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Post your Pimp Sightings Here
Home away from home
Home away from home


HAVE YOU SEEN THIS PIMP?

Resized Image
(Sorry for the unclear photo, but I was lucky I could whip my camera phone out that quickly!)

In case you can't tell, that's traffic-cone-orange FUR head to toe!

Dojo-mojo had a sighting in a pastel pink get-up nearly two months ago, and got a much clearer photo.

One JC friend reports seeing him in a black and white zebra outift, another spotted him in purple - but there has been no photographic evidence.

Let's stay on top of this. Who is he? Where is he going? What colors have you seen? Will he continue to wear fur all summer?

Post your PIMP SIGHTINGS here.

Bonus points if you can get your photo WITH him!

Posted on: 2006/4/8 11:53
Top


Jersey City PAL gets $15,000 anti-gang grant
Home away from home
Home away from home


Asbury Park PAL gets $15,000 anti-gang grant
Posted by the Asbury Park Press on 04/7/06
BY NANCY SHIELDS
COASTAL MONMOUTH BUREAU

ASBURY PARK — The city's Police Athletic League is one of six local chapters in the state to receive $15,000 for anti-gang activities, the state PAL has announced.

The funds are to be used to expand existing recreational and athletic programs and to incorporate education about the dangers of associating with gangs into those programs.

The other five municipalities to receive similar grants are Elizabeth, Hoboken, Jersey City, Rahway and Vineland.

Posted on: 2006/4/8 0:55
Top


Corzine asks court's permission to cut aid to some poor schools - Newark, Jersey City & NewBrunswick
Home away from home
Home away from home


Corzine asks court's permission to freeze aid to some poor schools

April 7, 2006, 5:24 PM EDT

TRENTON, N.J. -- For the second year in a row, New Jersey is moving to freeze aid to some of the state's poorest school districts.

Gov. Jon S. Corzine announced Friday that he had asked the Attorney General's Office to request permission from the state Supreme Court to keep aid in check.

In a series of rulings known as the Abbott v. Burke cases, the state's high court has required the state government to give extra money and other help to school districts in 31 poor cities. Holding spending for those districts in check requires the court's approval.

In Corzine's proposed $30.9 billion state budget, the districts would get a total of $4 billion _ an increase of about $140 million over the current year.

But some schools with especially low local tax rates _ including Newark, Jersey City and New Brunswick _ would have aid cut. To make up the difference, those districts would have to raise taxes.

Most of the state's roughly 600 school districts have been told their aid from the state will not change for the 2006-07 school year.

Friday's move comes one year after Gov. Richard J. Codey froze the aid to most of the poor districts.

"I have called upon state officials at all levels to reduce expenditures and to find ways to do more with less," Corzine said in a statement. "They have been fully responsive to this call. I expect nothing less from local municipal and school officials."

Corzine said holding back school spending this year does not mean he's not committed to improving the poor schools.

Education advocates, such as the Education Law Center, which sued for more help for the poor districts, have called for Corzine to reverse course and offer more aid to schools.

Posted on: 2006/4/8 0:52
Top


Cities Move To Prevent Rail Attacks
Home away from home
Home away from home


Cities Move To Prevent Rail Attacks

JERSEY CITY, N.J., April 7, 2006
Written by Alexandra Marks - Christian Science Monitor.

"In their mind, it's better for the public to be at very high risk and in blissful ignorance than to do something about it."
Fred Millar, consultant

Boston officials envision keeping rail cars carrying hazardous chemicals at least 10 miles away unless the city is their destination.

A plan in Chicago would prohibit such tanker cars in its downtown Loop. In Cleveland, city officials are considering banning them near Lake Erie, water treatment plants, and crowded neighborhoods.

Transport of these chemicals presents one of the knottiest public policy problems in the effort to protect the nation's cities from terrorist attack. Federal law requires railroads to carry such chemicals, which are used in manufacturing, water-purification systems, and wastewater-treatment plants.

But with no federal regulations for securing the transport of these chemicals, The District of Columbia has enacted rules of its own and at least five other cities are considering them. These moves have drawn a sharp rebuke from industry and federal officials, who say such piecemeal efforts are misguided. Since 9/11, they point out, railroads have fortified rail yards and worked with the chemical industry to conceal where and when these tanker cars pass near or through cities.

The threat looms large. Government studies suggest that the explosion of one tanker car carrying, say, chlorine would cause up to 100,000 deaths in a densely populated area.

So Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Cleveland, and Chicago have proposed ordinances requiring that such deadly chemicals be rerouted around them unless they're destined for the cities themselves. The fact that the rail industry, with federal support, has sued the District of Columbia over its law has not deterred them.

