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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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user1111 wrote:
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tommyc_37 wrote:
I'm sorry, I'm not trying to be difficult or argumentative but it's a stretch to compare a 10 minute, 3-stop commute from Astoria/LIC via one swipe of the Metrocard, 24/7, to a Light Rail to Path commute from Greenville.


ummm you do realize that many people take a bus to the train in many places in Brooklyn, The Bronx, Queens, Staten Island etc... not every part of New York City is walking distance from a train station in the outer boroughs.


I 100% realize that. But the topic on hand is gentrification. And there are NOT many places that have gentrified that are not within walking distance of a subway. It's just the way it is. I actually can't think of any.

Posted on: 2015/9/12 0:24
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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Depends on where you work. I can get to work down by Old Slip, in Lower Manhattan, from the Square faster than coworkers who live in Manhattan. Making it to the border of Manhattan is not the goal, but to commute to work.

There are also people who live high up in Washington Heights, or the Bronx, or any of a number of other areas in NY that may be served just as well by living in further in parts of JC.

It depends on the value proposition each person has. But with such a huge population trying to live closer to NYC, a little more gentrification may be enough to bring people from the corners of the outer Burroughs, or from some more urban NJ suburbs like Linden or South Orange.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 23:21
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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tommyc_37 wrote:
I'm sorry, I'm not trying to be difficult or argumentative but it's a stretch to compare a 10 minute, 3-stop commute from Astoria/LIC via one swipe of the Metrocard, 24/7, to a Light Rail to Path commute from Greenville.


ummm you do realize that many people take a bus to the train in many places in Brooklyn, The Bronx, Queens, Staten Island etc... not every part of New York City is walking distance from a train station in the outer boroughs.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 23:15
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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I'm sorry, I'm not trying to be difficult or argumentative but it's a stretch to compare a 10 minute, 3-stop commute from Astoria/LIC via one swipe of the Metrocard, 24/7, to a Light Rail to Path commute from Greenville.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 22:42
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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bodhipooh wrote:
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papadage wrote:
And yet, decades ago, people moved into DTJC, when it was much crappier than many parts of JC that are criticized now. It used to be dirty, crime ridden, with no amenities at all. I am not saying that the other parts of town will gentrify tomorrow, but they will.

Inexpensive rents and lower sale prices, for more square footage, will attract the next wave of gentrification over time.


You can get super cheap housing in Detroit. Excellent price per square foot!

-SNIP-


Neither of which are across the river from Manhattan, so the ridiculous comparisons don't matter, do they? Who the heck wanted to live in Astoria, or even Long Island City and commute to Manhattan a few years ago?

Th rest of Jersey City is becoming more desirable as the rents and sale prices downtown continue to escalate. A big part of Greenville and the West Side is a ten minute walk from any of the Light Rail stops in the area. And those areas have commercial and retail strips that can gentrify to attract the amenities that will be needed for that the snowball.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 22:14
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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JcDevil wrote:
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user1111 wrote:
FYI when I lived dtjc and the lightrail first opened up in 2001 me and some my friends would ride it into other areas and we could not believe NO ONE would ever get on it.. it was the strangest thing it was a train for no one.

I take it daily now to work and play, and if you leave before 9 am its now standing room only. My stop Richard street never had any proffesional people getting on back in 2010 just a few students, now that's all you see in the A.M. and P.M rush hours. People are slow to catch on, but they are catching on. GV is a 5 min ride on rail to dtjc and 30 min to WTC.


It's just unfortunate that outside of the rush periods, it's a 25 minute wait before that 5 minute ride.

Depart :
Richard St
Arrive :
Jersey Avenue
Total Travel
Time
05:20 AM 05:26 AM 6 minutes
05:34 AM 05:40 AM 6 minutes
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The rail comes very often, and if I don't want to wait during non rush hours, I can drive my car or take uber or a bike.


Posted on: 2015/9/11 20:45
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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user1111 wrote:
FYI when I lived dtjc and the lightrail first opened up in 2001 me and some my friends would ride it into other areas and we could not believe NO ONE would ever get on it.. it was the strangest thing it was a train for no one.

