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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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I understand that. But again the integral component of my point is that one of the main reason why many people move to urban areas is the convenience and the reduced reliance on cars. I honestly think people persuade themselves to believe that they NEED these huge SUVs. But in reality they don't. It's a trendy thing. It's not at all necessary for people living in JC. I'm entirely uninspired by all of the responses to my original post. People are just making excuses to have huge SUVs. I'm ok with the smaller SUVs, but these larger ones are just stupid. There are also quite a few utility trucks around. It's nonesense.
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bodhipooh wrote:


As already mentioned and explained by others, this is not a local phenomenon. This is a national trend, and so strong that Ford has announced plans to stop production of all sedans, except for the Mustang (they will also continue to make a Focus hatchback) and GMC recently announced plans to stop producing 6 vehicles, all sedans, with rumors of further cuts coming.

But, don't be so quick so ascribe all parking woes to people choosing SUVs over cars. Since 2006, Jersey City has grown by 13% (a little over 30K people) so there is obviously a lot more people, and many of those have cars, and most of the growth has happened in DTJC, so the growth percentage for DTJC is certainly higher than the city's overall growth rate.

Posted on: 2/1 8:42
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Or maybe people like well built, safer cars that offer performance advantages and generally retain more of their value.

Posted on: 2/1 8:30
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Quote:

tern wrote:
Getting back to the original poster...

Some people have a disproportionate amount of pride and self-worth tied up in their car, having a big ostentatious one means a lot to them.

Robin.


I'd say the same thi mb g about driving a Porsche BMW or Mercedes

Posted on: 2/1 7:53
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Getting back to the original poster...

Some people have a disproportionate amount of pride and self-worth tied up in their car, having a big ostentatious one means a lot to them.

Robin.

Posted on: 1/31 23:51
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Quote:

dr_nick_riviera wrote:
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bodhipooh wrote:
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dr_nick_riviera wrote:
...and to try and implement policies that discourage car use is 'social engineering'.


Huh? Are you trying to argue that "policies that discourage car use" is NOT social engineering!?

The very definition of social engineering is "the use of centralized planning in an attempt to manage social change and regulate the future development and behavior of a society".

Any policy enacted by a government entity that seeks to manage or regulate the behavior of society IS social engineering. And, of course, any policy to discourage car use is exactly that: social engineering.





Are you trying to argue 1:1 parking ratios and surface level parking lots everywhere somehow aren’t? Yvonne and the NA’s love to argue that eliminating parking minimums and discouraging car use are some nefarious government plot to infringe in their freedoms to have free street parking for life and that other taxpayers should subsidize their lifestyle at the expense of public transit and pedestrian friendly policies.

You’d better believe that Yvonne will rally the NA and her band of NIMBYs to thwart any Vision Zero initiatives or sensible policies to discourage car use.


I never expressed an opinion about parking regulations or policies. In fact, I have been open and clear in the past about my opinion of parking lots: we should not have so many empty lots all over DTJC, and the city should enforce parking regulations aggressively, and I also think the city could do more to encourage better pedestrian safety. But, that has nothing to do with what I was pointing out in my previous post, which is that you taking exception and questioning Monroe's characterization of parking regulations designed to discourage car usage as social engineering is completely off base.

Again, any government policy designed to control, influence, or regulate behavior is, by definition, social engineering.

Posted on: 1/31 23:22
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

dr_nick_riviera wrote:
...and to try and implement policies that discourage car use is 'social engineering'.


Huh? Are you trying to argue that "policies that discourage car use" is NOT social engineering!?

The very definition of social engineering is "the use of centralized planning in an attempt to manage social change and regulate the future development and behavior of a society".

Any policy enacted by a government entity that seeks to manage or regulate the behavior of society IS social engineering. And, of course, any policy to discourage car use is exactly that: social engineering.





Are you trying to argue 1:1 parking ratios and surface level parking lots everywhere somehow aren’t? Yvonne and the NA’s love to argue that eliminating parking minimums and discouraging car use are some nefarious government plot to infringe in their freedoms to have free street parking for life and that other taxpayers should subsidize their lifestyle at the expense of public transit and pedestrian friendly policies.

You’d better believe that Yvonne will rally the NA and her band of NIMBYs to thwart any Vision Zero initiatives or sensible policies to discourage car use.

Posted on: 1/31 22:03
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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MDM wrote:
I am looking at turning in my trusty, easy to park, wonderfully easy to drive hatchback if/when #2 kid comes along. If I put two car seats in my existing vehicle, the driver seat will be too forward for me to fit in the car (I am not a tall dude).

So it will be minivan, crossover, or SUV.

Test drive a Soul. Great car, dirt cheap, and the base model comes with tons of stuff like bluetooth that's higher trim on other cars. You'll swear there's a spacewarp that makes it bigger on the inside than it looks from the outside. It's wide, so you can probably get 2 kid seats in plus another passenger. I know we had 2 boosters and another kid. Plus you can get nice aftermarket roof rails and shlep sheets of plywood or drywall.

As far as the OP, a lot of what gets called an SUV or crossover is just a little hatchback on steroids, no bigger than an old Ford Escort on the inside, just jacked up. Strangely, the Soul is often put in that category, though it makes no claims to be a truck.

Posted on: 1/31 21:31
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Quote:

On_The_3rd wrote:
Manufacturers are building fewer and fewer cars (sedans) because most of America isn't buying them. Take Ford for example, they are axing all of their car lineup except for the Mustang and one other (can't remember). Our culture has a purchasing addiction, and because we have so much stuff, we needs places to put it, so we buy huge homes and huge cars to store all our shit. Eventually we buy so much stuff we run out of places to put it, so we "need to upgrade." Parents have also been convinced that the only way to bring a child into this world is to strap them into the back seat of a 2 ton, 16ft family car. 'Murica.


