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Re: New Jersey to require schools to teach LGBT history
#61
Home away from home
Home away from home


Good.

Posted on: 6/6 22:55
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Re: New Jersey to require schools to teach LGBT history
#62
Home away from home
Home away from home


Good grief. Thank God for private schooling.

Posted on: 6/6 21:31
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New Jersey to require schools to teach LGBT history
#63
Home away from home
Home away from home


Hannan Adely, North Jersey Record

WOODLAND, N.J. – New Jersey has become the second state in the nation after California to adopt a law that requires schools to teach about LGBT history in a move hailed by civil rights groups as a step toward inclusion and fairness.

Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat who promised to promote equality for gay and transgender people during his campaign, signed the bill Thursday. Among those celebrating the news was Jaime Bruesehoff of Vernon, whose 12-year-old transgender child, Rebekah, spoke in support of the bill in Trenton in December.

“This bill is so important for our young people,” Bruesehoff said. “They need to see examples of themselves in the history being taught and in classes they are going to each day. We know representation matters.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/ed ... Um1lAAbchl82Bc4k9n2bA-q_0

Posted on: 6/6 18:02
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Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#64
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

MDM wrote:
One of the comments posted an interesting link:

40% of the Buildings in NYC couldn't be built today


Not surprising at all.

Dan, a "tenement" is simply a building intended as a multifamily, as opposed to many brownstones that were single family converted to multi. They were built for the middle and working class who could not afford single family homes. I cannot find any reference that says any were built for the poor, though some were so cheaply made they rapidly became undesirable for anyone but. It's extremely hard to make money from the poor for obvious reasons. Anyone doing it today is getting government money in some form. I find no evidence anyone "built for the poor" in the 19th century.

http://ci.columbia.edu/0240s/0243_2/0243_2_s1_text.html
Quote:
When the buildings were new, when the Tenement Museum on Orchard Street was new in the 1860s, it probably provided a decent place for immigrants, and the early residents were largely German in this case because most immigrants to New York in the mid-nineteenth century were German and Irish. But by the late nineteenth century, as little maintenance was done on the building as it deteriorated and as more and more people lived in the building, conditions got even worse.


FWIW, when people describe the building where I live as a brownstone I correct them and say it's a tenement.

Posted on: 6/6 16:41
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Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#65
Home away from home
Home away from home


What is silent from this conversation is the tax liens that happens every year. This past December 6,700 properties were in tax lien. Did all lose their property? No, about 2/3 were able to come up with the money. But these people are struggling because they are paying the taxes for others. Compare our taxes liens to Secaucus which does not promote affordable housing. That town had 13 tax liens, but I will grant it is a smaller town, if it had the same population as JC, that would be 200 people in lien. So where is the affordable housing for the small homeowner? What isn't that part of the conversation? It is not because someone must pay the tab.

Posted on: 6/6 16:04
Top


Re: New Electric Garbage Trucks...
#66
Home away from home
Home away from home


.
Jersey City to buy 5 electric garbage trucks with $2M in state funds

Today 11:20 AM (6/6/2019)
By Jordan Wolman | The Jersey Journal

Jersey City residents may soon notice some new additions to city streets thanks to $2 million in state funding.

New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection recently awarded Jersey City more than $2 million to purchase five new electric garbage trucks, which will replace the city’s fleet of diesel trucks.

The city’s proposal, aimed at curbing carbon emissions and improving air quality, was chosen from more than 150 submissions. The funds come out of the state’s $72.2 million share of federal settlements following a lawsuit against Volkswagen for recording fraudulent emission levels in their diesel vehicles.

https://www.nj.com/hudson/2019/06/jers ... th-2m-in-state-funds.html

Posted on: 6/6 15:57
Top


Re: New Electric Garbage Trucks...
#67
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

jc_dweller wrote:
Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

Left unmentioned: will the charging stations that will be accessible to the public be free? Most small to midsized cities around the country have moved to provide subsidize charging stations that provide free charging to the public during non-business hours. This is a great way to encourage adoption of EVs by the general public.

Right now, the largest obstacle to EV ownership in JC, or any other urban city, is a lack of convenient charging solutions. Cities that deploy charging stations in government buildings and parking lots help address that problem by making them available for general use after hours, and most of them do so free of charge. It would be nice to see the same here.