I take it daily now to work and play, and if you leave before 9 am its now standing room only. My stop Richard street never had any proffesional people getting on back in 2010 just a few students, now that's all you see in the A.M. and P.M rush hours. People are slow to catch on, but they are catching on. GV is a 5 min ride on rail to dtjc and 30 min to WTC.


It's just unfortunate that outside of the rush periods, it's a 25 minute wait before that 5 minute ride.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 20:37
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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FYI when I lived dtjc and the lightrail first opened up in 2001 me and some my friends would ride it into other areas and we could not believe NO ONE would ever get on it.. it was the strangest thing it was a train for no one.

I take it daily now to work and play, and if you leave before 9 am its now standing room only. My stop Richard street never had any proffesional people getting on back in 2010 just a few students, now that's all you see in the A.M. and P.M rush hours. People are slow to catch on, but they are catching on. GV is a 5 min ride on rail to dtjc and 30 min to WTC.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:56
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

user1111 wrote:
Quote:

papadage wrote:
And yet, decades ago, people moved into DTJC, when it was much crappier than many parts of JC that are criticized now. It used to be dirty, crime ridden, with no amenities at all. I am not saying that the other parts of town will gentrify tomorrow, but they will.

Inexpensive rents and lower sale prices, for more square footage, will attract the next wave of gentrification over time.


This is already happening, I run into people on the lightrail or in Bayside Park, Arlington Park that use to be my neighbors dtjc who now moved uptown. I totally understand what Skatee is saying, we had the same problem in my area until we got organized. We have seen great results in the area due to forming a block association and hold the people we vote for accountable. The city pays more attention when you got 60 members on your block demanding services.. many peeps visit me and have said my area almost looks like a gated community because we wont tolerate the old guard... Hang in there man!


This was my point. The city's limited resources are stretched thin. That doesn't make it OK to ignore certain areas or neighborhoods, but it is a fact that they will listen and address more carefully those areas where people are clamoring the most, and you will get there by being organized. A single person (you) or a small group of people (you and your neighbors) is not going to get the same kind of attention as a well organized block association that shows up at the JCPD captain meetings, who collectively project a unified front in matters impacting the block or neighborhood, and who can grab the city's attention with your grievances. As the saying goes, the squeaky wheel gets the oil.

You have no idea how often I am hearing this from the city officials I am in constant contact with

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:53
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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papadage wrote:
And yet, decades ago, people moved into DTJC, when it was much crappier than many parts of JC that are criticized now. It used to be dirty, crime ridden, with no amenities at all. I am not saying that the other parts of town will gentrify tomorrow, but they will.

Inexpensive rents and lower sale prices, for more square footage, will attract the next wave of gentrification over time.


You can get super cheap housing in Detroit. Excellent price per square foot!

People moved to DTJC in spite of all the issues you mentioned because, in addition to cheaper rents, they could still get to work, and entertainment and fun relatively easy. If lower rents were the main drivers of gentrification, all the other areas currently struggling would have gentrified by now. Alas, that is not the case. Yes, more parts will gentrify over time, but the transportation issues are the main issue for so many neighborhoods outside of DTJC. Do you think it is a coincidence that the areas in the immediate vicinity of the light rail are gentrifying at a faster rate than others just a few blocks away? Transportation will continue to drive gentrification in JC. The light rail has been a godsend for some areas, even when just about anyone would tell you it is slow, and crowded at times.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:49
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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papadage wrote:
And yet, decades ago, people moved into DTJC, when it was much crappier than many parts of JC that are criticized now. It used to be dirty, crime ridden, with no amenities at all. I am not saying that the other parts of town will gentrify tomorrow, but they will.

Inexpensive rents and lower sale prices, for more square footage, will attract the next wave of gentrification over time.


This is already happening, I run into people on the lightrail or in Bayside Park, Arlington Park that use to be my neighbors dtjc who now moved uptown. I totally understand what Skatee is saying, we had the same problem in my area until we got organized. We have seen great results in the area due to forming a block association and hold the people we vote for accountable. The city pays more attention when you got 60 members on your block demanding services.. many peeps visit me and have said my area almost looks like a gated community because we wont tolerate the old guard... Hang in there man!


