Register now !    Login  
Main Menu
Who's Online
58 user(s) are online (37 user(s) are browsing Message Forum)

Members: 2
Guests: 56

Bike_Lane, BeatrixKiddo, more...


Forum Index


Board index » All Posts




Re: Post your Pimp Sightings Here
Home away from home
Home away from home


A few weeks ago I spotted the Pimp near VVP on a rainy day. The adulation has gone to his head – he acted like he was a rock star or something. I casually checked him out – dressed in baby blue suit with a matching baby blue umbrella, and he shot me back a look as if to say– WHO YOU LOOKIN AT! What does he expect?

Posted on: 2006/8/6 16:11
Top


Re: Police Chief Robert Troy says -- "Stevie...has exhibited serious incompetence"
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

agoodword wrote:
Let me ask a question. Can you do better?


Moot query; Troy is gone, or don't you read the papers!

Posted on: 2006/8/6 14:05
Resized Image
Help US Sue Spectra! Join OR Donate!
Top


Re: Police Chief Robert Troy says -- "Stevie...has exhibited serious incompetence"
Newbie
Newbie


Let me ask a question. Can you do better?

Posted on: 2006/8/6 14:03
Top


Re: Positive things I like about JC
Newbie
Newbie


Just Realizing HOW awesome IT IS to live in JC!

1. Madame Claudes (get the hangar steak with shallot sauce, or the smoked salmon crepe)

2. Path Train (Always Reliable, even during blackouts)

3. MANY Dunkin Donut's

4. Diversity!!! and EVERYONE seems to accept everyone!!

5. Friendlyness/Understanding (if that is even a word) I have smiled at and had more people smile at me during the heat wave, than ever before.

6. The 24 hour Fried Chicken Places!!! THANK YOU!

7. Ibby's!! That place makes me dream of Falafals and Hummus!!

8. The Waterfront, always relaxing!

9. The Street Festivals and Block Parties

10. The Grove Street Pimp!!! I am DYING to see him!

11. Kenny on the PATH train, who is collecting food for the Bergen Lafayette women and children!!!!

VIVA LA JERSEY CITY!!!!

Posted on: 2006/8/6 2:43
Top


Re: Fulop Calls for Resignation of Police Chief Robert Troy
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

RABBITRABBIT wrote:
Quote:

communipaw wrote:

Nothing Of Importance


Shaddup.


Resized ImageResized Image

Posted on: 2006/8/5 13:08
Resized Image
Help US Sue Spectra! Join OR Donate!
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Home away from home
Home away from home


In response to a question above, I don't have a zoning map handy, but R-1 is by far the most predominant district in Jersey City. It is essentially everywhere where you see one and two family houses.

The historic districts are not included, but everything adjacent would. Italian Village, for example, would be subject to this.

Each Ward has this, and would have its streetscape ruined. Ward E might have a little less because of a) the historic districts, and b) the large number of redevelopment plans (which have their own rules). But make no mistake, this affects everyone. Even if you don't live in R-1, you probably live close to it. And if you ever want to drive to any other part of the city to shop or visit friends, good luck finding parking. I already have a problem when I go to services at Temple Beth-El because there are so many curb cuts (either grandfathered in or illegal) and I can't find a place to park).

A few other things that make this ordinance so bad.

1) Currently, the ordinance requires that any building follow the predominant setback on the block (that is, the space between the property line and the building line). If you have a row of houses with front yards set back, the new buildings have to fit in. If you have houses with stoops that come out to the property line, the buildings also have to fit in.

The ordinance creates a 15 foot maximum front yard set back with no minimum and no predominant setback requirement. This would essentially destroy any uniformity of streetscape. One planning board member compared it to looking at a face with broken teeth.

2) To make up for the lost building space that will be created with carports, the ordinance lowers the required backyard space by 10 feet. This will lead to a "stealth de-greening" of the city. 10 feet at a time doesn't seem like much, but when you multiply it over every R-1 lot it is disastrous, particularly in the low lying flood hazard zones.