Isn't the entire block of First between Marin and Provost charging stations? I'm not saying it's enough to shift the market, but there are a lot there and they're never fully occupied.


I did mention that stretch of charging stations in one of previous replies. But, it should be pointed out that there are two sections to the street charging units. The easternmost section (directly in front of The ArtHouse JC) are zoned for EXCLUSIVE use by EVs, and the municipal code stipulates that the cars must be plugged in and charging. There is a huge caveat, though: the charging stations are from the ChargePoint network, but only 2 of them are available to the general public. The others are actually "restricted use" and you must have a further membership with Greenspot in order to use them. The western section (the one in front of The Oakman) are actually NOT EV exclusive, so they are usually taken by regular vehicles. Of those stations, I think most (or, all?) are fully available to any ChargePoint customer. The rates being levied by ChargePoint at those stations are REALLY high.

In any case, whether 10 or 15 stations are available, this is very limited, and not entirely practical, unless you happen to live close by. There are 20 Tesla chargers at the Newport Mall parking lot, along with a few stations from other networks, and those see a lot of use. The city has not made a conscious effort to support an EV charging infrastructure, and so that makes the adoption of EVs locally more challenging than it needs to be.

As for the other concerns mentioned by the other poster, the matter of range anxiety is very overblown (most people only commute short distances and seldom require roundtrips longer than 100 miles) and newer standards and technologies allow some EVs to charge at very high rates, and battery capacity continues to improve. The only time an EV becomes impractical for the average person is when attempting a long road trip, as charging times make it entirely impractical, unless you are driving a Tesla, which are able to go longer, and charge in a fraction of the time.

Posted on: 6/6 14:45
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Hamilton Park's 34th Annual Park Festival 2019
#68
Newbie
Newbie


The Hamilton Park Neighborhood Association’s Park Festival will be taking place in celebration of its 34th year on June 8th from 12-6pm! Like every year, the event will include wonderful live music, food from all cultures and tons of entertainment. The activities include a petting zoo, music, delicious food vendors, bouncy house and so much more. Open to all and it's free!

More info: http://jcfamilies.com/event/park-fest ... amilton-park-jersey-city/

Posted on: 6/6 14:43
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Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#69
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

JCGuys wrote:


The comments section is a fun read as it points out the many flaws in the PhD student's analysis.



One of the comments posted an interesting link:

40% of the Buildings in NYC couldn't be built today

Posted on: 6/6 13:36
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#70
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

DanL wrote:
Does Upzoning Boost the Housing Supply and Lower Prices? Maybe Not. - https://www.citylab.com/life/2019/01/z ... nt-gentrification/581677/



That's a comically flawed "study" by a PhD student. It concludes that upzoning did not result in additional units being built and raised the cost of real estate.

Quote:
Freemark reaches two startling conclusions that should at least temper our enthusiasm about the potential of zoning reform to solve the housing crisis—conclusions that, interestingly enough, he has said he did not set out to find. First, he finds no effect from zoning changes on housing supply—that is, on the construction of newly permitted units over five years. (As he acknowledges, the process of adding supply is arduous and may take longer than five years to register.) Caveats and all, this is an important finding that is very much at odds with the conventional wisdom.

Second, instead of falling prices, as the conventional wisdom predicts, the study finds the opposite. Housing prices rose on the parcels and in projects that were upzoned, notably those where building sizes increased.


The comments section is a fun read as it points out the many flaws in the PhD student's analysis.

Posted on: 6/6 12:42
Top


Re: New Electric Garbage Trucks...
#71
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

Left unmentioned: will the charging stations that will be accessible to the public be free? Most small to midsized cities around the country have moved to provide subsidize charging stations that provide free charging to the public during non-business hours. This is a great way to encourage adoption of EVs by the general public.

Right now, the largest obstacle to EV ownership in JC, or any other urban city, is a lack of convenient charging solutions. Cities that deploy charging stations in government buildings and parking lots help address that problem by making them available for general use after hours, and most of them do so free of charge. It would be nice to see the same here.


Isn't the entire block of First between Marin and Provost charging stations? I'm not saying it's enough to shift the market, but there are a lot there and they're never fully occupied.

