employees standing just outside the entrance notices the gun.

“Is that what I see?” one will later recall saying.

“What do we do if he comes in the store?”

“If someone feels uncomfortable, what can we do?”

They continue staring as Jim walks into the parking lot toward the car.

“You know my grandfather was murdered, right?” one of the employees says, and as they launch into a discussion of a robbery and shooting that happened in 1973, they are in the midst of a late summer afternoon in 2016 with its own set of shootings.

In California, by the end of this day, a 61-year-old man will have been shot to death at a carwash.

In Virginia, an intruder will have burst into a home and killed a 24-year-old man inside.

In Missouri, a woman will have shot and killed a man she said was chasing her.

And meanwhile, in Georgia, Jim is braking hard on the ride home, causing his AR-15 to topple forward.

“Can you hold onto that for me, please?” he asks Maria.

“Yeah,” she says, putting the gun back where it was, and without further incident they continue on their way home, where Jim puts away his AR-15, sits down at the kitchen table and takes a drink of Diet Dr. Thunder.

Posted on: 9/18 5:36
Top


Re: Censorship and Dhimmitude
#14
Home away from home
Home away from home


I am not sure where you are getting this oppression of Christianity from but ...if that is ur view...it's your view.

Concerning your views on certain religions and or people..to me comes across as insidious.

I'll leave you with this:

If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy. James Madison

Quote:

Mao wrote:
Dear Mr. Falcone:

Are you being disengenuous? You removed a discussion about a Muslim who had been arrested for desecrating OLV in Greenville. That is a type of censorship. It is your right to do so, I think, since this is a privately run site and there are no First Amendment rights here. Therefore, I simply asked why did you remove it? Perhaps you have some rules you could share with your loyal customers? I pointed out, further, that you clearly have no rule against attacks on Christianity and upon Christians even when the attacks are personal and vulgar.

Yes, functionally, this thread re-introduced the topic you had censored. Now you say you are going to remove it again. Why?

YOurs,

Maoi

Posted on: 9/10 0:28
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Re: Censorship and Dhimmitude
#15
Home away from home
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All you hate filled people on this thread just come out and say this is what you really want:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGVBn_3EjmE

Posted on: 9/8 19:05
Top


Re: Censorship and Dhimmitude
#16
Home away from home
Home away from home


Donald is the snake an the woman is America.....good video!

Quote:
Regarding your last line, luckily for us we have a presidential candidate who clearly understands the dangers you discuss. I'm not sure if you've seen this video, but I think you will like it. http://youtu.be/hvuUQGto-_M

Posted on: 9/8 19:02
Top


Re: Censorship and Dhimmitude
#17
Home away from home
Home away from home


THANK YOU WEBMASTER! You rock! As said in Corinthians 10:31, your actions have brought glory to God.

Posted on: 9/7 19:39
Top


Re: Republican Convention
#18
Home away from home
Home away from home


http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slates ... ting_and_infuriating.html

The Story of Khalid Jabara’s Murder Is Devastating and Infuriating


It’s very hard to know where to begin with the murder of Khalid Jabara, whose story is one of the most devastating and infuriating accounts of systemic failures in the legal system you are likely to read about. That’s the takeaway from a harrowing telling of Jabara’s death published in the Washington Post on Tuesday.

Jabara’s family had allegedly been stalked for years by Vernon Majors, who had described them at one point to police as “filthy Lebanese.” According to a police report described by the Post, Majors confessed last year to nearly killing Jabara’s mother in a horrifying hit-and-run. After initially being denied bail for assault and battery with a deadly weapon among other crimes and spending eight months in jail, District Judge William LaFortune reversed that decision and allowed Majors to be released on bond in May. On Friday, Jabara called police to inform them that he had heard Majors had acquired a gun—as part of a restraining order Jabara's mother had taken out on Majors, which he had been charged with violating, the 61-year-old was not allowed to possess firearms. The police told Jabara that there was nothing they could do and left his home. Eight minutes later, according to the account Tulsa Police Homicide Sgt. Dave Walker gave the Post, neighbors reported hearing gunshots. Majors had allegedly shot and killed Jabara on his front porch while the 37-year-old was on his cellphone with his family and getting the mail. “When one neighbor screamed at Majors to leave, he pointed his gun at the neighbor before fleeing in his bare feet, leaving footprints in blood and then mud between the two houses,” according to the Post’s telling of the police account. Majors was found hiding behind a tree, arrested with a six pack of beer nearby, taken to the hospital for illness, and police say he will be charged with first-degree murder as soon as he can leave the hospital.

“The Constitution allows for people to bond out,” Walker told the Post of the failures that led to Jabara’s death. “That said, certainly, knowing what we know today, decisions would be made differently.”

