Register now !    Login  
Main Menu
Who's Online
32 user(s) are online (21 user(s) are browsing Message Forum)

Members: 0
Guests: 32

more...


Forum Index


Board index » All Posts (Dolomiti)




Re: New CCTV cameras being installed in Jersey City
#1
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

iGreg wrote:
Nice 1

High res digital modern cameras that will thwart crime in the problem areas or at least get clear images of the savages who commit them.

Next will be allowing stop and frisk policies to keep that area safe - keeping the decent folk who live there some sense of security.

All good in the Da Hood.....

#fornow

Erm.... Yeah... No.

The current trend is away from stop & frisk, since it generated a massive lawsuit and loss in NYC.

Also, S&F is not a reason to either adopt or reject police cameras. The two are independent, and there is no slippery slope.

Posted on: 1/20 15:34
Top


Re: Roberto Clemente Field Just Sold?
#2
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

edg2103 wrote:
Quote:

OneSkirt wrote:
I suggest we all...
TAKE THE SURVEY HERE: https://goo.gl/forms/WTzyEUO8k71koVcw2

consider what this huge density jump will do to traffic - on roads, in public transit, etc.


A dirty little secret about the PATH train is that they run service at precisely the frequency that makes sure it is packed NO MATTER how many riders there are...I've seen trains packed at 11am, when the ridership volume is about 1/3 of what it is at rush hour. Why?

I've never seen a packed train at 11am on a weekday. And I've taken LOTS of non-rush-hour trains.

On weekdays, rains run every 10 minutes from 10AM to 5PM. DEVIOUS!!!

And yes, it does make sense to run fewer trains when there are fewer riders. Every transit system does that, because it reduces strain on the system and keeps costs down.


Quote:
The only true bottleneck is at rush hour. But the PA's latest capital plan calls for buying more cars now that the new signal system has been installed. That should increase frequency/capacity about 18% starting in 2018. Guess what? They never would've bought the cars to increase rush hour frequency if ridership hadn't increased.

Uh... Okay...

You do understand that a rail line is not going to buy extra cars just to have extra cars, right...?


Quote:
Capacity can further be increased about 50% in the future by accomodating 10-car trains and cars with open gangways. These aren't insanely expensive moves....

10 car trains on all lines requires extending the Harrison Station. That's already in progress, and is not cheap.

Removing gangways will help, but it's not going to increase capacity by 25%. Since that requires buying all new cars, that is not cheap either.

Feasible yes. Cheap no.


Quote:
Even if we leveled half of downtown into a giant parking lot (which many people here would love), the PATH would STILL be packed, because they'd just reduce service frequency to compensate.

If you mean that they aren't going to run enough cars for everyone to have a seat during rush hour? Then you're correct.

They are not going to run the system on max, 24/7, so you can get somewhere 5 minutes faster in the middle of the day.

In fact, the ideal would be to have headroom in capacity, so that they can handle future increases.

Further, it's not clear they will reduce frequency during the day. They just might send 6- and 7- and 8-car trains during the day, and maintain 10 minute intervals, as they do now.

Keep in mind they are also planning to extend the PATH to Newark Airport. Making people wait 20 minutes for the train in mid-day, when they're going to the airport? THAT is not going to work.

Posted on: 1/20 15:30
Top


Re: Jersey City mayor-elect orders end to citywide reval
#3
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Azul_the_Cat wrote:
When we live in one of the states with the highest taxes in the nation, I doubt people want to cough up another 1% or even .5%, unless the increase is offset by a reduction somewhere else.

just my $0.02

Meh... No one likes paying taxes.

And again, since this is revenue neutral, in order for one person's tax bill to go up, another person's tax bill has to go down. This is about fairness, not about socking people for higher taxes.

Posted on: 1/13 10:01
Top


Re: Jersey City mayor-elect orders end to citywide reval
#4
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Azul_the_Cat wrote:
It still amazes me that people thought the taxes they were paying on some of these DTJC properties was correct....

I don' think most people have any clue how real estate taxes are calculated. They just look at the sheet, see "ok that's the tax," and hate paying no matter what the amount.

Posted on: 1/13 9:59
Top


Re: USA added to list of persecuted Christians
#5
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
Alex C.
Recently Ellen DeGeneres disinvited a guest to her show because the woman who is a preacher talked about homosexuality in her church. Ellen is on public airwaves in which her show lease from the government with renewals. That was a violation. You are ignoring the crimes of the liberals.