Posted on: 6/6 12:17
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#72
Home away from home
Home away from home


Does Upzoning Boost the Housing Supply and Lower Prices? Maybe Not. - https://www.citylab.com/life/2019/01/z ... nt-gentrification/581677/

‘Build More Housing’ Is No Match for Inequality - https://www.citylab.com/equity/2019/05 ... inequality-cities/588997/

In the past, for profit developers built small row and frame homes for the working class and tenements for the poor. there has always been money to be made from servicing the low income.



Quote:

brewster wrote:
Quote:

DanL wrote:
in theory, the market works, in practice developers and investors build only luxury or top of the market housing both here and elsewhere without subsidies and government restrictions/requirements.

What is the data you base this claim on the effect of loosened zoning over a whole region? I have not heard of it being done. The effect of redevelopment zones is NOT what we're talking about, but of allowing as of right 4-6 floor midrise density anywhere we currently have R-1.

But even were I to concede you are correct, if enough was built it would have the same effect. Inventory at the top would relieve the downward pressure of gentrification. Jane Jacobs said the tradition ecology of cities was that housing was built for the wealthy and handed down to those less well off as it got tatty, ending up as slums. No one ever built housing for the poor until the era of public housing projects, a dismal failure of the ideas of Le Corbusier and his compatriots.

Zoning and rent control interrupted this "natural" process. There was never enough built postwar to relieve the shortage, and then rent control doomed large numbers of prewar apartment building to destruction because it was not worth maintaining them for the rents allowed. Today it seems illogical that there was a shortage of housing and vacancy rates never fell at a time when apartment buildings were being abandoned, but that is the history. The NYC vacancy rate never rose above the 5% level to stand down from a "rent emergency".

Posted on: 6/6 12:13
Top


Re: New Electric Garbage Trucks...
#73
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

dcourts1984 wrote:
What is a total no-brainer for all cars and this is the direction things are going, is the mass implementation of hybrid motors by car makers.


When the Prius came out I thought all cars would be hybrids within a decade, it just made so much damn sense. Now it's more than 2, and they're still exotic. What a mess. You're right, every transit, fleet or local business vehicle on the road should be EV.

Posted on: 6/6 2:07
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#74
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

DanL wrote:
in theory, the market works, in practice developers and investors build only luxury or top of the market housing both here and elsewhere without subsidies and government restrictions/requirements.

What is the data you base this claim on the effect of loosened zoning over a whole region? I have not heard of it being done. The effect of redevelopment zones is NOT what we're talking about, but of allowing as of right 4-6 floor midrise density anywhere we currently have R-1.

But even were I to concede you are correct, if enough was built it would have the same effect. Inventory at the top would relieve the downward pressure of gentrification. Jane Jacobs said the tradition ecology of cities was that housing was built for the wealthy and handed down to those less well off as it got tatty, ending up as slums. No one ever built housing for the poor until the era of public housing projects, a dismal failure of the ideas of Le Corbusier and his compatriots.

Zoning and rent control interrupted this "natural" process. There was never enough built postwar to relieve the shortage, and then rent control doomed large numbers of prewar apartment building to destruction because it was not worth maintaining them for the rents allowed. Today it seems illogical that there was a shortage of housing and vacancy rates never fell at a time when apartment buildings were being abandoned, but that is the history. The NYC vacancy rate never rose above the 5% level to stand down from a "rent emergency".

Posted on: 6/6 2:00
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#75
Home away from home
Home away from home


in theory, the market works, in practice developers and investors build only luxury or top of the market housing both here and elsewhere without subsidies and government restrictions/requirements.


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
How can you have affordable housing when taxpayers paid $909 million to the county, school, and city governments in 2018? The way affordable housing is done is by passing off low income housing taxes onto the general tax paying homeowner who does not have a tax abatement. But that makes housing more expensive for that group of property owners. It is the equivalent of having a restaurant and charging one group a lower price, then inflate the price for another group to cover the group who had the reduced meal. Down the road, someone will pay the tab.


As usual, you find yourself out of your depth, but that doesnt stop you from spewing an uninformed opinion. You are conflating subsidized housing with the concept of "affordable housing". Affordable housing is about ensuring that there is enough supply to meet demand, so that prices are not driven up exuberantly because of competition for what little is available.