Victoria Jabara Williams, Jabara’s sister, described on Facebook the period leading up to her brother’s murder:

This suspect had a history of bigotry against our family. He repeatedly attacked our ethnicity and perceived religion, making racist comments. He often called us “dirty Arabs,” “filthy Lebanese,” “Aye-rabs,” and “Mooslems”—a fact highlighted by the Tulsa Police Department who also heard these comments from the suspect. The suspect’s bigotry was not isolated to us alone. He made xenophobic comments about many in our community -- “filthy Mexican” and the “n” word were all part of his hateful approach to anyone from a different background.

….

This [case] is troubling at any time, but profoundly disturbing given the current climate of our country and the increase nationally in cases of hate crimes.

Our brother Khalid was just 37 years old and had his whole life ahead of him. He was a kind spirit, loving brother, uncle and son. Khalid’s heart was big. He cared for our entire family, our friends and people he didn’t even know. He created every Jabara family joke and filled our lives with love and laughter. All of that has been taken away from us by this hateful man and a system that failed to protect our community.

Another of Khalid’s siblings, Rami Jabara, posted this on Facebook about his brother:

While one cannot explain irrationality and evil, one thing I can explain is that indifference and inaction were major factors leading to Khalid’s death. As an attorney, I have seen the system fail defendants, but it also seems to fail the victims just as much or perhaps more. I feel like my family lost, my community lost. My brother lost. We all lost. I feel like we did everything we possibly could do advocate for and protect ourselves. In the past few days while grieving my brother, I can't help but think about those victims who might not have the knowledge of the legal system to advocate for themselves, or who don't know the doors to knock on. What about them? For those of you who didn't know my only brother, he was hilarious, quirky, very intelligent, and really would give all of himself for anyone he loved. I miss him. And I know that I'll miss him more with every day that passes. I love you Khalid

If all of that weren’t wrenching enough, the details of Majors’ history with the family make the case even more tragic.

On Aug. 6, 2013, Jabara’s mother, Haifa, filed a restraining order against Majors saying he “harassed” and “stalked” her by “knocking at windows late at nite, harassing me with ugly sex words over the phone, taking pictures and harassing my helper in garage.” In March of 2015, Majors was arrested for violating the restraining order, having accosted her and told her “F––– you and I want to kill you,” according to a police report cited by the Post, and his trial on those charges was set for October.

On Sept. 12, 2015, Haifa was discovered on the side of the road with a “severely broken left arm, a broken nose, and road rash all over her body,” according to a police report cited by the Post.


From the Post:

When police located Majors inside an apartment complex near the scene of the hit-and-run, “he was extremely drunk and urinating, without the use of his hands, through his open pants,” according to an incident report.

“Is she ok? Haifa?” Majors said, according to the police report. “I was out driving my car, drunk. I’m always drunk and you guys never stop me. And there was this rabbit, and Haifa jumped out in front of my car.”

“Majors went on to repeat this with variations including that he ‘hit her’ and ‘I left because I was scared,'” the officer wrote in the report. Police found his car with its windshield shattered and “what appeared to be blood or tissue stuck on it.”

Majors, who court records showed was married to a man in 2014, told police that the family “were filthy Lebanese and they throw gay people off roof tops,” a police report stated. Majors was charged with assault and battery with a deadly weapon, leaving the scene of a collision involving injury, violating a protective order, and public intoxication.

Then eight months after his arrest, according to the Tulsa World, LaFortune ignored a plea from prosecutors who argued that Majors should not be offered bond—or to have bond set higher than it was—because he “demonstrated a wanton disregard for the life of the victim and the safety of the public.” Bail was set at just over $70,000, Majors posted bond, and was released.

Family friend Rebecca Abou-Chedid told the Post that she felt the current political climate was partially responsible for the deaths. “After 9/11 you did not see the rhetoric that you see now. It’s gotten so much worse,” she said. “If crazy people keep hearing that Mexicans are rapists and Arabs are terrorists, well then who are crazy people going to take their craziness out on?” While Majors reportedly verbally harassed the family by calling them “Mooslems,” Abou-Chedid told the Post that the Jabara family was Christian.

Jeremy Stahl is a Slate senior editor. You can follow him on Twitter.

Posted on: 8/17 19:32
Top


Re: Republican Convention
#19
Home away from home
Home away from home


http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Justice/ ... -confront-climate-of-fear


After shooting of imam, N.Y. Muslims confront climate of fear


USA Justice
After shooting of imam, N.Y. Muslims confront climate of fear
csmonitor icon
Latest News



Most members of the Bangladeshi community in Ozone Park insist the execution-style killings of an imam and his assistant just after prayers Saturday were hate crimes.
By Harry Bruinius, Staff writer August 16, 2016

New York — Over a decade ago, Sahabuddin Chowdhury opened his modest auto repair and body shop on Atlantic Avenue in Queens, right on the northernmost border of Ozone Park, when his teenage daughter and son were still very young.

