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Marble Fireplace Mantle Removal
#1
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Not too shy to talk


Can anyone please recommend someone who can safely remove a marble fireplace mantle. I need to have it removed then re-installed. Thanks.

Posted on: 2016/6/30 16:03
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Re: Heights Renovation Worth It?
#2
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Quote:

jcguy05 wrote:
Quote:

MDM wrote:
A home is a home.. not an investment. If you can afford the renovation work and the property tax increase that will come from it.. do it. You only live once and it is better to live in a home with a good kitchen (which is something my wife reminds me constantly that we DON'T have yet... landlord's apartment gets done last).

You might also qualify for the 5 year abatement. You should take that into account as well when putting your budget together.


I disagree, a home is ALWAYS an investment, and probably most people's biggest investment. It is an asset just like any asset you have, if you invest poorly, you will be poorer..

It doesnt matter if you plan to live in it until you die, you will never know what happens tomorrow that may cause you to sell. If you want to use that argument, than same can be said about anything - i will never sell this stock, i will never sell my gold bars..etc.. until you actually need to sell it..

Regards to the OP question, you need to look at it as a percentage of your current property value. If your house is worth 1mil, 60k is only a 6% and probably a good deal that will increase the overall property value long term.

But if you house is 100k, that becomes 60%, then you have to be batsht crazy to make that kind of investment.

Kitchen redo + 1 bath are both pretty higher on the list as far as investment vs return is concerned. My own opinion is ~10% or lower of the property value sounds good, especially since you will get enjoyment/use out of it now.


Going off of Zillow's estimate, I'm looking at about 20%.

Posted on: 2016/5/21 10:03
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Re: Heights Renovation Worth It?
#3
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Yeah I totally agree about the quality of life aspect. Is there a way to roughly estimate what the increase to property tax would be?

Posted on: 2016/5/14 9:19
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Heights Renovation Worth It?
#4
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Not too shy to talk


Hi guys, I know this is a broad question but I'm hoping it will at least get the conversation started. I am planning on renovating my kitchen and expanding the size of an existing addition off of the kitchen that is currently a half bath, allowing for a full bath and laundry area. Currently my washing machine is in the kitchen area and the dryer is next to the half bath in the existing addition.

We would also be installing a mini split system for the entire ground floor (kitchen/dining room) and adding a deck over the addition. Our home is in great shape (internally, the outside not so much), we have nice original wide plank wood floors throughout and other original features like fireplaces/crown molding. Cost for the reno has been estimated at around 60k, is this a sound investment for the area?

Posted on: 2016/5/13 23:17
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Re: Advice on fireplace
#5
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Quote:

Sommerman wrote:
Your fireplace looks like almost everyone I've seen downtown. It is shallow because it was never meant to burn anything (I was told). The hole in the cover is where the flue from the coal stove which sat in front of the fireplace connected to the chimney. Your mantle probably came from a catalog. It is possible that some of the houses dating from the 1840's have wood-burning fireplaces and so might the more luxurious later ones such as those on VVP. BTW, is your original flooring yellow or pumpkin pine rather than a fancier hardwood? That's because looms had just been invented to make wall-to-wall carpeting affordable (and your house warmer).
If anyone has a different explanation, I'd be eager to hear it. These houses were built during a time of technical advancement in heating, plumbing, energy, etc. I'm always curious for updates.


That makes sense, yes the floor is pine. I had to stain it a darker color because unfortunately someone had ripped out the metal vents (or whatever they were) from the floor and they had left a really bad patch job in every room. I had to buy reclaimed wide plank pine wood to repair the areas but unfortunately the color still didn't quite match. Once I applied stain the color matched perfectly and now I can't even tell where the patches were.

Anyway back to the fireplace. My goal is to restore my upstairs fireplaces and expose the brick in the bedrooms. They are completely covered and there's no mantle. I don't think I'd take on the project myself though since the same thing happens upstairs where some parts of the wall feel hollow and other don't. Looking through a hole I made inside the closet next to it (see picture below) adds to the confusion.

Any recommendations for a contractor who specializes in older homes?

Resized Image

Posted on: 2015/7/12 9:52
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Re: Advice on fireplace
#6
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Quote:

JCman24 wrote:
Quote:

Yardl3y wrote:
Hi all, wondering if anyone can help me figure out what was done to my fireplace. It looks like it was sealed however half of it is hollow and the other is filled in with brick. As you can see in the video below, the hollow side was covered using what looks like sticks and plaster which makes me think it was done long ago, but why? I assume they would have needed the fireplace to keep the room warm back then. Any help would be really appreciated as we're thinking about opening up the cavity.


https://youtu.be/BaD_YSnfMes





The top part where you're banging isn't necessarily hollow, though it could be. If there's slight separation in the covering over the bricks you could get a reverberation that sounds hollow. On the other hand, there could be a hole there because of failed brick or bricks that were removed to install a vent for an external coal heater. I had the latter... it was a quick job to refill with matching bricks and appropriate mortar.