You try carpooling kids in car seats in your 2 door mustang

Posted on: 1/31 21:22
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Sutherland wrote:
When I first moved into my downtown home, there weren't too many cars parked on the streets. Certainly, parking was ample. From around 2006 that started to change with new construction and wealthier people moving into the neighborhood and JC in general. The most confounding phenomenon for me is the huge SUV phenomenon. I am not sure why so many people who have moved into a City area feel a need to have huge SUVs. One of the major benefits of living in an urban area as opposed to a suburban area is that you don't need to rely on a car so much. While I don't begrudge anyone a car to make special trips and all, I just can't comprehend the need for huge SUV's. I'm some how suspicious of the actual need. It seems the suburban mentality has set in our City. Certainly, it only unnecessarily exacerbates an already difficult parking crises.


As already mentioned and explained by others, this is not a local phenomenon. This is a national trend, and so strong that Ford has announced plans to stop production of all sedans, except for the Mustang (they will also continue to make a Focus hatchback) and GMC recently announced plans to stop producing 6 vehicles, all sedans, with rumors of further cuts coming.

But, don't be so quick so ascribe all parking woes to people choosing SUVs over cars. Since 2006, Jersey City has grown by 13% (a little over 30K people) so there is obviously a lot more people, and many of those have cars, and most of the growth has happened in DTJC, so the growth percentage for DTJC is certainly higher than the city's overall growth rate.

Posted on: 1/31 19:09
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Quote:

dr_nick_riviera wrote:
...and to try and implement policies that discourage car use is 'social engineering'.


Huh? Are you trying to argue that "policies that discourage car use" is NOT social engineering!?

The very definition of social engineering is "the use of centralized planning in an attempt to manage social change and regulate the future development and behavior of a society".

Any policy enacted by a government entity that seeks to manage or regulate the behavior of society IS social engineering. And, of course, any policy to discourage car use is exactly that: social engineering.




Posted on: 1/31 19:01
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Lol, I disagree with her more than I agree. And I’m pointing out the obvious.

Posted on: 1/31 15:14
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Quote:

Monroe wrote:
Women love to drive them. They feel safe, sit high, and carry a ton of stuff.

At the same time, urban density has also changed, and social engineering has led to developers being encouraged to underbuild on site parking, impacting street parking.


Ah, Yvonne's main lieutenant is trying to spread her propaganda that we desperately need more parking lots and parking spaces and to try and implement policies that discourage car use is 'social engineering'.

Posted on: 1/31 14:36
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Freakonomics guy famously investigated and found child safety seats no better than regular seatbelts.


That's incorrect. The University of Chicago Economist aka "Freakonomics guy" research indicates that child safety seat use is more beneficial in minor crashes than without. For major crashes, there was no significant (statistically) benefit over doing without.

In addition to their safety benefit, they provide better ergonomics, comfort, and visibility for the child.


Posted on: 1/31 14:24
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Car seats have gotten so beefed up, you could probably drop a kid from orbit in one, and he would survive.


Freakonomics guy famously investigated and found child safety seats no better than regular seatbelts.

http://freakonomics.com/2005/07/09/mo ... n-car-seats-vs-seat-belts

Robin.

Posted on: 1/31 14:18
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Having multiple little kids is another reason to get one.

If you have more than kid that requires a car seat, forget about driving something like a small hatchback.

Car seats have gotten so beefed up, you could probably drop a kid from orbit in one, and he would survive. The downside is they take up a lot of room. Add to the fact that in NJ, the car seat has to be rear facing until age two**. This takes up even more room.

I am looking at turning in my trusty, easy to park, wonderfully easy to drive hatchback if/when #2 kid comes along. If I put two car seats in my existing vehicle, the driver seat will be too forward for me to fit in the car (I am not a tall dude).

So it will be minivan, crossover, or SUV.

**NJ allows front facing before 2 if the kid is 30lbs or more. There is however, no exception granted for height. My poor kid knees are in his chest as a result. He is super tall for his age.

Posted on: 1/31 14:09
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Manufacturers are building fewer and fewer cars (sedans) because most of America isn't buying them. Take Ford for example, they are axing all of their car lineup except for the Mustang and one other (can't remember). Our culture has a purchasing addiction, and because we have so much stuff, we needs places to put it, so we buy huge homes and huge cars to store all our shit. Eventually we buy so much stuff we run out of places to put it, so we "need to upgrade." Parents have also been convinced that the only way to bring a child into this world is to strap them into the back seat of a 2 ton, 16ft family car. 'Murica.

Posted on: 1/31 12:42
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Re: The SUV Phenomenon
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Women love to drive them. They feel safe, sit high, and carry a ton of stuff.

At the same time, urban density has also changed, and social engineering has led to developers being encouraged to underbuild on site parking, impacting street parking.

Posted on: 1/31 12:07
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The SUV Phenomenon
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When I first moved into my downtown home, there weren't too many cars parked on the streets. Certainly, parking was ample. From around 2006 that started to change with new construction and wealthier people moving into the neighborhood and JC in general. The most confounding phenomenon for me is the huge SUV phenomenon. I am not sure why so many people who have moved into a City area feel a need to have huge SUVs. One of the major benefits of living in an urban area as opposed to a suburban area is that you don't need to rely on a car so much. While I don't begrudge anyone a car to make special trips and all, I just can't comprehend the need for huge SUV's. I'm some how suspicious of the actual need. It seems the suburban mentality has set in our City. Certainly, it only unnecessarily exacerbates an already difficult parking crises.

Posted on: 1/31 11:38
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