He was part of a wave of immigrants from Bangladesh that over the past two decades has made this traditionally working class neighborhood another of New York’s mosaic of “littles.”

“We work hard here, we pray, we go to the mosque, we pray five times a day,” he says. “Our children grow up for the Muslim community, and we are proud to be the Muslims. We are making a peaceful life in this community.”
Recommended: Sunni and Shiite Islam: Do you know the difference? Take our quiz.

On Monday, however, Mr. Chowdhury closed his single-garage shop at noon and slowly made his way through the side streets to Ozone Park – where a number of single-owner yellow cabs sit parked in front of the rows of single-family houses, many with American flags out front. He was on his way to attend a Salat al-Janazah funeral prayer for a local imam and his assistant – an event attended by local officials, including New York Mayor Bill de Blasio.
Test your knowledge Sunni and Shiite Islam: Do you know the difference? Take our quiz.
Photos of the Day Week two action at the Rio Olympics

The religious leaders, Imam Maulana Alauddin Akonjee and his assistant Thara Miah, were shot and killed execution style, in broad daylight and near the neighborhood’s elevated subway tracks, minutes after they walked from midday prayers at a mosque two blocks away.

“I’ve never seen this happen, I’ve never seen this in my life,” Chowdhury says, noting that the neighborhood is not without its problems. “The imam just finished the prayer, and now – we are very, very upset. My kids, we are very now – they are feeling very unsafe about what’s going on. My daughter, my son, they are crying, say[ing], 'Daddy, don’t go outside, it’s unsafe.' It’s not a good time for our people.”

It’s been a refrain of many American Muslims over the past year, as community advocates and even President Obama cite a growing climate of fear among Muslim residents. A growing list of threats and acts of violence and intimidation across the nation have set many communities on edge.

“See my beard, see my clothing – I am a Muslim, anybody can hit me, anybody can shoot me,” says Mia Parvez, a tourism and travel agent wearing a light panjabi long shirt and traditional tupi cap. He has started to become more politically active this year, he says, becoming an organizer for the local Bangladeshi community. “So this is the problem now, everybody scared now, not like before.”

Police arrested a Brooklyn man, Oscar Morel, later on Monday. He was charged with second-degree murder and criminal possession of a weapon, police said, but they caution that a motive has not yet been established. Imam Akonjee was carrying $1,000 cash, according to police, but security cameras captured the quick execution-style shootings and police believe robbery was not a motive.

Most members of the Bangladeshi community in the area insist that is was a hate crime – even though many said they had mostly felt safe in this Ozone Park enclave in the past few months.

Muhammad Asrab Khan, like Chowdhury, is wearing a dusty T-shirt and work boots as he makes his way to the Janazah service – even as the majority of the men gathering are attired in traditional garb like Mr. Parvez – familiar clothing now on the streets of this “Little Bangladesh” in Ozone Park.

Mr. Asrab Khan is an electrician, a small-business owner who installs security cameras, mostly as a subcontractor for the General Services Administration, the federal agency that oversees government buildings and maintenance.

He, too, was part of the influx of Bangladeshis who arrived in the past decade and have become legal residents – about 15,000 per year, according to the Department of Homeland Security, with New York being the top destination.

“I am a contractor, and so many people here, they work for the government, work for the union, they try to build up our lives in Amrika,” Asrab Khan says, using the common pronunciation for America in the community. “A lot of Bengali people, they are doctors and engineers and teachers – they support our community, our government, and our police officers.”

Not too long ago, this area was knows as the “Little Italy of Queens.” Before that, German and Irish workers helped build the row houses along the neighborhood’s side streets. Even earlier, back in the 19th century, French factory workers here produced pots.

And now Chowdhury and others here know well the idea of what they sometimes refer to as the “Amrikan dream” – a chance to provide their children with a better home, a better education, and in certain ways a better life.

As a member of the Chittagong Association of North America, an advocacy group for Bangladeshis headquartered in Brooklyn, Asrab Khan says communities in New York have not necessarily experienced the same kind of overt acts of intimidation and violence that some other communities in the US have experienced.

“But some political leaders are talking anti-Muslim, the sentiment is going up,” says Kazi Hussain, former president of the Chittagong Association. “This is a bad thing, this is dangerous thing – for democracy. So I’d like to say, Donald Trump, please stop your speech against the Muslims.”

During the service, angry cries of “We want justice!” often interrupted those speaking.