3) As noted by others, the carports would create a sea of concrete and make our streets pedestrian unfriendly. The proliferation of carports detracts from streetscapes, encourages tear downs of older, historic properties in order to build "cookie cutters, creates a safety hazard especially for children and the disabled, will make it near impossible to plant or keep trees on the streets.

The ultimately irony here is that this actually DECREASES PARKING. The proponent of the ordinance, Ward D councilman Bill Gaughan, justifies this by saying that one can create three spaces (two in a garage and one outside) which will ultimately increase parking. But this does nothing to create public parking. And any carport removes a space 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Bill Gaughan's response to this is that his primary concern is his homeowners in the Heights, who want to be able to park in their front yard. He admitted that parking for visitors or shoppers does not concern him.

All this ordinance does is benefit a) homeowners who own multiple cars and treat Jersey City like its a suburb and b) developers who are devoted to tearing down older historic houses in order to create ugly cookie cutters. It hurts everyone else.

This ordinance was first reviewed by the planning board last month. The planning board members recognized the problems in this ordinance, and public comment was unanimously against it. The public speakers included preservationists, environmentalists, neighborhood associations and merchant's groups. The planning board in fact REFUSED to recommend the ordinance.

But it nevertheless went to the council for a first reading (during the summer, when they have day meetings and no one shows up). It was approved on the first reading. It now goes back to the planning board on Tuesday and then for a second reading at yet another day meeting in August.

I have spoken with various council members about this, and they all acknowledge that the ordinance has flaws. The only thing they say in support is "but Gaughan really wants it."

This ordinance can be defeated or at the very least mitigated if people work hard enough. But what is needed is widespread public comment from all areas of the city. If you can, please attend the planning board meeting to voice your opposition. In addition, opposition is needed at the city council meeting. In the meantime, call your ward councilmembers (and the at large council members) asking them to at the very least delay voting on the bill until September, when there can be more widespread public comment. It may also be possible for the planning board to ask for major re-working of the bill.

Ultimately, this bill turns much of Jersey City into an ugly and poorly planned version of suburbia, and does not even get to the root of the parking problem. Although it appears innocuous on its face, the bill is fatally flawed and should be vigorously opposed.

Joshua Parkhurst
President
Jersey City Landmarks Conservancy

Posted on: 2006/8/5 8:19
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


A QUICK NOTE TO OUR ELECTED OFFICIALS:

This has to be the most reprehensible idea ever.

Treeless streets?

Concrete up and down every corridor?

Can we uglyfy Jersey City any further?

Can we strip a city of its charm and character and essence even more?

I don't think so.

Come on, elected officials--don't do this to future generations.

Don't do this to US.

A mistake unlike any Jersey City has ever seen--that's what this is.

It's unacceptable and downright distressing that this is even on the table.

Take it off and do Jersey City right--no, do it proud.

Give us some greenery--no, don't GIVE us, just let us KEEP what's in place already.

We'd like to continue stepping outside our own front doors to confront shade and beauty.

Thank you for coming to your senses, and we expect you to fully demonstrate that on August 16 at the City Council meeting you so strategically scheduled for 10AM.

Posted on: 2006/8/5 0:39
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


i like that the 'bad and ugly' example on the 1st post...

http://www.savethepalisades.org/pages/zoning.html

is my block in the heights! oh the shame.

we might have more 'parking spaces' cause of this R1 zoning on my block, but we still have the same parking issues ... no parking. and still lots of ticketing by the parking authority. ugg.

Posted on: 2006/8/5 0:08
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

brewster wrote:
Might I point out that a driveway takes 10 feet of curb while a car takes 20 feet. A 2 car driveway, while ugly, would actually add 1 new parking spot to the street total. Of course 2 of those might be empty but unavailable some percentage of the time, but that would coincide with the times it's easy to find a spot anyway.