The bottom is sealed with plaster and lath. It could have been done as recently as the 70s. A proper heating system was probably installed at some point and they sealed it up on the cheap to keep air from escaping up the chimney in the winter. You can just tear that stuff up with a claw hammer if no utilities were routed through the chimney.


Thanks for the reply. Why would they have sealed only half with brick though? Also when I look into the hollow part I can see wood beams from the homes structure, I don't understand how there could be exposed wood there being that it is a fireplace. My other fireplace is not sealed and is all brick inside.

Posted on: 2015/7/11 22:36
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Advice on fireplace
#7
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Hi all, wondering if anyone can help me figure out what was done to my fireplace. It looks like it was sealed however half of it is hollow and the other is filled in with brick. As you can see in the video below, the hollow side was covered using what looks like sticks and plaster which makes me think it was done long ago, but why? I assume they would have needed the fireplace to keep the room warm back then. Any help would be really appreciated as we're thinking about opening up the cavity.


https://youtu.be/BaD_YSnfMes




Posted on: 2015/7/11 18:05
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Re: How to dispose of treadmill
#8
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Thanks for the help everyone.

Posted on: 2015/7/1 8:12
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How to dispose of treadmill
#9
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Hi all, need to dispose of a broken treadmill in the Heights area. What to do?

Posted on: 2015/6/30 9:01
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Re: Wood Floor Repair - Not Refinish/Sanding
#10
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


PM's sent.

Posted on: 2013/4/30 9:16
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Re: Wood Floor Repair - Not Refinish/Sanding
#11
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Just PM'ed you the contact info.

Quote:

griffin wrote:
Not really yet. Seems like folks want to do full installs, still having a hard time finding someone to do repairs. Can you share?

Quote:

Yardl3y wrote:
did you find someone for this? I have a guy who did the same to my home with great results.

Posted on: 2013/4/29 18:58
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Re: Wood Floor Repair - Not Refinish/Sanding
#12
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


did you find someone for this? I have a guy who did the same to my home with great results.

Posted on: 2013/4/25 23:37
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Re: New York Ave-Heights-Construction
#13
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Not too shy to talk


are the 100 steps really under way?!

Posted on: 2013/4/25 23:14
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Person killed on Palisade and Franklin
#14
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Not too shy to talk


This happened last Saturday September 8th. Has anyone heard about this? I didn't actually witness it but my parents who were visiting drove by the scene and said there was a shirtless body on the ground and and a crowd around the scene with people crying. I haven't heard anything about this incident elsewhere.

Posted on: 2012/9/13 22:33
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Re: Landscape/paving contractor
#15
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Hi all, I'm looking for someone to do a small landscaping job. My backyard is about 27x13 in size and I'm thinking of laying down sod or seeds. Right now the grass is really patchy and the ground feels bumpy when walked on so I want it smoothed out. Can anyone recommend someone on the cheap? I'm willing to help. Thanks!

Posted on: 2012/4/14 18:41
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Re: Movies filmed in Jersey City
#16
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Not too shy to talk


Chappelle Show, "The Mad Real World" episode was shot in the building on the corner of Webster and Hutton. You can see shots of the exterior of the building throughout the episode.

Posted on: 2012/3/5 23:40
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Re: Car flipped over on Webster and Hutton
#17
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


It was late, the person driving the car above wasn't drunk or he would have been in hand cuffs. Don't know about the guy who hit him as he fled the scene.

Posted on: 2011/12/6 23:14
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Car flipped over on Webster and Hutton
#18
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Don't know how it happened, but I believe it was a hit and run. My guess is the victim was traveling down Webster and the offender struck him towards the rear of the car at a 90 degree angle while speeding down Hutton. He must have been going pretty fast, the car was flipped over on its side and facing the opposite direction.

Photobucket

Posted on: 2011/11/6 11:53
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Re: Have leak in house, need to patch exterior wall
#19
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Just looked today, the pavement slopes in the direction that the car is facing, away from the house towards the street. However it doesn't look like there is much of a slope side ways from the house towards the car. I'm not sure if the exterior wall is exactly at the same level as the inside where it gets wet but its just about the same level and the interior side of that wall is where the problem lies.