Affordable housing is about ensuring that a majority middle class is able to afford to live locally, and the working class is able to reside in relative proximity to where they work. So, instead of having $5,000 rents for a 2+ bedroom apartment, you end up with something lower. If instead of 1,000 units for 2,000 people you had 2,000 units for 2,000 people, competition is lowered and prices would not skyrocket. Encouraging the city to loosen zoning rules and limitations, along with approving development that helps alleviate the situation, is the smart thing to do: it is not subsidized, and it would allow us slow down the frenetic rent increases of recent times.

Posted on: 6/6 0:29
Top


Re: PATH (pathetic attempt at transporting humans)
#76
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Home away from home


.
Hate your commute? The PATH is hoping these music performances will help.

Today 7:00 PM (6/5/2019)
By Larry Higgs | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Can entertainment soothe the savage beast that is the daily commute? PATH is giving musicians and other performers a chance to do that in five rail stations starting on Thursday.

Local singers, dancers, musicians, comedians and poets will perform in PATH stations across Hudson County as part of the 2019 PATH Performs! series, starting this Thursday in Harrison. The program is intended enhance the travel experience for thousands of commuters while showcasing local performers, officials said.

Apollo Sonders, a Jersey-City based band, starts the program at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, at the Harrison Station. The band has performed at the Bowery Electric in New York City, World Café Live in Philadelphia, and the Asbury Hotel in Asbury Park, among other popular regional venues.

https://www.nj.com/traffic/2019/06/hat ... rformances-will-help.html

Posted on: 6/5 23:38
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Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#77
Home away from home
Home away from home


Several years ago, there was a Jersey Journal article on the loss of taxes not collected from abatements, then the loss was $80 million a year. So, what will be the loss with new affordable housing? The public should be told. The public is told what ingredients go into a can of soup or the fabrics of our clothes, so why hide the information on the cost of affordable housing?

Posted on: 6/5 23:02
Top


Re: New Electric Garbage Trucks...
#78
Quite a regular
Quite a regular


This is a great step in the right direction. These are fleet vehicles that have a very rigid and defined scheduled use which easily allows for EV ownership.

For individuals in JC (and elsewhere for the matter), owning an EV is nearly impossible. There is not enough of a charging infrastructure that would make it feasible for the average car owner. California is a classic example. Has massive demand and still cannot build the charging network to meet it. I'm all for EV's, but we are a far ways away from making it accessible, easy and range anxiety free.

What is a total no-brainer for all cars and this is the direction things are going, is the mass implementation of hybrid motors by car makers. This allows for zero charging, no range anxiety and heavily reduces emissions. 90% of people driving a modern hybrid would have no clue about the difference from a driving and more important, ownership experience.

Summary.....buy a Hybrid. Once there are local charging stations readily available and you don't need to travel long distances, by and EV.

Posted on: 6/5 23:00
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#79
Quite a regular
Quite a regular


Quote:

brewster wrote:
Quote:

JCBORN wrote:
I think everyone knew the rents were going to go up once the RE taxes went up. Now we have a crisis and we don't know what to do with ourselves.


Incorrect. Taxes did NOT go up in the reval, the load got redistributed to be more fair. Many properties saw taxes go down.


You are right. Many property owners did see their taxes go down. Chances are those properties were not downtown and their rents may not be as high. The previous post mentioned DTJC with a rent of 3.2K for a 1bedroom. I would be surprised if you cannot find a 1 bedroom in Greenville for about 1k. I would not call that a crisis. If you cannot afford to live downtown you have other options. It is almost like buying a car and knowing your budget.
When my taxes were "redistributed" I had to "redistribute" with my tenants. Otherwise, I would have to sell since I would be in the red every month.

Posted on: 6/5 22:27
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#80
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

JCBORN wrote:
I think everyone knew the rents were going to go up once the RE taxes went up. Now we have a crisis and we don't know what to do with ourselves.


Incorrect. Taxes did NOT go up in the reval, the load got redistributed to be more fair. Many properties saw taxes go down.

Posted on: 6/5 21:35
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#81
Quite a regular
Quite a regular


I think everyone knew the rents were going to go up once the RE taxes went up. Now we have a crisis and we don't know what to do with ourselves.