It wouldn't add any parking, it would take it away. Think about it--how wide are the houses in JC? If each house on a street had a driveway, it effectively would mean no parking at all. Look at 4th street west of Jersey, where they have driveways--how many cars can park on those streets where the driveways are? Zero. And those are one-car driveways. Look at the houses on York west of Grove--those are two-car driveways, no one can park there, either. You may want to rationalize that parking two cars in a driveway will take them off the street, but it doesn't create space, it simply promotes car ownership.

And think of Hoboken, where there are tons of single-car garages and deeded spots--how easy is it to park there? That's where we're headed.

Posted on: 2006/8/4 22:51
"Someday a book will be written on how this city can be broke in the midst of all this development." ---Brewster

Oh, wait, there is one: The Jersey Sting.
Top


Re: Mapping Crime in Ward E - Steven Fulop
Newbie
Newbie


Ross

At least someone from downtown still has a sense of humour and isn't living in fear of saying hello to their neighbor who may not look exactly like they do. After all who really wants to associate with people who don't have that perfect pale skin (or bottled tan) buried under their perfect page 82 J Crew khaki's and pale blue polo shirt outfit.


Oh and just one other safety note... I've heard that there are several teenaged boys playing in the park on wayne street who have been using this dangerous orange ball... It's about a foot and half in diameter and could cause injury if it hits you. So watch out!!! They usually throw it up towards a pole and basket sort of contraption, but it could carom off and hit you in the head.

I nominate CRAPKIN as word of the day. Thanks for the chuckle.

Posted on: 2006/8/4 21:18
Top


Re: 77 Hudson will be two Manhattan-style 500-foot skyscrapers in Jersey City -including 1,000 units
Newbie
Newbie


this towers are beautiful they will give jc pristige

Posted on: 2006/8/4 21:13
Top


Re: 77 Hudson will be two Manhattan-style 500-foot skyscrapers in Jersey City -including 1,000 units
Newbie
Newbie


do you think that three years the prices will fall and it will be better i am down in miami were the same rennasaice its taing place and i think is also better that projects are taking that long like our met 3 which will be 76 stories and it will house a whole woods food... it will take three years to be built..

Posted on: 2006/8/4 21:12
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

timebandit wrote:
Beware the Jersey City Parking Authority


LMAO! Great Photo.

Posted on: 2006/8/4 19:14
Resized Image
Help US Sue Spectra! Join OR Donate!
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Newbie
Newbie



Posted on: 2006/8/4 19:08
Top


Re: Study: Diversity rises in suburbs - whites increasing in urban areas.
Home away from home
Home away from home


From Curbed:
Upper East Side: Where The Better Half Parties

Thursday, June 23, 2005, by Lockhart

The Post reports today that hip downtowners are moving to the staid grounds of the Upper East Side, seeking a residential life that's, well, just more boring than life amid an endless sprawl of trendy bars and restaurants. Don't believe this is actually a trend? Take the word of Frederick Lesort, "owner of the eponymous uptown private club and a newly opened restaurant on Madison Avenue":
"Uptown may not be the trendiest crowd, but it's a much better clientele," he says. "It's more faithful. You don't have to be the hottest, trendiest restaurant. You just have to take care of people. The social aspect of it is not so crucial. But downtown, a place has to be trendy - and even if it is, within three months that's over, and it has to close."
Ah, Frederick's, that mellowest of nightlife venues, of which Citysearch notes, "Patrons are marked with a stamp of approval upon entry into the subterranean space." Adds another happy Upper East Side customer, "There is an Upper East Side element to me. I'm slightly preppy. I'm from Connecticut."

-----------------

From the NY Post

DOWN WITH UPTOWN - FED UP WITH DOWNTOWN, A NEW CROWD FALLS FOR UPPER EAST SIDE; IT'S A NEW UPTOWN WHIRL

BYLINE: MAUREEN CALLAHAN

In the same way that something tragically uncool often becomes kind of cool (like tunics, or Justin Timberlake) the staid, charmless Upper East Side is becoming the neighborhood of choice for those New Yorkers who would consider themselves avant-garde, anti-establishment and ahead of the curve: namely, downtowners.

