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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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The main difference between 100 years ago and now is how that population lived. A century ago, single family brownstones might have had a family with half a dozen family members and live in domestic servants. Even if the breadwinner was a worker commuting to Manhattan, most likely one house generated one commuter.

Today, many brownstones are broken up into three or four smaller households, generating at least one commuter but sometimes more per household. So while fewer people are living in the city now, many more commuters are being generated on each lot.



Current weekday ridership: 259,000
1949 estimate: 200,000
1947 estimate: 130,000
1920 estimate: 140,000




http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive/ ... 77B93CBA8178AD85F4D8485F9

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive- ... 28DDDA80994DC405B808EF1D3

Posted on: 2012/2/6 3:40
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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neverleft wrote:
People do not panic! We will all survive the coming population increase. The good people of JC survived the populations of the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s we didn’t starve to death , we weren’t crushed on Path trains. We were all able to get to our work and school destinations on time and grab something to eat at night. There were plenty of public services to go around, park space, recreation, and entertainment. I will admit Journal Square in the 70’s was really congested at rush hour with people hitting the Path and buses to Newark and “the big apple” but that’s life. (and just think people were real stinky back then..no fancy body washes or lotions especially for men
(Old timers correct me if I am wrong)

Comparing the middle part of the 20th century to now is not really fair. Back then most woman stayed home, only a percentage of the J.C. working population used the PATH, plus it was usually only crowded during the rush hour. Today it seems that a majority of the passengers live within walking distance of the J.C. PATH stations and that was their main reason for moving near them. Back then the PATH just happened to be in the background of the neighborhood. It's use has gone tenfold since.

Posted on: 2012/2/6 2:10
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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Extend the L train to Hoboken. That would be a lot cheaper than bringing the 7 train to Hoboken.

Relative to some other major world cities, NYC (as well as NY state and NJ) have seriously underinvested in their infrastructure.

Posted on: 2012/2/6 0:31
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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People do not panic! We will all survive the coming population increase. The good people of JC survived the populations of the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s we didn’t starve to death , we weren’t crushed on Path trains. We were all able to get to our work and school destinations on time and grab something to eat at night. There were plenty of public services to go around, park space, recreation, and entertainment. I will admit Journal Square in the 70’s was really congested at rush hour with people hitting the Path and buses to Newark and “the big apple” but that’s life. (and just think people were real stinky back then..no fancy body washes or lotions especially for men)

Check out that decrease from 1970 to 1980..why did they all leave me? (was my Ivory soap not strong enough?)

Historical JC populations

Census.... Pop...... %±

1910..... 267,779..... 29.7%
1920..... 298,103..... 11.3%
1930..... 316,715..... 6.2%
1940..... 301,173..... −4.9%
1950..... 299,017..... −0.7%
1960..... 276,101..... −7.7%
1970..... 260,350..... −5.7%
1980..... 223,532..... −14.1%
1990..... 228,537..... 2.2%
2000..... 240,055..... 5.0%
2010..... 247,597..... 3.1%


(old timers correct me if I am wrong)

Posted on: 2012/2/5 21:43
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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Well, the point of the PATH's signal project is to increase capacity. Once finished, they are supposed to be able to run trains closer to each other. Just a few more years...


"The PATH rail system will receive a nearly $400 million signal-system upgrade, increasing potential rail capacity on the line 20 percent by 2014, officials said today." (Jersey Journal Oct 17, 2007)

"The signal project, eventually projected to cost $580 million and be completed in 2017, is part of a $3.3 billion plan to modernize the entire PATH system over the next 10 years." October 23, 2009, Star Ledger

Posted on: 2012/2/5 18:28
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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We need to attract more jobs in jersey city so that more people can live and work here.

Posted on: 2012/2/5 14:45
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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Well, the point of the PATH's signal project is to increase capacity. Once finished, they are supposed to be able to run trains closer to each other. Just a few more years...

Posted on: 2012/2/5 13:48
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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The NJ transit 126 bus goes from Hamilton park into the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Manhattan. Robin.

And from JSQ the #125 runs along Kennedy Blvd. in the Heights up to 32nd. St. in Union City on it's way to the Lincoln Tunnel into Manhattan.

Posted on: 2012/2/5 11:19
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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are you new here?jeez

Posted on: 2012/2/5 10:59
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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How about the PATH increase the service by the same percentage they increase the fares...65% fare increase on monthly cards should equal a 65% increase in service...

Hell..I'd even take a 25% increase in service.

Posted on: 2012/2/5 5:20
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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The NJ transit 126 bus goes from Hamilton park into the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Manhattan.

Robin.

Posted on: 2012/2/5 4:50
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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there are buses from Journal Square that run along Kennedy and Palisade Avenue into Port Authority so some of those people could more of those buses, and if there really is demand as opposed to just inconvenience, then maybe nj transit might add buses.

Posted on: 2012/2/5 4:25
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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Where in downtown JC can you catch a bus that will take you into Manhattan?

Posted on: 2012/2/5 1:40
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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well, there's the Ferry; there are buses into Manhattan. Maybe some people will leave a liitle earlier/later. Maybe they should extend the 7 train to Hoboken or build the rail tunnel into Manhattan.

Posted on: 2012/2/5 1:37
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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The PATH is already at 120% capacity at rush hour, prob 80-90% non rush hour

Posted on: 2012/2/4 17:35
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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How will the PATH and the Downtown section sustain this population increase ? Hopefully this will enhance the local businesses and add more as well.