"I want you to know we are all mourning with you," Mayor de Blasio told the crowd of more than 1,000 Muslim men attending the funeral prayers. The two victims "were examples of goodness and righteousness," he said.

“In Islam, the loss of a person is regarded as not just a loss for their family, but for the entire community,” the mayor continued. “That’s something we as New Yorkers understand, again across all faiths, across all neighborhoods... We're not going to listen to those voices who try to divide us. We will stand up to them each and every time," he said. "We will make sure that whoever did this is brought to justice, I can guarantee you that."

For Nasir Uddin, an undocumented worker who peddles perfumes and such near Manhattan’s Chinatown on Canal Street, the “Amrikan dream” has changed the lives of his American born children.

“I come here for one thing, mainly: education for my children,” he says. “My sons now have a rising life, my daughter has a rising life, even if I am not rising so much. Amrika feeds me, gives me a better life.”

Posted on: 8/17 19:29
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Re: Republican Convention
#20
Home away from home
Home away from home


http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slates ... gration_at_all_study.html

A Gallup Study Just Debunked the Most Popular Theories About Trump’s Rise

By Osita Nwanevu


A new Gallup working paper on Donald Trump supporters has exposed critical parts of the prevailing narrative about Trump’s rise as myths. According to the Washington Post’s write-up, the study—based on more than 87,000 interviews Gallup has done with Trump supporters over the past year—reveals that Trump supporters have not been significantly adversely impacted by trade or immigration, the two issues that have been the focal points of the Trump campaign. From the Post:

The Gallup analysis is the most comprehensive statistical profile of Trump's supporters so far. Jonathan Rothwell, the economist at Gallup who conducted the analysis, sorted the respondents by their Zip code and then compared those findings with a host of other data from a variety of sources. After statistically controlling factors such as education, age and gender, Rothwell was able to determine which traits distinguished those who favored Trump from those who did not, even among people who appeared to be similar in other respects.

Rothwell conducted this kind of analysis not only among the broad group of Americans polled by Gallup. He was also able to focus specifically on white respondents, and even just on white Republicans. In general, his results were the same regardless of the group analyzed.

Rothwell’s analysis found that those who support Trump are more affluent than those who do not and that Trump supporters may even be more affluent than generic white Republicans, who tend to earn more than most Americans. Trump supporters are also only slightly more likely to be unemployed than all nonsupporters when controlling for geography and other factors, but are no more likely to be so than whites or white Republicans.

The study also suggests that while blue-collar workers with low levels of education are significantly more likely to support Trump, those workers are not, for the most part, factory workers who have been hit by trade and the decline of American manufacturing. “The Gallup analysis shows that Americans who live in places where employment in manufacturing has declined since 1990 are not more favorable to Trump,” the Washington Post’s Max Ehrenfreund and Jeff Guo write. “Rothwell did not find a relationship when he focused only on white respondents, either, or even specifically on white Republicans.” In fact, Rothwell writes in the study that Trump attracts less support in regions where trade has had a greater impact on manufacturing. “Surprisingly, there appears to be no link whatsoever between exposure to trade competition and support for nationalist policies in America, as embodied by the Trump campaign,” he says.

But Rothwell also writes that there is genuine malaise at the heart of at least some support for Trump—blue-collar workers without college degrees obviously fare worse in the economy than other Americans. Additionally, those in areas where intergenerational mobility has fallen flat and where physical health has been poor were more likely to have favorable views of Trump. Still, Trump’s abysmal numbers with minorities, including blue-collar minorities who have been faring similarly poorly to the blue-collar whites that back Trump, indicate that support for him is not purely economically motivated.

The study paints a similar picture on immigration. From the Post:

Although Trump voters tend to be the most skeptical about immigration, they are also the least likely to actually encounter an immigrant in their neighborhood.


Rothwell finds that people who live in places with many Hispanic residents or places close to the Mexican border, tend not to favor Trump—relative to otherwise similar Americans and to otherwise similar white Republicans.

Among those who are similar in terms of income, education and other factors, those who view Trump favorably are more likely to be found in white enclaves—racially isolated Zip codes where the amount of diversity is lower than in surrounding areas.

The study, of course, won't change anything about the Trump campaign. As we’ve seen, imagined grievances make for good politics.

Posted on: 8/13 16:01
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Re: Republican Convention
#21
Home away from home
Home away from home


American Nazi Chair: Trump Win Would Be “A Real Opportunity” For White Nationalists

“Now, if Trump does win, okay, it’s going to be a real opportunity for people like white nationalists, acting intelligently to build upon that…”


https://www.buzzfeed.com/andrewkaczyns ... erm=.niJRvmRdl#.tw2wyYwQg

Posted on: 8/7 0:17
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Re: Republican Convention
#22
Home away from home
Home away from home


The only thing more absurd and frightening than Drumpf....are the people supporting this con artist.