"In my neighborhood, there are a couple of really funny Williamsburg-type kids who are up there and loving it," says Upper East Sider Will Hooks, a 27-year-old assistant art director at Entertainment Weekly who himself moved from Williamsburg two years ago. Hooks finds his new neighborhood cleaner, calmer, cheaper and less sartorially stressful.

"In Williamsburg, I had to wear my corduroy pants or my tight jeans, and I was very emo-ish - even though I didn't listen to emo," he says, laughing. "I had mohawks. I had a mullet - and I'm black! That totally worked there, but it wouldn't work uptown."

Though freed from the strictures of the scenester dress code when he fled uptown, Hooks (who lives in a pocket of what is technically Spanish Harlem and home to a growing yuppie scene) asserts that even today, "you could not peg me as an Upper East Sider - especially with the downtown mentality that I have."

Citing boredom, overcrowding, poorly dressed tourists, cost of living, filth and the dilution of the scenester strain by, ironically, uptown kids, an increasing number of downtown habitues are opting for the novelty of Upper East Side living.

"We just sold an apartment on East 86th street to an East Village couple who had lived downtown forever," says Mary Jo Taubner of Douglas Elliman, who claims she's seen a definite spike in downtown-touptown migration over the past year. (Jonathan Miller, president and CEO of Miller Samuels Real Estate Appraisers, says he too has noticed a similar pattern emerging.)

Still, swaying lifelong scenesters to the Upper East Side is, Taubner says, "a harder sell. I have to reassure them that they aren't moving to an entirely different town."

What convinced the couple from the East Village, Taubner says, was that the Upper East Side triplex has a sister building in Gramercy Park with the same layout and architecture.

"That was what finally swayed them," she says. "They saw they could live similarly to the way they had downtown."

For every anxious East Villager who worries he'll be consigned to a ring of hell that consists only of Banana Republics, sports bars and D'Agostinos, there are those drawn to the Cinemascope beauty and aspirational quality of the Upper East Side.

That old-school idea extends culturally, with popular nightspots like Session 73 (one of the city's best jazz clubs) and gourmet shops like Agata & Valentina.

The stretch of First Avenue between 79th and 86th streets is studded with quirky boutiques that are more often found downtown (note the Tibetan shop). Even the beloved downtown Israeli eatery Rectangles - which closed its East Village location last year - has just reopened on the Upper East Side, where it bustles nightly.

"I've lived in New York City for 24 years, the bulk of it downtown, and I just moved uptown yesterday," says Frederick Lesort, owner of the eponymous uptown private club and a newly opened restaurant on Madison Avenue.

"I love the luxury of living next to Central Park," he rhapsodizes. "I love the style, the elegance, the architecture. People uptown make more of an effort to get dressed up; uptown is a bit more civilized on the weekends. I would never go out downtown from Thursday night through the weekend - someone described it as Six Flags Great Adventure."

Lesort - who also moved to be closer to his two establishments - also believes it's easier to cultivate and keep a clientele uptown, because people care less about the ephemeral heat of a place than how they're treated and the quality of service.

"Uptown may not be the trendiest crowd, but it's a much better clientele," he says. "It's more faithful. You don't have to be the hottest, trendiest restaurant. You just have to take care of people. The social aspect of it is not so crucial. But downtown, a place has to be trendy - and even if it is, within three months that's over, and it has to close."

But for some transplants, the Upper East Side's crucial flaw is precisely the lack of any discernible nightlife. Ex-Williamsburg resident Hooks says he does everything uptown - but socialize.