Again, wrong.

Being a guest on Ellen's show is not protected. That aspect of her show is not open to the public. It's invite only, it's got a long history of exclusivity, and it's expressive.

What she can't do is bar people from the audience on the basis of their race, class, gender, religion or sexual orientation. That part is open to the public, and anyone can attend.

Leasing air from the government has absolutely nothing to do with whom Ellen can invite on her show. They are already subject to FCC rules, which don't require hosts to invite certain types of guests.

I.e. if your claim was correct, then I could barge into Fox News and demand to be a guest on Bill O'Reilly's show. Not only is such behavior not protected, it's not even a good idea.

It may be impolite or even unethical to disinvite someone based on their religious views, but it certainly is not a violation of civil rights laws.

Posted on: 1/11 22:16
Top


Re: USA added to list of persecuted Christians
#6
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
Florist arrangements or creating a wedding cake is part of an art form.

No, it isn't.

It's a business that operates as a public accommodation. Making cakes is a commercial service, not an expressive act. When the baker writes "Congrats Tim and Jim on their wedding," that is no more an expressive act than someone walking into Kinko's and using their photocopiers to print hundreds of flyers.

Something similar happened with the Elane Photography case. The photographer refused to photograph a wedding specifically because of the gender and sexual orientation of the participants (a gay couple). The New Mexico court ruled that because Elane Photography advertised its services directly to the public, it was operating as a public accommodation. It rejected the idea that expressive professions were exempt from the civil rights laws.


Quote:
How many artists refused to participate in Trump’s inauguration? Shouldn’t Trump sue because those artists discriminated against him?

lol

Nope. Those artists do not operate as public accommodations. Civil rights laws do not apply.


Quote:
He is in an unique classification as president so he has a case.

Not even close.

In addition to the above issue: "Elected official" is not a protected classification. Maybe you could get away with that in California, where civil rights laws have been interpreted broadly. But that's not going to fly in most US states.


Quote:
An artist also said on tv that he refused to design Mrs. Trump dress, isn't that another discrimination case?

Probably not.

You'd have to make the case that the designer operates as a public accommodation. If they do not advertise haute couture or custom design services to the public, or have a history of being exclusive, then you aren't likely to prove in court that they operate as a public accommodation.

E.g. Andre Leon Talley doesn't operate as a public accommodation. He doesn't advertise his services as a stylist, he has a history of exclusivity, he doesn't have a storefront open to the public. Same for John Wu's services as a designer.

I realize civil rights law is complex (and what I'm saying just scratches the surface), but next time it might help to know what you're talking about before making such suggestions.

Posted on: 1/11 22:11
Top


Re: USA added to list of persecuted Christians
#7
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
One reason why the USA is on this list. Did same sex activists say same sex marriage would not harm anyone?

Requiring businesses to obey civil rights laws does not qualify as a type of harm.

If that was the case, then requiring businesses to serve blacks would also qualify as "harm." (And yes, many people did cite religious beliefs to justify segregation.)

Posted on: 1/11 12:07
Top


Re: 25 miles up the Hudson River -- the Indian Point nuclear power plant will be shut down.
#8
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

WhoElseCouldIBe wrote:
Quote:

jerseymom wrote:
Quote:

WhoElseCouldIBe wrote:
Oh good, now we can burn more fossil fuels.


Too many accidents at this facility - plus they built it on a major earthquake fault. I'm glad it's closing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Point_Energy_Center


Closing it before building a replacement facility?

Hope you like burning a lot more fossil fuel and paying more for energy.

Actually, it looks like most of it will be replaced with increased transmission efficiency, hydro, and other sustainable energy sources.

NY State already has a target to generate 50% of its energy from sustainable sources. Closing Indian Point is not likely to thwart that goal.

Further, citing the potential benefits of nuclear doesn't make the problems of Indian Point go away.

It's too close to one of the most populated cities in the world; it's had lots of small leaks of radioactive isotopes into the Hudson; the cooling system kills fish in the Hudson; it turns out to be sited on top of a fault line.

While no one likes the idea of having a nuclear plant for a neighbor, if we really want another nuclear power plant, it ought to be somewhere else.