Posted on: 6/5 20:19
Top


Re: Nimbus Announces 2019 Youth Summer Programs!
#82
Home away from home
Home away from home


Final Open House for JC SummerArts:
Saturday, June 8, 1-3pm
at Nimbus: 165 Newark Avenue


Resized Image

Visit Nimbus' studio on Saturday, June 8 for information and free trial classes with JC SummerArts staff:
Saturday June 8, 1-3pm
at Nimbus, 165 Newark Avenue

About JC SummerArts:
In 6 individually themed weeks, students receive classes in dance, theater, music, and fine arts, ending in a weekly performance for family and friends.

Ages:Ages 4-11yrs
Location:165 Newark Ave.
Time: 9-4pm
Early Drop-off & Late Pick up available
Dates:
July 22 - August 30, 2019
Price: $475
Full 6 Weeks: $1,850

Posted on: 6/5 19:37
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Re: New Electric Garbage Trucks...
#83
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
Quote:

K-Lo2 wrote:
Quote:
All the no turn on red signs recently put up has been terrible for air quality.
...but a whole lot better for pedestrians. Every other driver never looked right for who was on the curb, stepping off.


Perhaps. But, a couple of problems: people continue to flaunt that type of signage (never have I lived or visited anywhere where STOP signs are treated as entirely optional) and enforcement is abysmal. Additionally, while drivers around here are overly entitled and downright dangerous, the pedestrians are not any better: lots of people jump off the curb from in between parked cars without seeming regard for their own person. And, add to that the many asswipes that ride on sidewalks and come out flying at intersections, and you have a recipe for chaos, which is exactly what happens. I have had a TON of people come off sidewalks on bikes at high speed and as a driver you are not expecting (or, looking for) cyclists to appear in a crosswalk as you are approaching or about to cross.


Pedestrians without self preservation skills truly amaze me. I can't tell you how many times I've been in the middle of a parallel park when someone walks between me and the car I'm about to kiss. A postal worker did it the other day and looked at me in disgust when I pointed out to her she nearly got hit.

Engineer all you want, without enforcement the shitshow will continue.

Posted on: 6/5 17:44
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#84
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

brewster wrote:
Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
I would argue it is better to attract MORE residents than businesses, as residents would have an emotional and physical bond to the city, instead of the daytime employees that come here, clog our streets, speed like crazy, and generally have no vested interest in our communities.


But people like Yvonne disagree with that totally, as do places like Silicon Valley cities, who lure vast numbers of well paying jobs that bring in tax dollars, but refuse to allow adequate housing for those workers to be built driving home prices to astronomic levels. Everyone wins except the new workers who have to either spend all their salary on housing or commute 2 hrs each way.


The Silicon Valley thing is truly a mess: in between NIMBY types opposing more housing construction, existing overly restrictive zoning laws, and the booming dot-com / tech industries, the situation there will not improve anytime soon, if ever. Housing starts are not even half what they need per year, making it near impossible to ever recover. Sadly, the parallels with JC are many. It is no coincidence (nor at all surprising) that even previously shunned or ignored areas are seeing a huge influx of newcomers. Greenville will soon be no different than BeLa, as more yuppies come to JC but are unable to afford the DTJC rents. Many buildings in DTJC (mine included) now command 3.2K / month for a 1bd/1ba, and vacancies only last a short time before getting snapped up.

Posted on: 6/5 17:19
Top


Re: New Electric Garbage Trucks...
#85
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

K-Lo2 wrote:
Quote:
All the no turn on red signs recently put up has been terrible for air quality.
...but a whole lot better for pedestrians. Every other driver never looked right for who was on the curb, stepping off.


Perhaps. But, a couple of problems: people continue to flaunt that type of signage (never have I lived or visited anywhere where STOP signs are treated as entirely optional) and enforcement is abysmal. Additionally, while drivers around here are overly entitled and downright dangerous, the pedestrians are not any better: lots of people jump off the curb from in between parked cars without seeming regard for their own person. And, add to that the many asswipes that ride on sidewalks and come out flying at intersections, and you have a recipe for chaos, which is exactly what happens. I have had a TON of people come off sidewalks on bikes at high speed and as a driver you are not expecting (or, looking for) cyclists to appear in a crosswalk as you are approaching or about to cross.

Posted on: 6/5 17:14
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#86
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

bodhipooh wrote:
I would argue it is better to attract MORE residents than businesses, as residents would have an emotional and physical bond to the city, instead of the daytime employees that come here, clog our streets, speed like crazy, and generally have no vested interest in our communities.