Posted on: 8/6 12:15
Top


Re: Republican Convention
#23
Home away from home
Home away from home



How Donald Trump Created The Worst Week Any Candidate’s Ever Had
Here are all 16 of Trump’s terrible gaffes this week.





WASHINGTON ? For Donald Trump, the past week has marked a fresh low in a campaign that has already sunk modern American politics to new levels.

But unlike the GOP presidential nominee’s previous nadirs ? such as his call for a blanket travel ban on Muslims, or his false claim that the father of Texas Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) was involved in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy ? this week has actually hurt Trump’s campaign. A lot. Polls taken late this week show Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton leading Trump by double digits nationwide. The businessman is even behind in deep red states like Georgia. So what happened?

The short answer is that Trump waged war against everyone from the family of a fallen soldier, to his party’s top officials, to a baby who cried at one of his rallies. He’s given voters, GOP lawmakers and potential donors a laundry list of reasons to steer clear of his campaign. Here’s how Trump’s terrible week went down.

Saturday, July 30: Trump attacked Khizr and Ghazala Khan, a Gold Star military family whose son was killed in Iraq in 2004. The couple appeared on stage together at the Democratic National Convention, where Khzir Khan criticized Trump, saying the GOP nominee “smears the character of Muslims.”

Trump responded by insulting the Khans and ignoring their sacrifice. “If you look at his wife, she was standing there, she had nothing to say, she probably — maybe she wasn’t allowed to have anything to say, you tell me,” Trump told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos on Saturday. “Mr. Khan, who has never met me, has no right to stand in front of millions of people and claim I have never read the Constitution, and say many other inaccurate things.”

In the same ABC interview, Trump complained about the presidential debate schedule. “It’s against two NFL games. I got a letter from the NFL saying ‘This is ridiculous,’” he whined. Within hours, a spokesman for the NFL said the former reality TV personality was lying.

Asked about changes to the GOP party platform that seemed to benefit Russia, Trump told ABC, that Russian President Vladimir Putin was not sending forces into Ukraine. “Just so you understand, he’s not going to go into Ukraine, all right,” he said.

Informed that Russia had annexed part of Ukraine in 2014, Trump flubbed, “OK, well, he’s there in a certain way, but I’m not there yet.”



Early Monday, August 1: Trump renewed his attacks on the Khans.

Monday afternoon: Trump attacked the fire marshal overseeing a rally in Columbus, Ohio, saying the first responder “ought to be ashamed of himself,” because “they turned away thousands of people.” It was the second time in a week he’d attacked firefighters. Trump had speculated in Colorado Springs on July 29 that the fire marshal in charge was probably a Democrat, and he called the enforcement of fire code occupancy limits “a disgraceful situation.”

Monday 7:25 p.m.: Trump praised Paul Nehlen, the Wisconsin primary challenger vying to unseat Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan.

Monday 8:35 p.m.: USA Today contributor Kristen Powers reported how the GOP nominee said that if his daughter Ivanka Trump were ever sexually harassed at work, he’d expect her to quit her job. “I would like to think she would find another career or find another company if that was the case,” he said.

Early Tuesday: Trump’s son, Eric Trump, doubled down on the idea that women who are victims of sexual harassment have done something to deserve it. “Ivanka is a strong, powerful woman” Eric Trump told CBS This Morning. His sister “wouldn’t allow herself” to be subjected to sexual harassment.

Tuesday, late morning: Donald Trump told a supporter at a rally in Ashburn, Virginia, to remove her crying baby. He’d said moments before to the same woman, “Don’t worry about that baby, I love babies. I hear that baby crying, I like it.”

“Actually, I was only kidding,” Trump said seconds later. “You can get the baby out of here.” When it seemed like the woman had left, an incredulous sounding Trump told the crowd, “I think she really believed me! That I love having a baby crying while I’m speaking!”
X

Tuesday around lunchtime: In a wide-ranging interview with The Washington Post, Trump went out of his way to say he could not endorse three leading Republicans: Ryan, Arizona Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte. (R-N.H.)

The three snubs all appeared to be vindictive attempts by Trump to exact revenge on fellow Republicans he felt had been critical of him. Both Ryan and McCain have formally endorsed Trump already, but they also denounced his attacks on a federal judge and on the Khan family, respectively.

Tuesday evening: For the second time in two days, Trump peddled the notion that the November elections would be “rigged” against him. He said on Fox News that court rulings striking down voter identity laws were discriminatory and would likely lead to fraud on Election Day. “People are going to walk in there, they’re going to vote 10 times, maybe. Who knows? They’re going to vote 10 times,” Trump said.