Posted on: 1/10 10:55
Top


Re: USA added to list of persecuted Christians
#9
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
Luckily, the rules in the Vatican has changed, gay men cannot enter the seminary to become priests.

Huh? When were gay men ever allowed to become priests?

And you do know that the problem was not limited to same-sex abuse?

That being said, the real problem was that the RCC chose to protect priests, rather than protect communities. That is less likely to happen today than ~15 years ago.


Quote:
Still the USA does deserves this inclusion.

For what, exactly?

• The report cites alleged anti-Christian bias in the media. Given that 70% of Americans are Christian, that is obviously more hyper-sensitivity than anything else.

• It cites several examples of state and federal governments enforcing the separation of church and state. That is hardly as bad as Saudi Arabia arresting Christians for proselytization.

• It says that Americans voluntarily eschewing organized religion is somehow anti-Christian.

• It chides "court decisions" for basically not going how this organization wants. *cough* Obergefell

Sorry, but this is a bunch of BS, and does not serve the organization's mission. When it comes to evaluations of persecution, I'll stick to Amnesty International, kthx.


Posted on: 1/10 10:44
Top


Re: Seth Boyden Housing Project Complex to Become PATH Station Village
#10
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

DanL wrote:

this sounds like a sop in attempts to justify the expense of extending the PATH to Newark Airport. there is no shortage of increasing PATH ridership and only two tunnels under the north river.

One-seat train from Manhattan and JC to EWR sounds like a big win to me. An expensive one, but still a win.

I also doubt there is a massive rush of planes arriving at 8:00 AM weekdays, and departing at 6:00 PM weekdays and 12:00 AM weekends. More likely is that there will be better utilization of off-hour trains, which are not particularly crowded.

Posted on: 1/6 10:07
Top


Re: Car stolen from front of my house on York St.
#11
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

Dolomiti wrote:
Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

Dolomiti wrote:
I can also say is that as long as people are reporting property crimes, they go into COMPSTAT, which AFAIK shows no indication of a major increase in property crimes.


Do you have a link for COMPSTAT property crime figures? The COMPSTAT link on the JCPD website only shows serious crimes. Or, did I miss something?

Here's a typical monthly COMPSTAT report. It includes robberies, broken down by method (armed, unarmed); aggravated assault, including unarmed; burglary, forced and unforced entries; and motor vehicle theft, including attempts.

http://www.njjcpd.org/sites/default/files/Sept2016.pdf

I don't know which category includes breaking into a car to steal a GPS or stereo. I think that qualifies as "burglary." Unsuccessful attempts might not be included in COMPSTAT.


Thanks. That's one of the same reports I was perusing earlier. It is not at all clear (to me, at least) how property crimes fit into any of those categories (let's say, for example, graffiti, or a broken window as part of a malicious act, such as a bottle flung into someone's home) so I wasn't sure if those were tallied elsewhere. It is an interesting stat for which I would like to see hard numbers. Surely it is tallied somewhere, as other sites seem to publish figures for that, such as the city-data site.


I'm afraid that's beyond my knowledge. I believe COMPSTAT's categories is limited by the software, as NYC uses the same ones.

FWIW, I haven't seen any evidence of rising vandalism in DTJC.

Posted on: 1/3 16:30
Top


Re: Car stolen from front of my house on York St.
#12
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

yorkster wrote:
As a side note, any one know where I can find information of the shooting incident? I did a quick Google search but did not find anything.

I'd start with http://www.nj.com/hudson/

If they tell you what city it's in, maybe the police blotter will say something.

If it were me, I think I'd rather not know.

I'd check with the insurance company, and see what's involved in getting them to classify it as a total loss. Hopefully they'll work with you on it.

Posted on: 1/3 16:13
Top


Re: Car stolen from front of my house on York St.
#13
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

Dolomiti wrote:
I can also say is that as long as people are reporting property crimes, they go into COMPSTAT, which AFAIK shows no indication of a major increase in property crimes.


Do you have a link for COMPSTAT property crime figures? The COMPSTAT link on the JCPD website only shows serious crimes. Or, did I miss something?

Here's a typical monthly COMPSTAT report. It includes robberies, broken down by method (armed, unarmed); aggravated assault, including unarmed; burglary, forced and unforced entries; and motor vehicle theft, including attempts.

http://www.njjcpd.org/sites/default/files/Sept2016.pdf

I don't know which category includes breaking into a car to steal a GPS or stereo. I think that qualifies as "burglary." Unsuccessful attempts might not be included in COMPSTAT.