The PATH won't. But the businesses will probably thrive.

Posted on: 2012/2/4 1:04
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Re: NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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How will the PATH and the Downtown section sustain this population increase ? Hopefully this will enhance the local businesses and add more as well.

Posted on: 2012/2/3 16:17
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NYTIMES: Feeding the Rental Appetite -- New rentals include the 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City
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Feeding the Rental Appetite

New rentals in Hudson County include the 140-unit Willow14 in Hoboken.
New York Times
By ANTOINETTE MARTIN
Published: February 2, 2012

HUDSON COUNTY indisputably rules the rental housing market in New Jersey: It has the largest supply of Class A units — around 13,000, according to industry experts — and commands the highest average rental rates of any part of the state. This year and next, that rental kingdom is projected to grow rapidly.

The New York Times Real Estate App
A recently updated, free iPhone app offering in-depth property search tools and mobile features to help you navigate the real estate market.

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The 422-unit 18 Park in Jersey City.
Developers are already at work on, or have recently announced, projects that will add several thousand more units in waterfront communities like Hoboken, Jersey City and Weehawken, and hundreds of other units elsewhere.

Hudson County is one part of the state where builders “can still get the economics to work” in their favor, said David Barry, the president of the Ironstate Development Company in Hoboken.

“You have to add in the fact that multifamily rentals seem to be the only thing for which builders can get a construction loan from lenders these days,” Mr. Barry added, noting that this factor was keeping the rental development market “very warm, if not hot.”

Rents increased as much as 10 percent at some waterfront buildings in 2011, said Jose R. Cruz, a director of the real estate finance company Holliday Fenoglio Fowler. Mr. Cruz specializes in brokering apartment building sales for investors. He said rental rates had risen 7 to 8 percent in Hudson County as a whole over the last 12 months. The average monthly rent in the county was more than $2,600 for the first time in many recent market reports.

Meanwhile, vacancy rates have decreased steadily since early last year, when the opening of the 524-unit Monaco Towers in Jersey City caused an “artificial” spike to 7 percent, Mr. Cruz said. Most market reports put it at 3 to 4 percent, and declining.

Several companies forced to the sidelines by the recession are at work on projects. In Jersey City, the Manhattan Building Company has almost half finished a 20-story tower near the Holland Tunnel that will have two- and three-bedroom family-size units, and Fields Development is working on a 131-unit luxury rental with studios, one- and two-bedrooms in the Paulus Hook neighborhood. In Hoboken, the Advance Realty Group is building a 140-unit rental called Willow14, scheduled for completion early next year.

In addition, two longtime commercial office space developers announced plans in December to move into the residential rentals arena in Hudson County, starting with waterfront complexes.

One of them, the Mack-Cali Realty Corporation, said it would join with Ironstate to put up 500 units and a parking garage beside its Harborside Financial Center office complex in Jersey City. The parking garage comes first, and construction will start early next year.

The other, Hartz Mountain Industries, plans to develop a 589-unit complex called the Estuary at Lincoln Harbor in Weehawken, with the Roseland Property Company. Work is starting immediately, and Hartz said it hoped to begin leasing at the first of three buildings by the end of next year. The company also acquired 99 Hudson Street in downtown Jersey City for $35 million, with the intention of having it rezoned to residential from commercial.

Carl Goldberg, the managing partner of Roseland, said the Weehawken complex would have an array of amenities similar to those at the Monaco: a rooftop deck and pool, a hot tub, a fitness room, and a children’s playroom and Wii game center.

Hudson County’s waterfront rental market is “totally connected” to Manhattan’s, Mr. Barry said. And Mr. Goldberg agreed, noting that an integral reason the rental market is heated in Hudson County is because it is boiling in New York — and at much higher prices. “The lifestyle differences in New Jersey are seen by many renters as advantages for which they pay less,” Mr. Goldberg added. “They get rewarded twice in one location selection.”

Last year Mr. Barry’s company opened a 275-unit building in a nonwaterfront location, taking the lead in rental development in Harrison’s former industrial district, on a site next to a PATH station and close to the Red Bulls soccer stadium. Leasing there has also been brisk, and Mr. Barry said the building would probably be entirely occupied within the next six months.

This year Ironstate will concentrate on construction of a hotel at the site, known as Harrison Station. Heller Industrial Parks — another company making its first foray into residential construction — is to begin demolition of vacant warehouse structures across the street from the hotel site this month, said Jeffrey J. Milanaik, Heller’s president.

It plans to open its first 125-unit residential building by the fall of 2013. Both Heller and Ironstate have long-term plans to work on a mixed-use community at Harrison Station. Ironstate’s next rental project this year, however, will be in Jersey City. Construction is to start this spring in partnership with the Kushner Real Estate Group on a 422-unit building close to 225 Grand, a rental that Mr. Barry’s company built two years ago and has fully leased. The building, to be known as 18 Park, should come online in the fall of 2013, he said.

Also in Jersey City, the LeFrak Organization recently broke ground on its 16th building at the Newport megaproject, which already has 12 rental buildings with 4,100 units. The building, to be called the Laguna, will have one- and two-bedroom apartments and is to open in January 2013.

In West New York, at the Port Imperial master-planned project, Roseland began work last fall on a 316-unit rental; it is set to open late next year.

Posted on: 2012/2/3 16:11
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