Wednesday midday: During a rally in Daytona Beach, Florida, Trump vividly described watching a video of currency being unloaded from an airplane that he said was shot in Iran. “I’ll never forget the scene this morning,” Trump said. “Iran ? I don’t think you’ve heard this anywhere but here ? Iran provided all of that footage, the tape, of taking that money off that airplane.”

The only problem was that what he actually saw was a publicly available video that was months old ? and shot in Geneva, Switzerland. It did not show the exchange of cash, it was not “top secret,” as Trump claimed, it was not “a military tape” and it was not “provided by Iran.”
X

Early Thursday: Trump’s campaign admitted that all the candidate had ever seen was the old footage from Switzerland, not military video from Iran. But that didn’t keep Trump from repeating the lie again.

Thursday afternoon: The real estate businessman insisted to a crowd in Portland, Maine, he’d seen a secretive Iranian video. “It was interesting because a tape was made,” he said. “Right? You saw that? With the airplane coming in? Nice plane. And the airplane coming and the money coming off, I guess, right? That was given to us, has to be, by the Iranians.”

Thursday evening: The damage Trump had been doing to his campaign all week finally began to show up in polls, where the Republican nominee trailed Clinton by 9 to 15 points nationally. Even more worrying for Republicans, however, were the double digit leads that Clinton was achieving in battleground states.



Friday morning: Trump acknowledged in a Twitter post that he had not, in fact, seen any video from Iran.

As if to underscore how irresponsible Trump’s comments on Iran had been, former CIA acting director Mike Morell penned a scathing condemnation of Trump, published in The New York Times on Friday morning.

He suggested in the article that the GOP nominee was being manipulated by Putin, himself a former Russian intelligence officer. “In the intelligence business, we’d say that Mr. Trump was an unwitting agent of the Russian Federation,” Morell wrote.

Friday afternoon: As Trump’s party, and his potential donors panicked all week, the presidential candidate repeatedly said how united the GOP was behind him, a point he reiterated at two rallies on Friday with his vice presidential running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

Friday evening: The only sign that Trump had any intention of shifting the momentum of his disastrous campaign came late on Friday in Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he read formal endorsements of Ryan, McCain and Ayotte from a sheet of paper.

While this may have been enough to satisfy Republican party leaders desperate to find some redeeming quality in Trump’s campaign, a few minutes of politeness isn’t likely to repair the damage from his hellish week.

Only 12 more weeks to go...


Editor’s note: Donald Trump regularly incites political violence and is a serial liar, rampant xenophobe, racist, misogynist and birther who has repeatedly pledged to ban all Muslims ? 1.6 billion members of an entire religion ? from entering the U.S.
Also on HuffPost



Posted on: 8/6 12:13
Top


Re: Republican Convention
#24
Home away from home
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Well DRUMPF just ripped off 3 little girls.....yep he sure is a great financial guru.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UOKh00-GuY

Posted on: 8/6 0:07
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Re: Republican Convention
#25
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Good to see Trump and his supporters setting up the Hitler Youth.....

http://www.latimes.com/nation/politic ... 1470156548-htmlstory.html


Child yells profanity directed at Hillary Clinton during Donald Trump rally

A school-age child at a Donald Trump rally on Tuesday stood up and yelled "Take the bitch down" after the candidate mentioned Hillary Clinton. His mother later defended the child's right to speak and blamed his language on "Democratic schools."

The child, who looked no more than 10, was sitting next to his mother in the media section.

The mother identified herself in a brief interview with a small group of reporters as Pam Kohler of Mount Vernon, Va., but she would not name her son or say how old he is.

“He's a minor so he can't be interviewed,” Kohler said.

“I think he has a right to speak what he wants to," she said.

Asked where he learned to speak that way, she answered, "Democratic schools."

As more reporters began surrounding her, she walked out of the auditorium at Briar Woods High School, where the rally was held, using a Trump sign to block cameras. Behind her seats was a school sign, encouraging good behavior: "Trustworthy, Respectful, United, Excellent."

Posted on: 8/4 0:08
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Re: Democratic Convention
#26
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Here are the true facts if you care to take off your tin foil hat an read them.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politic ... 8-0cb344221131_story.html


TRUMP, in a tweet Wednesday: “Our incompetent Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, was the one who started talks to give 400 million dollars, in cash, to Iran. Scandal!”

THE FACTS: Trump is wrong about Clinton’s involvement. The $400 million payment — plus $1.3 billion in interest to be paid later — is a separate issue from the Iran nuclear deal that Clinton initiated. The process that resulted in the payout started decades before she became secretary of state.