Posted on: 1/3 13:30
Top


Re: Car stolen from front of my house on York St.
#14
Home away from home
Home away from home


JadedJC wrote:
Quote:
I'm not going to argue numbers with you. To anybody who has been the victim of a break-in (I was in the past year), stats won't change your personal perception of something you've experienced firsthand.

In other words: "Don't bother me with the facts!"

It makes sense that on a personal level, after being victimized by crime, you won't feel safe.

However, it is completely irrational to say that because you personally were the victim of crime, that "JC is experiencing a crime wave." If anything, you have an obligation to realize that your unfortunate experience is biasing your perceptions.


Quote:
It's made worse by my experience - and that of others - that the JCPD doesn't give a shit and will expend zero effort to investigate property crimes.

I can't say anything about JCPD's conduct, except that I doubt it's changed over the past ~10 years, during which time property crimes have substantially dropped.

I can also say is that as long as people are reporting property crimes, they go into COMPSTAT, which AFAIK shows no indication of a major increase in property crimes.

Posted on: 1/3 12:08
Top


Re: Worthy causes
#15
Home away from home
Home away from home



Posted on: 1/2 19:49
Top


Re: Car stolen from front of my house on York St.
#16
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

heights wrote:
Time to be less politically correct and more on guard. If something looks suspicious act on those senses...if they still exist.

Unless I'm reading it wrong, the OP's car got robbed in the middle of the night. Was he or she supposed to be suspicious while sleeping?

Are we supposed to call the police because we see someone with dark skin wandering around the neighborhood?

Should we only call the police if the person smashing the car window has dark skin?

Crime rates have dropped almost every year since at least 2002, if not earlier. Should the reductions in crime generate more fear of crime? You do realize that's kind of backwards, yes?


Quote:
Less rental properties and absentee landlords would assist in this situation as well.

Uh, no. It won't make any difference whatsoever.

Home owners don't stay up until 6AM, sitting on their stoop with a shotgun in their arms, making sure no one steals their car. An occupant is an occupant, a resident is a resident.

I have never seen the tiniest scrap of data that correlates crime rates and home ownership rates. Where do you get ideas like that?

Posted on: 1/2 19:48
Top


Re: Car stolen from front of my house on York St.
#17
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

JadedJC wrote:
I've been in JC 14 years now, and property crime seems to be much worse downtown than I've ever seen it.

It isn't. It's not even close.

Burglaries have dropped in half since 2002. Thefts are down by 25%, auto thefts by about 66%, robberies are less than half their peak in 2005.

http://www.city-data.com/crime/crime-Jersey-City-New-Jersey.html


Quote:
JCPD has warned of a surge in bicycle thefts this past year.

OK, and...? It's not like bike theft is a new crime.


Quote:
Anecdotally, I'm hearing of more people experiencing burglaries and break-ins.

Anecdotes are completely meaningless when it comes to crime.

They don't give you objective numbers, they don't properly identify trends, and perceptions of crime are way out of whack with the reality.

Posted on: 1/2 19:40
Top


Re: Car stolen from front of my house on York St.
#18
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Personally, I think this incident speaks volumes about two things of concern:
- much of DTJC has been lulled into a false sense of security....

Or, crime rates are in fact significantly lower than in the past.

Auto thefts in JC
2002: 2296
2013: 738
2016 through September: 390

Although I concur DTJC is far from crime-free, people feel more safe because... Jersey City IS more safe.


Quote:
- I'm afraid we are witnessing the beginning of an economic downturn based in the recent uptick in petty crime and the increasing number of people showing up at local soup kitchens.

1) Keeping in mind that I haven't pored over the COMPSTAT figures, I don't see any indication that there is a significant increase in crime in JC in 2016.

2) I haven't seen any indication of an impending economic downturn, either national, or regional, or local.

3) There is no correlation between economic downturns, and either petty crime or soup kitchen utilization. They certainly don't act as leading indicators.

See for yourself. Let me know which type of crime, in your opinion, forecast -- or increased because of -- the 2008 recession.
http://www.city-data.com/crime/crime-Jersey-City-New-Jersey.html

Posted on: 1/2 19:35
Top


Re: Tractor trailer crashes into gazebo in Hamilton Park
#19
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

AlexC wrote:
still, even though he drove slowly, there might be someone who got run over?