"I don't want to see guys in khakis getting loud over sports," he says. Instead, he cabs down to the Lower East Side to hang out at stalwarts like Max Fish or Pianos or The Hat - although he's nevertheless likely to run into his domestic-beer-drinking, khaki-wearing Upper East Side brethren down there on Friday and Saturday nights.

"It's like Disneyland - it looks like the kids from the bar on 86th Street just came down and took it over," he says.

"A friend of mine who was visiting was so disappointed. He was like, 'There used to be so many cool dive bars down here.' But you know - and take this with a grain of salt - all the cool kids moved to Williamsburg."

"If you want to grab a drink with a friend, you either wind up at a really expensive hotel bar or some sports bar on Second Avenue with no ambience," laments 33-year-old Kate Igel, who moved, reluctantly, to the Upper East Side after getting priced out of the West Village.

She did not opt for Williamsburg, she says, because "I'm not hipster-y enough. There is an Upper East Side element to me. I'm slightly preppy. I'm from Connecticut."

Igel says the bulk of her friends live downtown, and she always commutes to see them, not the other way around - and she doesn't blame them.

But on her visit to the West Village Tuesday night, Igel says she was shocked by the amount of garbage - "I forgot about the overflowing trash cans" - and still can't get over the inflated real estate.

"Sporadically, I'd go look at other places downtown, but I'd get so depressed. I saw this one place on Cornelia Street that was a dump. I have a beautiful, rent-stabilized onebedroom on 70th and Lex that I can afford on a teacher's salary.

"I live near the park, which I really missed. I have all the conveniences of life here."

That said, Iger freely admits that she'd love to move back downtown.

"I'd do it in a heartbeat," she says. "I never thought I would end up here."

---

UPPER EAST SIDE (Tale of the Tape)

Average 1br rent: $2,171

Weekend scene: Empty, with most natives in the Hamptons and chic inhabitants at the Met or in Central Park

Nightclubs: '80s-era decadence of plush, members-only club Frederick's

Famous residents: Vera Wang, Aerin Lauder (left)

Crucial difference: Shuns trendiness to the point of crushing boredom

Common satorial challenge: Tyranny of the Gap

DOWNTOWN

Average 1br rent: $2,213*

Weekend scene: Overrun with fanny-pack-wearing tourists and inebriated bridge-and-tunnelers

Nightclubs: Bottle service for tacky teen tarts and models at Butter, Marquee, Cain

Famous residents: Olsen twins, Chloe Sevigny (right)

Crucial difference: Embraces trendiness to the point of crushing boredom

Common satorial challenge: Tyranny of the white belt

*In the East Village. Rental figures from Citi Habitats
Posted by: Carla at June 26, 2005 11:31 AM

I totally called this shit. I knew once I moved to the UES, it would become hot(t).

Yorkville is the new Williamsburg, without all the pretentious and desperate trendy people of gentrified Brooklyn.

And Michael and I are living la-harge.

(Don't hate)
Posted by: Art at June 27, 2005 10:07 AM

art, i'd be living large, too, if i had your job.

also, the article sort of says that the ues is still lame. it's just that downtown has become unbearably hip.

ahhhhh, the joys of brooklyn.
Posted by: Anna at June 27, 2005 11:12 AM

Posted on: 2006/8/4 18:21
Top


Re: Study: Diversity rises in suburbs - whites increasing in urban areas.
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


Speaking of whites in urban areas, check out this article about hipsters in SoBro.

Posted on: 2006/8/4 17:11
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Home away from home
Home away from home


Might I point out that a driveway takes 10 feet of curb while a car takes 20 feet. A 2 car driveway, while ugly, would actually add 1 new parking spot to the street total. Of course 2 of those might be empty but unavailable some percentage of the time, but that would coincide with the times it's easy to find a spot anyway.

Much of San Francisco's lowrise areas (and much infill in Hoboken and Downtown) have garages at streetfront with no setback, and the neighborhoods are quite beautiful. I would far favor that plan over setbacks with driveways in front.