Posted on: 2011/10/13 19:05
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Re: Have leak in house, need to patch exterior wall
#20
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


I'm not sure how it slopes, I'll have to check tomorrow. Are you a contractor? If so let me know if you can come for an estimate/inspection. Thanks

Posted on: 2011/10/12 23:34
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Have leak in house, need to patch exterior wall
#21
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Hi all, I have some water coming into the house. It not flooding, but the edge of the wall inside is very moist and the old wood floors are soft and rotting on the very edge close to the wall. This is happening on the ground level of my 100 year old house. Below is a picture of the exterior of the wall where I think the water is coming in through. As you can see, there are brick lining the wall. Any suggestions on what to do/use to fix this problem? Thanks for your help!

Photobucket

Posted on: 2011/10/12 20:52
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Re: Wood floor sanding and varnishing
#22
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Staining floors this old scares me. I also wanted the natural color of the white pine. Now I'm thinking of just leaving it, even thinking of using water based poly which would leave the wood almost completely unchanged and very pale like the picture above as apposed to oil which will darken/yellow it a bit. Thing is, the reason I bought "reclaimed" wood was to get rid of the ugly patches someone else made on the floors, and while it looks better now being that the wood is the same width/thickness as the original, it still looks like a patch. I understand that wood oxidizes differently, but if you look at the close up above, the wood I was given doesn't even have the same grain as the original pine.

Posted on: 2011/8/20 0:31
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Re: Wood floor sanding and varnishing
#23
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Hi all, so I had the floors repaired with reclaimed white pine which is what I was told my original floors are. However, after sanding everything down, the reclaimed wood looks very different than the original. The picture below is test patch with sealer applied. The lighter wood is my original floor and the darker is the "reclaimed" wood, again this is with sealer applied. I really need some help/suggestions on getting the two to match. I wanted to go with a clear coat but I think the difference is too noticeable between the two and it would look like a big patch.

Photobucket

In this picture you can see the patch/repair against the rest of the floor. I have a repair like this in every room in the house.

Photobucket

Posted on: 2011/8/19 19:25
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Re: Wood floor sanding and varnishing
#24
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Awesome! I'm going to give them a call. Did they also do the paint removal for you?

Posted on: 2011/7/15 12:05
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Re: Wood floor sanding and varnishing
#25
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Thanks again bunny. I had a guy come out yesterday to give me an estimate and once again as expected he said he'd use oil based poly. He wasn't sure about Waterlox and said isn't that for decks? Hmm. I showed him the painted floor and he said he wouldn't be able to get it off because of the paint getting into the wide gaps between the boards. I'm have another guy coming out tomorrow, I'll see what he says.

Posted on: 2011/7/15 11:02
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Re: Wood floor sanding and varnishing
#26
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Thanks Chris, I'll give them a call. What method did they use on the painted floors? I have a room in the house that has painted floors and I'm going to have that done at a later time. What kind of finish did they use on the pine floor poly?

Posted on: 2011/7/14 18:15
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Re: Refinishing 100 yr old white pine floor
#27
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Thanks bunny. I've heard Waterlox mentioned before but doesn't Waterlox not allow you to use poly down the road if you wanted to because it seals the wood or something like that? Also about the floors not having enough surface, is there a certain portion of the wood that is considered the surface? I ask because the planks in my floor are 1" thick and its seems like you could sand away all you wanted. Thanks again.

Posted on: 2011/7/14 18:09
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Refinishing 100 yr old white pine floor
#28
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Not too shy to talk


Hello! We recently purchased our first home, a 100+ year old cozy little town house with great wide plank pine floors. A local restored wood place from which we ordered a few replacement planks told us it is white pine. The living room floor is in pretty rough shape compared to the rest of the house and we want to have it refinished. I've had two floor guys come take a look and they've both suggested polyurethane, seems like that's the standard. I'd love to hear suggestions as to how to go about refinishing the floor and what products to use. I don't want anyone to damage these beautiful old floors! We also want them to look as close to the rest of the house as possible after they're refinished. Here is a picture of the living room floor now, this is the section we're going to repair with the restored wood planks.

Photobucket

Posted on: 2011/7/14 16:18
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Re: Wood floor sanding and varnishing
#29
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Thanks eckster. Does your floor have a lot of gap space between the boards? I'm wondering if this matters in choosing what kind of finish/product to go with. It seems most floor guys like to use poly, I have yet to hear anyone I've spoken to suggest otherwise.

I'm only doing one room in the house and I want it to match the other rooms as close as possible in color/shine. I'm going to have someone come over for an estimate and I will ask them for some information but if anyone else can chime in I'd appreciate it. Here is a picture of the floor, this is a damage section that I'm going to repair with matching antique white pine.

Photobucket

Posted on: 2011/7/13 13:52
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Re: Structural question about row house
#30
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Thanks for the information

Posted on: 2011/7/13 9:28
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