At 10pm, he could have run someone over.


Quote:
can we make this political, like every stupid thread in JCList?

Pass

However, if it is true that other drivers have gone over the curb and directly into the park, then it might not be a bad idea to put in a removable bollard or two.

Posted on: 12/11 20:26
Top


Re: Tractor trailer crashes into gazebo in Hamilton Park
#20
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

HamSandwichPark wrote:
Driver said he did it on purpose. Wtf???

People say crazy things when they, uh, do crazy things ;)

I don't recall hearing anything about vehicles driving straight into the park, though.

Posted on: 12/9 18:52
Top


Re: Buy this beauty - and pray the reval never happens!
#21
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

mfadam wrote:
well if 2% is the going rate for JC property taxes and some chump hits their $3mm ask, they're looking at a cool $60K a year in taxes.

My understanding is that the reval will be revenue-neutral; the idea is to keep the same total revenues, but distribute it more fairly based on current value.

So that home will certainly pay far more in taxes, and a new owner might get sticker shock when the new tax bill comes, but it's not going to be $60k per year.

Posted on: 12/8 21:55
Top


Re: Buy this beauty - and pray the reval never happens!
#22
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

tern wrote:
Property taxes are deductible...for now.

One of Trumps numerous and ever shifting plans and promises is do eliminate that.

Riiiiiiiiiiight

To be a bit more specific: One plan is to dramatically increase the standard deductible to $15k single / $30k joint filers. At that point, many people won't need to itemize deductions, such as the one for property taxes.

Upper income earners will also in theory face a lower tax bracket, and have stricter limits on deductions. Mnuchin indicated it would target a revenue-neutral result. This should happen shortly after Hell freezes over.

Keep in mind that in the unlikely event that the property tax deduction is killed outright, property values will likely drop around 10-12% as well.

Posted on: 12/8 16:46
Top


Re: Buy this beauty - and pray the reval never happens!
#23
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

manu wrote:
Getting ready for the reval myself, I was wondering: are 'property tax' tax deductable?

Yes.

Plus, the reval will be revenue-neutral... which is why it did not destroy property values in Hoboken, or spark a huge wave of sales by older/longer-term residents.

Fears of the effects are exaggerated by the usual suspects, i.e. the ones who have insisted for about 2 years now that JC is in another real estate bubble.

Posted on: 12/8 16:38
Top


Re: How teachers unions drive Jersey’s pension crisis
#24
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:
Bamb00zle wrote:
As I said, it's going to get ugly... Oh wait, it already did get ugly.

And yet, you're still here. Hmm.

And again, where do you plan to go, that you imagine you can avoid increases in state taxes, or pension crises? California? Mexico? Belize? Somalia?


Quote:
Some taxes went down – estate taxes are being reduced to align with the Federal exemptions.

Uh huh... Not really a reason for you to stick around, though. Unless you are caring for a wealthy parent. (Remember, the inheritance tax didn't change; only the direct heirs get this exemption.)

Heck, you don't need to even live in NJ to benefit from that. Only the deceased person needs to be a NJ resident.


Quote:
But please understand, I'm not paying for someone's irresponsible promises.

First, the promises weren't irresponsible. They were perfectly sustainable, until Gov Whitman started the habit of underfunding the pension system -- in 1995.

Second, if you move somewhere else, you will still be paying for someone else's pensions. Oh, I mean "irresponsible promises."

Third, I don't know where you grew up. Those of us who grew up in NJ were actually educated by those teachers and protected by those police officers and sometimes even helped by state employees, and I have no problems paying what they are owed.


Quote:
And I don't think you or any else should either. There's nothing the state of NJ can do to prevent people from leaving and escaping the onerous taxes here. Thousands have already.

You sure about that?

Resized Image


Quote:
My bags are packed ready and waiting by the front door....

Promises, promises


Quote:
There are plenty of interesting, fun places to go other than NJ.

And yet, you keep not leaving. Huh.

Don't get me wrong, I agree there are many other fine places to live, and I don't plan to live in NJ forever. However, I'm not planning to bolt the door in the slightly ridiculous attempt to avoid paying state taxes, especially since so many other states are facing the same issues, or making matters worse for their citizens by cutting taxes.