This was my point. The city's limited resources are stretched thin. That doesn't make it OK to ignore certain areas or neighborhoods, but it is a fact that they will listen and address more carefully those areas where people are clamoring the most, and you will get there by being organized. A single person (you) or a small group of people (you and your neighbors) is not going to get the same kind of attention as a well organized block association that shows up at the JCPD captain meetings, who collectively project a unified front in matters impacting the block or neighborhood, and who can grab the city's attention with your grievances. As the saying goes, the squeaky wheel gets the oil.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:44
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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Thanks man, I am trying!

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:31
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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papadage wrote:
And yet, decades ago, people moved into DTJC, when it was much crappier than many parts of JC that are criticized now. It used to be dirty, crime ridden, with no amenities at all. I am not saying that the other parts of town will gentrify tomorrow, but they will.

Inexpensive rents and lower sale prices, for more square footage, will attract the next wave of gentrification over time.


This is already happening, I run into people on the lightrail or in Bayside Park, Arlington Park that use to be my neighbors dtjc who now moved uptown. I totally understand what Skatee is saying, we had the same problem in my area until we got organized. We have seen great results in the area due to forming a block association and hold the people we vote for accountable. The city pays more attention when you got 60 members on your block demanding services.. many peeps visit me and have said my area almost looks like a gated community because we wont tolerate the old guard... Hang in there man!

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:30
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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papadage wrote:
And yet, decades ago, people moved into DTJC, when it was much crappier than many parts of JC that are criticized now. It used to be dirty, crime ridden, with no amenities at all. I am not saying that the other parts of town will gentrify tomorrow, but they will.

Inexpensive rents and lower sale prices, for more square footage, will attract the next wave of gentrification over time.


FALSE. Access to great things will attract the next wave of gentrification. By your theory Patterson, NJ and Gary, IN are the next hot spots because they are cheap.

Skatee, using your example ... it's chicken and egg. If other JC neighborhoods had great access and transportation, a large number of people who vocally care about cleaner streets would have already moved there or would be moving there soon. That's all I'm saying.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:30
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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And yet, decades ago, people moved into DTJC, when it was much crappier than many parts of JC that are criticized now. It used to be dirty, crime ridden, with no amenities at all. I am not saying that the other parts of town will gentrify tomorrow, but they will.

Inexpensive rents and lower sale prices, for more square footage, will attract the next wave of gentrification over time.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:23
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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Agreed to many of your points, but, without city support there is an inherent difficulty in making an area more desirable to eventually achieve maybe not a "critical" mass but a more sizeable one. Would you be more attracted to an area, and forget about amenities, that is clean and fairly well kept or one that is a perpetual shit hole? I understand how long it took downtown to come around, as I said, I witnessed it in part through my passings through the years. Downtown is full and people will look for other parts to settle. The curb appeal of a neighborhood has a lot to do with where that happens to be, and although you may tell me different, I know downtown's aesthetic was not 100% due to solely resident effort. In any event, I'm not trying to pick fights, I'm just fed up. I just find it hard to believe/accept that the plight of an area rests SOLELY, and I repeat SOLELY on the aspects pointed out.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:19
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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skatee123 wrote:
"I agree with you entirely about what it is you want: clean streets and safety, which should be something that everybody in Jersey City should be entitled to. I'm just saying that without 24/7 access to the region's employment and cultural core, your neighborhood will probably not attract a "critical mass" of residents that absolutely demand the streets be clean, and require interesting and plentiful amenities in the neighborhood."

First off, I know plenty of people that make complaints/requests about things in this neighborhood that get little to no response - eventually giving up out of frustration. I on the other had have been beyond vigilant and I am beginning to get results. The point being - I shouldn't have to F'NG BEG everyday for these things and not get them because there isn't a F'NG Path train around the corner! I know what downtown used to be like, I have been in and out of JC quite a bit because of musical interests for the past 17 years or so. I used to pick up a girl who played bass in a band I was in for practice who lived right by Van Vorst Park, and I'd shit my pants waiting for her to come out to the car at night


You are letting your frustration cloud your perception of things. NO ONE is saying that other parts of JC are undeserving of better streets or amenities. It is simply a FACT, that amenities and improvements go hand in hand with the "critical mass" to which tommy_37 has referred. It took DTJC a LONG time to reach that point, and that was in spite of having the PATH around.