In the late 1970s the Iranian government, under the U.S.-backed shah, paid the United States $400 million for military equipment. The equipment was never delivered because in 1979, his government was overthrown, revolutionaries took American hostages at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, and diplomatic relations between the United States and Iran were severed.

In 1981, the United States and Iran agreed to set up a commission at The Hague that would rule on claims by each country for property and assets held by the other. Iran’s claim for return of the equipment payment was among many that had been tied up in litigation before the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal, and interest the U.S. owed for holding the money for so long was growing.

Litigation over these claims has continued intermittently for 35 years, with some being settled and others going to the tribunal for judgment. All private U.S. claims before the tribunal have been resolved, with Iran paying more than $2.5 billion to American people and businesses. Some claims remain unresolved.

As secretary of state, Clinton did initiate secret talks with Iran over its nuclear program. After John Kerry succeeded her on Feb. 1, 2013, those secret contacts grew into 18 months of formal negotiations that culminated in the July 2015 nuclear deal.

U.S. officials had expected a ruling on the Iranian claim from the tribunal any time, and feared a ruling that would have made the interest payments much higher. As the nuclear talks progressed, the separate, intermittent talks on the military-equipment claim continued.

On Jan. 17, a day after the nuclear deal was implemented, the United States and Iran announced they had settled the claim, with the U.S. agreeing to pay the $400 million principal along with $1.3 billion in interest. Administration statements at the time made clear that the principal and the interest would be paid separately, but did not specify how the money would be delivered.

Trump is correct that the $400 million was paid in cash and flown to Tehran on a cargo plane. But litigation on the Iranian claim preceded Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state by decades and heated up only after she left the job.

___

TRUMP: “When they took our sailors, they forced them to their knees and the only reason we got them back is that we hadn’t paid the money yet. And that’s the only reason we got ‘em back. Otherwise, they would’ve had to wait until I became president.”

THE FACTS: There is no evidence that the episode with the sailors was related to the Iran deal or the 1970s payment.

On Jan. 12, four days before the Iran deal was implemented and five days before the payment was delivered, 10 sailors veered off course in two small boats and landed on an island in the Persian Gulf where there’s an Iranian military installation. They were held at gunpoint and released the next day after negotiations between Secretary of State John Kerry and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. The Navy has disciplined many of the sailors and their commanders for the navigation error that led to an international incident.

___

TRUMP: “It looks like we paid $400 million for the hostages.”

THE FACTS: There is no concrete evidence that the cash payment was, in fact, a ransom.

Critics of the Iran deal, including many senior Republican lawmakers, maintain that the $400 million settlement was a ransom for the release of four private American citizens jailed in Tehran and freed a day after the Iran deal was implemented. Some Iranian officials have suggested the same thing. The Obama administration has flatly denied it has ever paid ransoms, including in this case.

The timing of the prisoner release and the arrival of the payment has given weight to GOP claims. U.S. officials acknowledge that progress in the nuclear negotiations contributed to progress on the settlement of the claim as well as progress in talks on the release of the Americans.

___

TRUMP: “Iran provided all of that footage, the tape of them taking that money. ... Over there when that plane landed, top secret ... and they have a perfect tape, done by obviously a government camera and the tape is of the people taking the money off the plane, right. In order to embarrass us further, Iran sent us the tapes, right. It’s a military tape, it’s a tape. It was a perfect angle, nice and steady, nobody getting nervous because they’re gonna be shot.”

Local Politics Alerts

Breaking news about local government in D.C., Md., Va.

THE FACTS: Several senior U.S. officials involved in the Iran negotiations said Wednesday they weren’t aware of any such footage.

Posted on: 8/3 23:58
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Re: Jersey City Muslims Unite Against Trump
#27
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I am going to highlight some of the interesting findings of Professor Pape.....I would encourage the reading of the entire text.

http://chicagopolicyreview.org/2015/0 ... m-and-u-s-foreign-policy/


Your 2005 book, Dying to Win, documents a number of remarkable findings about suicide terrorism. Who are suicide terrorists, and what are they after?


For the most part they’re responding to the military occupation of a community that they care a lot about.

I put together the first complete data set of suicide attacks after 9/11. I did that because, like many people who come into suicide terrorism, I thought I was going to figure out when an Islamic fundamentalist goes from being a devout, observant Muslim to somebody who then is suicidally violent. But there was no data available, so I put together this complete database of suicide attacks around the world from the early 1980s to 2003.

I was really struck that half the suicide attacks were secular. I began to look at the patterns and I noticed that they were tightly clustered, both in where they occurred and the timing, and that 95 percent of the suicide attacks were in response to a military occupation.



Speaking of ISIS and information, what is your reaction to The Atlantic’s March cover story, “What ISIS Really Wants”?