Is the complete text of the R1 revision available anywhere? I'm sure there's blocks where R1 is perfect to preserve their character, but there's lots of blocks currently zoned R1 that are being vandalized by that zoning, like rows of 4 floor brick apartment houses with 20 foot shorter setback unattached 2 families jammed in.

Posted on: 2006/8/4 17:10
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


That is not good, in Boston you have whole historic victorian neighborhoods where the landlords paved over the front yards to make parking. Also, this will only make the Asthma problem here much worse. It will lower property values. I think having parking garages makes alot more sense.

Posted on: 2006/8/4 17:04
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


The proposed amendments are a truly bad idea. Who came up with them?

Posted on: 2006/8/4 17:03
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Newbie
Newbie


Is there a map somewhere online that lays out where the R1 zones are?

Posted on: 2006/8/4 16:26
Top


Re: COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Home away from home
Home away from home


I agree I hope this doesn't happen! I also think it would be great to stop any new construction from making a parking garage on the first floor.

What a backwards idea!

Posted on: 2006/8/4 16:19
Top


COMING SOON: A Sea of Concrete
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


As you know, we have a parking problem in Jersey City: the demand far exceeds the available space. Unfortunately, our City Council is now considering the merits of an ill-conceived approach to address this issue – the R1 Zoning Amendments.

The proposed amendments would change the area’s largest zoning category, the R1 zone (areas with predominantly 1- and 2-family homes). If the amendments are approved, many residential areas will be profoundly altered. Our neighborhood will become a sea of concrete, with cars as the dominant visual element in our front yards.

Rather than solve the parking problem, the zoning changes will:

• Decrease onstreet parking by allowing any home with 15 Ft in front of it to create front yard parking.

• Trade onstreet parking that any resident can use for private parking that only an individual homeowner can use.

• Blight the streetscape by encouraging homeowners to cut down trees and pave over front yards to make way for parked cars.

• Create a safety hazard for pedestrians using the sidewalk and drivers who must back out into oncoming traffic.

The changes will also eliminate green space, 10 feet at a time, by reducing the rear yard setback to 20 feet from 30 feet. This means less privacy for you and your family.

By working together, we can tell the Mayor and City Council that this is not what we want for Jersey City. Will you join us?

To email or fax the Mayor and Council go to:

http://actionstudio.org/?go=2373&i=KjsmUjddXDMiUywlWlMgICAK

Please urge them to vote NO on the R1 Zoning Amendments. (You can also cut and paste the address into your browser)

Two upcoming meetings will decide the future appearance and function of our neighborhoods. Please attend the City Council meeting on Wednesday, August 16th at 10AM at the Mary McCloud Bethune Life Center, 140 Martin Luther King Drive where the vote will be held and/or the Planning Board hearing on August 8th at 5:30PM at City Hall, 280 Grove Street.

The summer is a difficult time to take action – and the city is counting on that. Please click on the link above to email or fax the Mayor and Council to urge them to vote NO on the R1 Zoning Amendments and urge your friends and neighbors to do the same by forwarding this message to them.

Thank you for your support in saving our neighborhoods!

Sincerely,

Becky Hoffman
Riverview Neighborhood Association

PS: Flyers and other information about the proposed zoning changes can be viewed and downloaded at:

www.savethepalisades.org/pages/zoning.html

Help get the word out.

Posted on: 2006/8/4 16:05
Top


Re: Study: Diversity rises in suburbs - whites increasing in urban areas.
Home away from home
Home away from home


I think you are talking about the "whites only" policy of the early 50's Levittown

Here is a ten year old NYTimes article

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage ... 731F93BA15751C1A961958260

Posted on: 2006/8/4 15:42
Top


Re: Study: Diversity rises in suburbs - whites increasing in urban areas.
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


Most of the "minority" suburbs int Nassau county have been around since the 1960's, and they were delibratly created as "minority" suburbs, by the real estate companies and authorites back in the '60s.