Of course, in an ideal world, ever corner of JC gets equal attention from the city administration. In the real world, some places get more attention, because they command more attention, because you have MORE PEOPLE clamoring/demanding that extra attention. It doesn't make them any more important. Just more plentiful.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 19:09
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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"I agree with you entirely about what it is you want: clean streets and safety, which should be something that everybody in Jersey City should be entitled to. I'm just saying that without 24/7 access to the region's employment and cultural core, your neighborhood will probably not attract a "critical mass" of residents that absolutely demand the streets be clean, and require interesting and plentiful amenities in the neighborhood."

First off, I know plenty of people that make complaints/requests about things in this neighborhood that get little to no response - eventually giving up out of frustration. I on the other had have been beyond vigilant and I am beginning to get results. The point being - I shouldn't have to F'NG BEG everyday for these things and not get them because there isn't a F'NG Path train around the corner! I know what downtown used to be like, I have been in and out of JC quite a bit because of musical interests for the past 17 years or so. I used to pick up a girl who played bass in a band I was in for practice who lived right by Van Vorst Park, and I'd shit my pants waiting for her to come out to the car at night

Posted on: 2015/9/11 18:53
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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skatee123 wrote:
Why do I get the impression sometimes that people in certain parts of town don't want to really see any other part get better?


I'm not sure if you're referring to me, but if you are, your impression is inaccurate.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 18:44
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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skatee123 wrote:
So someone like me, who is now a hair over a mile away from JSQ, who decided to stay in this city and pay taxes and plant roots should basically just accept the shitty things to stay that way because I don't make as much money as people in the more "desirable" parts of town and can't live where they are? I am asking basically for the city to keep the streets clean, doesn't seem like a lot to ask or unreasonable


I agree with you entirely about what it is you want: clean streets and safety, which should be something that everybody in Jersey City should be entitled to. I'm just saying that without 24/7 access to the region's employment and cultural core, your neighborhood will probably not attract a "critical mass" of residents that absolutely demand the streets be clean, and require interesting and plentiful amenities in the neighborhood.

It took a really long time for Downtown JC to get that critical mass, and it always had the PATH (3 stations, in fact).

Posted on: 2015/9/11 18:42
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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Why do I get the impression sometimes that people in certain parts of town don't want to really see any other part get better?

Posted on: 2015/9/11 18:41
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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papadage wrote:
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tommyc_37 wrote:
"Years ago", when there was something for everybody in all parts of Jersey City, was a way, way different time - a time when urban living was not generally sought after, at least outside of the Upper East Side types of uber wealthy neighborhoods.

Now, urban living is popular. Highly desirable. It's why Jersey City as a whole has seen a lift, mostly downtown. Access to NYC is the reason. Not just being in Jersey City, but having great access to Manhattan. That is the ticket.

If you look at other non-Downtown parts of Jersey City, some of which have boarded up storefronts, no commercial activity, and dilapidated houses, it's because people who revitalize neighborhoods generally do not want to live in neighborhoods that do not provide access to Manhattan.

Sadly, without the Path lines being extended to other neighborhoods, those neighborhoods will remain as they are. There will be no hyper growth, no huge developments.

Journal Square will explode. The Heights will remain stable with some growth. Everything else will remain as is or show marginal improvements.

In Jersey City, it will always be a tale of two cities, unless the Path is extended to other neighborhoods. Until then, the discrepancy between Downtown and other JC neighborhoods will only continue to grow, not shrink. It is an entirely different audience.


I disagree.

Look how far people commute from deep into Queens and Brooklyn, with multiple transfers. Any part of JC is a quicker commute than many of those areas. Downtown, then the Square, then the Heights will appreciate faster, in that order, but the rest of JC will do so in turn. Greenville has Light Rail and bus access to the PATH, and with CitiBike, it's not that bad either on nice days.


We can agree to disagree. Those far out areas of Brooklyn and Queens are not really gentrified. They have not changed in 20 years, at least very noticeably.