I think it’s just wrong. [The author Graeme] Wood is painting a picture of ISIS as all religious, all the time. Interestingly in the second section he is talking about how the main difference with Osama bin Laden’s Al Qaeda is that ISIS really wants territory.

Wanting territory means there’s a community that wants a state. ISIS, and most suicide groups, are driven by an ideal of nationalism; they want to control their destiny with a state. ISIS is composed of a leadership of about 25 people, which is one-third very heavily religious, for sure; one-third former Saddam [Hussein] military officers who are Baathists, who are secular; and one-third who are Sunni militia, Sunni tribal leaders. That just conveniently is lost in the Wood piece.

It’s definitely the case that ISIS wants to kill people who are not part of its community. But this is normal in nationalist groups. (Hutu wanted to kill Tutsi; they also wanted to kill moderate Hutu who didn’t want to kill Tutsi.)

Posted on: 7/23 7:42
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Re: Jersey City Muslims Unite Against Trump
#28
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Um okay...here ya go even back further

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_in_Afghanistan_(1978%E2%80%93present)

quote]
TheBigGuy wrote:
Not quite... you have only rationalized global Muslim Terror since 2003, the start of the 2nd Iraqi War. Excluding Sept 9, 2011... in the previous decade when Bill Clinton was President, Al Qaeda attacked WTC #1, US Embassies Kenya & Tanzania, Bombing of USS Cole, all which would have been considered acts of war. And I only mention attacks on US... It seems like you and your like minded ilk think that the global Muslim terror threat only started because of George Bush. Conveniently and dangerously shortsighted. As I think about it now, one could say that Hillary's husband's inadequate responses to those attacks lead to 911? It is nice to know 15 years later it is all Bush "the lying CHRSITIAN's" fault.



Quote:

Asif wrote:


All terror an hate is wrong....killing innocents can't be justified.

You and your like minded ilk only seem to think terror comes from one particular group.

If you know your history....ISIS came out of the mess from the Iraq war....a war crime...a terror plot....orchestrated...by..say it with me....now....a lying CHRISTIAN............mission accomplished...



Quote:

TheBigGuy wrote:
So you support and justify global Muslim terror as a fair and balanced response to the 2nd Iraq War? BTW Hillary voted for that war. Surprised you didn't blame today's incident on Trump's acceptance speech.


Quote:

Asif wrote:
I know all the conservatives and neo-cons on this forum like balance and fairness.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_War

Let's not forget this sophisticated deliberately planned terror attack...for oil and revenge led by a man who claimed he was a christian and was not a liar. Hundreds of thousands died directly and indirectly...and we are still paying for it.

This led to cruel torture, kidnapping and assassinations without any trials.



Quote:

TheBigGuy wrote:
Uh oh Pebbles... I think we just heard a "peep from one bad apple" who was part of the Muslim refugee population in Germany. I wonder how all the terror survivors of these weekly attacks feel about your benign metaphor dismissing the scale and scope of global Muslim terror. Noticed that all you Muslim Terror deniers have been quiet this week hoping this thread would roll off the main menu. Here we are again!
[/quote]

Posted on: 7/23 7:21
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Re: Jersey City Muslims Unite Against Trump
#29
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All terror an hate is wrong....killing innocents can't be justified.

You and your like minded ilk only seem to think terror comes from one particular group.

If you know your history....ISIS came out of the mess from the Iraq war....a war crime...a terror plot....orchestrated...by..say it with me....now....a lying CHRISTIAN............mission accomplished...



Quote:

TheBigGuy wrote:
So you support and justify global Muslim terror as a fair and balanced response to the 2nd Iraq War? BTW Hillary voted for that war. Surprised you didn't blame today's incident on Trump's acceptance speech.


Quote:

Asif wrote:
I know all the conservatives and neo-cons on this forum like balance and fairness.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_War

Let's not forget this sophisticated deliberately planned terror attack...for oil and revenge led by a man who claimed he was a christian and was not a liar. Hundreds of thousands died directly and indirectly...and we are still paying for it.

This led to cruel torture, kidnapping and assassinations without any trials.



Quote:

TheBigGuy wrote:
Uh oh Pebbles... I think we just heard a "peep from one bad apple" who was part of the Muslim refugee population in Germany. I wonder how all the terror survivors of these weekly attacks feel about your benign metaphor dismissing the scale and scope of global Muslim terror. Noticed that all you Muslim Terror deniers have been quiet this week hoping this thread would roll off the main menu. Here we are again!

Posted on: 7/23 2:15
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Re: Republican Convention
#30
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We Americans will defeat this two bit demagogue....this pale Hitler wanna be shall not be elected..... he can go back to being the two bit con artist that he is.

Posted on: 7/22 22:32
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