Quote:

AlanSommerman wrote:
Thanks for posting - this stuff fascinates me. The questions that remain to be answered for me are: are we creating minority suburbs (Nassau County certainly has them), are the "benefits" of the suburbs like better schools and less crime being left behind as well, etc. There is also the issue of low life developers who lure people out to the burbs with unrealistically low cost of living expectations and shoddy product. The Poconos have this problem - large number of foreclosures among minorities coupled with enormously long commutes that have impacted family life.

Posted on: 2006/8/4 13:12
Top


Re: Jersey City prostitute and murder suspect advertised sex services on craigslist
Home away from home
Home away from home


Wow, this is indeed a parent's worst nightmare. I feel for her family and friends. I hope Riordan and Coleman get the maximum sentence

Posted on: 2006/8/4 10:29
Top


Re: Mapping Crime in Ward E - Steven Fulop
Home away from home
Home away from home


I think you meant to say

3. Yuppies using dead-end street as a private park


Quote:

Ross_Ewage wrote:

3. Yuppies using dead-end street as park....

Posted on: 2006/8/4 10:14
Top


Re: Mapping Crime in Ward E - Steven Fulop
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


Quote:

chill57 wrote:
how about a map like this one that several users can update.

take a look http://quikmaps.com/show/6636


You'd better have a lot of virtual pins for all the crimes reported here:

1. Youths wearing long white t-shirts, probably gangmembers
2. Youths not wearing long white t-shirts, probably gangmembers
3. Yuppies using dead-end street as park, probably gangmembers
4. Dog off the leash, children menaced
5. Children off the leash, dogs menaced
6. CRAPKINS!!
7. Happy Hour at LITM not happy today
8. Lamb at "It's Greek to Me" was off
9. Black men looking at white women, suspect hate crime
10. White men looking at black women, suspect hate crime
11. White men looking at white men, don't know what to think, but strangely arousing
12. Neighbor's grill too close to my condo (but more importantly, he's NOT cooking Kobe beef)
13. Jersey City apparently not Georgetown, the suburbs, or Australia
14. Mayor drinking beer, DOMESTIC GODDAMN BEER!
15. Steve Fulop apparently can't fly
16. That cute girl in the office won't go out with me

The list of crimes goes on...

Posted on: 2006/8/4 10:02
Top


Re: Jersey City prostitute and murder suspect advertised sex services on craigslist
Home away from home
Home away from home



Posted on: 2006/8/4 10:00
Top


Re: Best things to order at the Vietnamese place on Newark
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


Quote:

xtine wrote:
Grilled beef with lemongrass on vermicelli is my personal fav (along with the pho, cha gio, summer rolls, etc.)


Mine Too!! I also love the summer rolls and the grill yourself stuff.

mr e-eff swears by the No 1 Extra Big Bowl, and his skinny ass eats the entire thing in one sitting!

Posted on: 2006/8/4 9:45
... When life gives you lemons - Make Lemontini's!!

Dennis Deyoung is a musical genius
Top


Re: Best things to order at the Vietnamese place on Newark
Newbie
Newbie


Nha Trang is one of best Vietamese places I have ever been.

I always order Pho and they never fail.

I often see natives doing somekind of DIY grilling but I have no idea what they are. Would love to try.


My Best Choice is ICE COFFEE!

I know it's not a meal. But if you like coffee. You'd LOVE their coffee. Handsdown BEST ICED COFFEE EVER! If you have 4 bucks to spend on Starbucks Iced Mocha whatever, get 2 cups of the best coffee creation you can ever lay your hands on from NHA TRANG!

Posted on: 2006/8/4 9:37
Top



TopTop
« 1 ... 7658 7659 7660 (7661) 7662 7663 7664 ... 7784 »






Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!



LicenseInformation | AboutUs | PrivacyPolicy | Faq | Contact


JERSEY CITY LIST - News & Reviews - Jersey City, NJ - Copyright 2004 - 2017