That being said, those far out Brooklyn/Queens have changed a little and will change at a faster rate than non-PATH areas of JC because it's the MTA Subway, and it provides 24 hour access to their neighborhood from Manhattan, with one swipe of a Metrocard rather than separate systems altogether. This cannot be said for places in JC where people have to take a bus or a light rail to get to the 24-hour PATH. Not only is it a connection (or two), but it's not 24 hours, and it's an additional cost and an additional system.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 18:36
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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tommyc_37 wrote:
"Years ago", when there was something for everybody in all parts of Jersey City, was a way, way different time - a time when urban living was not generally sought after, at least outside of the Upper East Side types of uber wealthy neighborhoods.

Now, urban living is popular. Highly desirable. It's why Jersey City as a whole has seen a lift, mostly downtown. Access to NYC is the reason. Not just being in Jersey City, but having great access to Manhattan. That is the ticket.

If you look at other non-Downtown parts of Jersey City, some of which have boarded up storefronts, no commercial activity, and dilapidated houses, it's because people who revitalize neighborhoods generally do not want to live in neighborhoods that do not provide access to Manhattan.

Sadly, without the Path lines being extended to other neighborhoods, those neighborhoods will remain as they are. There will be no hyper growth, no huge developments.

Journal Square will explode. The Heights will remain stable with some growth. Everything else will remain as is or show marginal improvements.

In Jersey City, it will always be a tale of two cities, unless the Path is extended to other neighborhoods. Until then, the discrepancy between Downtown and other JC neighborhoods will only continue to grow, not shrink. It is an entirely different audience.


I disagree.

Look how far people commute from deep into Queens and Brooklyn, with multiple transfers. Any part of JC is a quicker commute than many of those areas. Downtown, then the Square, then the Heights will appreciate faster, in that order, but the rest of JC will do so in turn. Greenville has Light Rail and bus access to the PATH, and with CitiBike, it's not that bad either on nice days.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 18:31
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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So someone like me, who is now a hair over a mile away from JSQ, who decided to stay in this city and pay taxes and plant roots should basically just accept the shitty things to stay that way because I don't make as much money as people in the more "desirable" parts of town and can't live where they are? I am asking basically for the city to keep the streets clean, doesn't seem like a lot to ask or unreasonable

Posted on: 2015/9/11 18:01
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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"Years ago", when there was something for everybody in all parts of Jersey City, was a way, way different time - a time when urban living was not generally sought after, at least outside of the Upper East Side types of uber wealthy neighborhoods.

Now, urban living is popular. Highly desirable. It's why Jersey City as a whole has seen a lift, mostly downtown. Access to NYC is the reason. Not just being in Jersey City, but having great access to Manhattan. That is the ticket.

If you look at other non-Downtown parts of Jersey City, some of which have boarded up storefronts, no commercial activity, and dilapidated houses, it's because people who revitalize neighborhoods generally do not want to live in neighborhoods that do not provide access to Manhattan.

Sadly, without the Path lines being extended to other neighborhoods, those neighborhoods will remain as they are. There will be no hyper growth, no huge developments.

Journal Square will explode. The Heights will remain stable with some growth. Everything else will remain as is or show marginal improvements.

In Jersey City, it will always be a tale of two cities, unless the Path is extended to other neighborhoods. Until then, the discrepancy between Downtown and other JC neighborhoods will only continue to grow, not shrink. It is an entirely different audience.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 17:54
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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PS - re-reading my post I realize how poorly it was written. I am at work and probably be spending the time here I am on this board, but reading through this thread evoked a deep emotional response considering the b.s. I have been dealing with on this very matter so it was more a spewing than a compostion