But people like Yvonne disagree with that totally, as do places like Silicon Valley cities, who lure vast numbers of well paying jobs that bring in tax dollars, but refuse to allow adequate housing for those workers to be built driving home prices to astronomic levels. Everyone wins except the new workers who have to either spend all their salary on housing or commute 2 hrs each way.

Posted on: 6/5 16:12
Top


Re: New Electric Garbage Trucks...
#87
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:
All the no turn on red signs recently put up has been terrible for air quality.
...but a whole lot better for pedestrians. Every other driver never looked right for who was on the curb, stepping off.

Posted on: 6/5 16:09
Top


Re: New Electric Garbage Trucks...
#88
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

135jc wrote:
All the no turn on red signs recently put up has been terrible for air quality.


Yet more reason to encourage adoption of EVs by the general population. NYC has adopted well defined plans to try and get a large percentage of cars on the road to be electric (desired goal is at least 20%, iirc) and while it may seem lofty, over in Norway they have achieved even greater numbers. In fact, during the past quarter (or, year?) the majority of new car registrations were for EVs. With the right policies in place, an entire country is being transformed in a few years. There is no reason why we couldn't accomplish the same. There are some very real and valid benefits to increased adoption of EVs, chief among them an improvement in general air quality. Currently, NYC has one of the highest pediatric asthma incidence in the nation, which has spurred the city into adoption stringent idling laws, and to push for EV adoption.

If we are serious about becoming the best mid-sized city in the US, we should be studying what other cities are doing and perhaps emulate some of their policies.

Posted on: 6/5 14:16
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#89
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Yvonne wrote:
Vacant land requires few services but people do require services: more police, more fire stations, roads, schools, parks and more public employees to handle services. Then there is the infrastructure for water and sewerage. Actually, in the Mount Laurel decision, there was a cost analysis of what new construction will cost that town. Then the township back in the 1980s had a cost of $35,000 for every new resident. That figure will probably be triple today. For JC, the immediate concerns is education. How do we pay for more schools and teachers with influx of families especially in Bayfront which expects 10,000 more residents. By the way, Bayfront will cost JC homeowners a bond of $170 million and that does not include the interest over the next 20 years.


Be that as it may, additional residents means additional revenue. Those people that will cost the city $170 million in a bond, will be contributing tax revenue for years to come, and if we can get the city to be more judicious about their spending, there is no reason why things should not work out in the end.

In the end, it seems to me like you would like JC to remain "as is" without any additional growth or changes. It is an unrealistic goal/desire: not only are people wanting to come here, but the idea that you can stifle growth and change is simply unrealistic and the logical conclusion of a city that doesn't grow or welcome newcomers is that it will eventually die off, as the existing people die or leave.

In fact, since you like anecdotes so much, here is a personal one from my recent trips all over Europe visiting small towns and villages: all over Spain, Portugal, and Italy, entire towns and villages are becoming essentially ghost towns as younger people flock to the large cities (Lisboa and Porto in Portugal, Paris, Bordeaux and Lyon in France, and Barcelona, Madrid, Malaga in Spain) and leave behind their hometowns. These smaller towns that have failed to attract business and people are literally dying off, as older people remain and then die, and empty storefronts abound. It is a stark sight to roll into a small town that is almost deserted and devoid of life. I wouldn't want that fate for Jersey City, and there is no reason for that to be the case. In fact, I would argue it is better to attract MORE residents than businesses, as residents would have an emotional and physical bond to the city, instead of the daytime employees that come here, clog our streets, speed like crazy, and generally have no vested interest in our communities.

Posted on: 6/5 14:10
Top


Re: Spotlight On: Affordable housing
#90
Home away from home
Home away from home


Vacant land requires few services but people do require services: more police, more fire stations, roads, schools, parks and more public employees to handle services. Then there is the infrastructure for water and sewerage. Actually, in the Mount Laurel decision, there was a cost analysis of what new construction will cost that town. Then the township back in the 1980s had a cost of $35,000 for every new resident. That figure will probably be triple today. For JC, the immediate concerns is education. How do we pay for more schools and teachers with influx of families especially in Bayfront which expects 10,000 more residents. By the way, Bayfront will cost JC homeowners a bond of $170 million and that does not include the interest over the next 20 years.

Posted on: 6/5 2:17
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