Posted on: 12/6 18:50
Top


Re: How teachers unions drive Jersey’s pension crisis
#25
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Nice try... as I suspected, your quoted numbers are not for enlisted personnel. Instead it is averaging compensations of officers *and* enlisted personnel.

Good grief. Did you not read your own words? You said that both officers and enlisted were underpaid.

For those enlisted soldiers, at year 1: Base pay + BAH + BAS + tax credit basically equals $50k. 10 years in, if you do well, it's more like $70k.

That doesn't include health care, retirement, special pay, education while in service, educational assistance after discharge, etc.

And yes, that's very different than combining CEO and regular staff pay. These days, CEOs are getting paid anywhere from 250 to 350 times a typical employee at their company. And while I'm sure that the top brass are well compensated, I'm pretty sure they don't get paid $12 million a year in total compensation. O-10 is more like $200k.

Posted on: 12/6 16:52
Top


Re: How teachers unions drive Jersey’s pension crisis
#26
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Bamb00zle wrote:
Quote:

Dolomiti wrote:
lol

Do you still live in NJ? If not, when do YOU plan to leave?


Me...? Thanks for asking - I'm packed, ready to go.

Gas tax just went up. Send us a postcard from... where are you going, exactly?


Quote:
Sorry, I don't have any painless solutions to advance, nor have I seen any proposed here, or any place else for that matter. Any realistic proposal I've seen involves both raising taxes and cutting benefits. Neither of which will be fun.

And not unique to NJ.

Ironically, the states that are slashing their tax bills are running into different problems, namely they need to slash spending -- including on education -- because the don't have enough revenues. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.


Quote:
It's the raising taxes part that has me most concerned. I pay enough tax already and I need my money....

Awwww poor baby

Well, good luck finding a state that pays relatively high wages, has decent job opportunities, offers decent public transportation, a rich cultural life, and doesn't sock taxpayers -- or isn't slashing spending to the bone. That leaves, uh... Houston?

But hey, at least you'll get a bigger apartment. W00t!

Posted on: 12/6 16:33
Top


Re: How teachers unions drive Jersey’s pension crisis
#27
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Frinjc wrote:
Can someone confirm the data on the annual fees Wall Street gets for the pension funds management? I thought it went from ~$250M under Corzine to ~$600M under Christie. As Maggy Thatcher would say, this is MY money.

AFAIK: Most pension funds manage themselves. What they do is buy a variety of financial instruments, some from Wall Street banks. So, the fees vary, and are included in calculations of returns.

Here's the state pension annual reports. Have at it:
http://www.state.nj.us/treasury/pensions/annrprts.shtml

Posted on: 12/5 23:27
Top


Re: How teachers unions drive Jersey’s pension crisis
#28
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Bamb00zle wrote:
Interesting string about an intractable issue...

Dolomiti says the state is legally obligated to pay that money.... and that's right, but allow me to finish that sentence so it's abundantly clear: The state is legally obligated to pay that money BY FURTHER INCREASING TAXES ON THE TAXPAYERS OF NEW JERSEY.

Yes, thanks for stating the obvious. Don't forget we would have faced much lower bills if governors had done their jobs in the first place. And that Christie also hiked the teachers' contribution requirements... and then reneged on his agreement to bolster the teachers' pension fund.


Quote:
And, just in case you haven't noticed, we already pay the highest property taxes, among the highest income and sales taxes, have the most under-funded pension, and second lowest credit rating of any state in the country.

Yep, kinda sucks. That doesn't change anything.


Quote:
My suggestion: leave the state – thousands have already. If you must stay, and own a place, sell it NOW and rent instead.

lol

Do you still live in NJ? If not, when do YOU plan to leave?


Quote:
Ask yourself, how attractive is NJ real estate going to be in a few years time under any plausible scenario – pensions paid or not.

Well, California was probably in much worse shape a few years ago than NJ is today -- in no small part because decades ago, the voters blocked regular increases in property taxes, which makes the state highly dependent upon more volatile sources of income. And yet, they seem to have largely pulled themselves out of it.

And of course, we see other states like Kansas, who are slashing taxes in an explicit attempt to encourage business... and are devastating state revenues.

And of course, numerous other municipalities and states have gotten themselves into the exact same type of pension problems.

So tell us, oh prophet: What state will be better off?