Posted on: 2015/9/11 17:47
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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Ok, I may speak for a small minority of people but that does not invalidate the points I am about to make. Me, my wife, and my daughter moved from downton a year and a half ago. We had lived in a small apartment on 5th Street between Monmouth and Coles and with my daughter getting bigger we knew we had to find another place. Me and my wife both work in the arts, and we are by no means people of wealth, nor are we destitute. So we decided, hey, we both work in NYC, staying here in JC is the most cost effective place to stay in terms of transportation costs, so let's look for a place to buy. Downtown was obviously out of the question, so the heights and the Westside became our focus. Originally we looked at condos, but when we realized making that happen because of owner occupancy rules and the amount for a down payment where obstacles, we ended up looking at houses. We ended up finding a place off Duncan near Lincoln Park. Ever since we have been there I have done whatever I could to make my surroundings better. That includes cleaning not only my street but most of Duncan between Westside and Rt. 1. By myself it is a near impossible task to keep up with, and I beg city officials daily for help, which comes at the pace of a three legged turtle. My point in all of this is this - I am not what is perceived to be the typical inhabitant of this neighborhood as described by previous posters, and I know many more who are not either that have come to this part of town. These areas NEED the city's attention. No one will ever want to start occupying an area if it is continually treated like some disfigured stepchild that you hide in the attic. I never truly realized how different life in downtown and other spots truly was until I actually lived here, and now that I am a resident of this neighborhood I am beyond pissed and frustrated that I can't get responses to the requests I make. To simply say, these parts of town are filled with this type of person or that type and they aren't worth attending to or servicing is a complete horesh@t answer that I will not idly stand by and accept

Posted on: 2015/9/11 17:39
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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Lima17 wrote:
"Years ago, Jersey City was thriving and flourishing because the city had something for everybody, not just Downtown. "

How many years ago was this?


At least 30 years ago... maybe much more. In the 80s, things were so bad that brownstones all over downtown could be had for next to nothing (heck, even 20 years ago you could still snag one for a fraction of what they command today).

For those who don't know, the infamous "Cops" show filmed a bunch of episodes right here in Jersey City in the early 90's. Pretty funny watching johns getting snared in prostitution stake outs over on Communipaw, not too far from where the Crown Chicken is located.

Posted on: 2015/9/11 17:06
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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"Years ago, Jersey City was thriving and flourishing because the city had something for everybody, not just Downtown. "

How many years ago was this?

Posted on: 2015/9/11 15:20
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Re: A sign of the times for 'two cities' | Morgan
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In a column in The Jersey Journal by Earl Morgan about how Jersey City is two cities, he points out that a railroad trestle Downtown Jersey City was specifically hand -painted "Welcome to Downtown." The sign should really read, "Welcome to the Free-Loading Developers Section of Jersey City."

I will say this, the road to the statehouse in New Jersey for governor for Mr. Fulop starts in Jersey City. Earl mentions that Fulop is hobnobbing Downtown with new store owners, enhancing the idea that this section is a hip place to live.

Many people feel he should be hobnobbing with all residents who are just plain fed up with all the crime in their area and the lack of commercial development along the main streets of their communities. There is the feeling they are the recipients of social programs not wanted in places like Downtown. Many hard working African-American citizens live in these crime invested areas and are afraid to come of their houses.

These same residents could have a major impact on the outcome should Fulop run for governor. One thing the rich freeloading developers cannot buy is votes. Since Mr. Fulop and his cronies are awarding generous abatements to the freeloaders, he might as well award new abatements to developers who will build in other areas of Jersey City, like West Side, Ocean, and Monticello avenues and many other streets hit hard with crime, instead of having these freeloaders build rich condos for Downtown yuppies. They really need to invest in quality stores like WalMart, ShopRite or Target in the forgotten areas of the city. Earl Morgan makes sense.

Years ago, Jersey City was thriving and flourishing because the city had something for everybody, not just Downtown. Years ago, we had Canton Restaurant, Five Corners Bakery, Woolworth's, Myer's Ice Cream, Jules and Ilventos restaurants, Nedick's, Liss Drugs, and Schneider's Bakery, Roosevelt Stadium, movie theaters and the list goes on.

Steve Full-of-It needs to find developers who are willing to build with retail in mind and not just limiting his development to high-end residential condos.

Those who voted Fulop into office are ready to vote against him in the future because they are just plain "Fed Up."

http://www.nj.com/opinion/index.ssf/2 ... _letter.html#incart_river

KEVIN C. STANLEY
Jersey City

Posted on: 2015/9/11 11:45
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