Posted on: 12/5 23:23
Top


Re: How teachers unions drive Jersey’s pension crisis
#29
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

Dolomiti wrote:
Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
[quote]
Dolomiti wrote:
[quote]One public employee that is definitely underpaid (ridiculously so) is the American soldier. Whether it is a commissioned officer, or an enlisted serviceman, those salaries are definitely too low and I'm glad to see a pension system in place for them.

You sure about that?

A 2010 study showed that the average compensation for a US active duty soldier is $100,000. 60% of this was non-cash (housing, medical etc).


Show me a study that calculates the average enlisted soldier is getting 100K in total compensation.

I already did. According to that study (page 39 of the PDF I linked), after taxes, each soldier costs the US $140,000 per year; some of that is deferred, e.g. VA benefits.

This is from 2007, and the years are a little earlier. Table 1, page 13 of the PDF. 5 different studies, showing compensation between $90k and $140k.
https://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/file ... ts/06-29-compensation.pdf

It's basically the same as with the private sector. If your employer is paying for part of your health insurance, and contributes to a retirement plan, and gives you stock options, that's all part of your total compensation.


Quote:
And, by the way, using a metric of "total compensation" that incorporates food allowance, housing allowance, medical benefits would make every welfare recipient that receives medicaid, food stamps and public housing an upper middle class person.

sigh

Public benefits, including AFDC, ACA, Social Security, housing subsidies, unemployment, etc ARE classified as income for statistical measurements. Some of those are taxable as well (SS, unemployment).

Yes, it absolutely makes sense to include housing, food, medical care, education and more as part of active duty soldier's total compensation. Aside from the fact that they don't have to pay for those things out of base pay, that is why it's called "total compensation."

And no, those safety nets today don't pay much. That's conservative propaganda.

You can make the case that $100k isn't enough for an active duty soldier. But you'd be deeply wrong if the only thing you look at is base pay.


Quote:
As for the other part questioning my assessment of subpar work ethic, and performance, I made that statement based on personal experience working with various NYC agencies employees on various projects.

So basically, no real data. Very persuasive.


Quote:
The stuff that goes on would be grounds for dismissal in the private sector.

I've seen lots of people in the private sector get away with stuff that would be grounds for dismissal, even at some of the best companies in the world. So how should we resolve our dueling anecdotes?

Oh, I know. By recognizing that anecdotes are not in fact proof of broader trends, and that you cannot possibly determine the efficacy of around 22 million public employees in the US.

Posted on: 12/5 23:12
Top


Re: Hidden Hospital Costs Leave Some Patients With Sticker Shock
#30
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

brewster wrote:
My youngest was 2002, and there wasn't the same nonsense.

This was definitely happening in 2002; people have been complaining about the "$5 Tylenol pill" for a long, long time. It's only recently gotten any attention.


Quote:
I don't know how you protect yourself as an inpatient, someone will peek into your room, and send you a bill!!

I never had that happen when I was in the hospital. Every hospital staffer who entered my room had a legitimate medical reason to do so.


Quote:
If you get surgery you often never even meet the anesthesiologist but you get their bill.

Meaning what, they didn't actually put you under and supervise your health while you were unconscious, because they didn't shake your hand first?


Quote:
If I was an inpatient again I would post a sign on my bed instructing all personnel to either sign a waiver agreeing to abide by my insurers rates or walk away.

Yeah, that'll work... not

The hospital employees don't decide the amount to charge patients. That's up to the hospital, who negotiates the rates with the insurers long before you were admitted to the hospital.

I mean, really. What are you going to do, sit there with a stack of blank waivers? Demand that the nurses who are wheeling you into surgery sign those documents, when they have no control over what the hospital charges you? Are you going to demand that your doctor sign the waiver before treating you?

The bottom line is that medical costs are raging out of control because we treat health care like we do any other good or service, which is a massive mistake. Health care is not like clothing or food or gas; the profit motive ultimately does not make it more efficient. This will become even more obvious over the next few years, as the ACA gets dismantled and replaced with an even worse private system.

Posted on: 12/5 11:05
Top



TopTop
(1) 2 3 4 ... 24 »






Login
Username:

Password:

remember me

Lost Password?

Register now!



LicenseInformation | AboutUs | PrivacyPolicy | Faq | Contact


JERSEY CITY LIST - News & Reviews - Jersey City, NJ - Copyright 2004 - 2017