"The federal government says, 'We preempt the field,' but their preemption is abdication because they're not doing anything. They're letting the railroads determine the routes," says Stuart Greenberg of the Cuyahoga County Emergency Planning Committee in Cleveland. "Either we need to allow local jurisdictions to exercise their obligation to protect the public, or we need a comprehensive federal routing system designed by a neutral party."

Critics' main concern is that it's too easy to gain access to the tanker cars. A few miles from midtown Manhattan, for example, a chain-link fence topped with razor-sharp wire surrounds a rail yard in Jersey City, N.J. "No Trespassing" signs abound. But it's easy to step through some weeds and onto the tracks that lead directly into the fenced-in rail yard. No one stopped a reporter when she approached those tracks or tracks in two other areas where tanker cars sometimes travel.

Rail officials contend that's not a fair representation of how easy it would be to target dangerous cars. First, they represent a small percentage of the nation's rail cargo, they say. Of 1.7 million carloads of hazardous materials transported each year, only about 100,000 contain the most dangerous toxic inhalants like chlorine and anhydrous ammonia. Second, the industry has increased the safeguards on information about where and when such shipments travel. Third, and most important, rerouting toxic chemicals would cause them to travel longer routes on less well maintained rural tracks, increasing the risk of accidents.

"You're compromising safety in the name of security, which is not a good idea or public policy," says Peggy Wilhide, of the Association of American Railroads in Washington, D.C.

Critics counter that an accident or an attack in a less populated area would create far less damage, mitigating the trade-off. They also say the federal government is intentionally downplaying the risks.

"In their mind, it's better for the public to be at very high risk and in blissful ignorance than to do something about it," says Fred Millar, a consultant to the Washington, D.C., city council.

In response, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Transportation last Friday issued "recommended security action items" for the rail transport of "toxic inhalation hazard materials." It calls for putting one person in charge of these shipments; restricting access to information about them; and ensuring regular communications with federal, state, and local emergency responders. But the memo's second sentence reads: "All measures are voluntary." That prompted an angry reaction from some on Capitol Hill.

These "are the latest sign of how this administration would sooner jeopardize homeland security than ruffle the feathers of a big corporation," says Rep. Edward Markey (D) of Massachusetts.

Federal transportation and homeland security officials defend the guidelines as just a first step that can be implemented right away. They also say the guidelines don't preclude future regulations. "Our goal is to balance safety and security, rerouting doesn't mitigate the risk, it simply moves it to another location," says Darrin Kayser, spokesman for the Transportation Security Administration.

Rail officials contend this is one of the most difficult and expensive security problem it faces. Indeed, Ms. Wilhide says the railroads would rather not carry such dangerous cargo at all. Recently, the AAR came out in favor of industry switching to less dangerous chemicals where possible, a move that puts it at odds with its customer, the chemical industry.

"If we had our choice we wouldn't move it because it constitutes less than 1/10th of our profit and 99 percent of our risk," says Wilhide. "We'd at least like a clear set of guidelines."

Posted on: 2006/4/8 0:34
Top


Manzo trying to head off school tax hike
Home away from home
Home away from home


Manzo trying to head off school tax hike
Friday, April 07, 2006
By KEN THORBOURNE
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Assemblyman Lou Manzo says he is trying to save the average Jersey City property owner about $60 on their annual tax bill, but it's not clear if he will be successful.

When the state Department of Education officials announced school aid figures two weeks ago, they had slashed aid to Jersey City by roughly $7.5 million for the upcoming school year, from $430.4 million to $422.8 million.

The school district won't feel the cut, though; state officials also ordered local officials to raise the school tax levy by an amount equal to the state aid reduction, which translates to a $90 tax hit for a homeowner whose property is assessed at $100,000, city officials have said.

Manzo's position is that the state doesn't have authority to impose higher taxes in a school district with an elected board. Voters in what's known as a "Type 2" district should get the chance to vote on the increased tax levy, he said.

That vote should take place on April 18, the date of the school board elections, Manzo said. But since those ballots are already at the printer, Manzo says the state should bite the bullet and cough up the $7.5 million.

However, the state has a different opinion. Even though Jersey City has an elected board, which would normally make it a "Type 2" district, it's really a state-run school district, and therefore a different set of rules apply, says Department of Education spokesman Richard Vespucci.

In a state-operated school district, the DOE approves the budget, then certifies a tax rate with the county, Vespucci said.

Manzo asked Albert Porroni, legislative counsel for the Office of Legislative Services, to look into the matter, who said he'll have a response by the end of the week.

The increased school taxes would not kick in until August, said Tax Assessor Maureen Cosgrove.

Posted on: 2006/4/8 0:31
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Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Newbie
Newbie


{{{{Since 2003, the average sale price of a home in Hudson County has soared by 25 percent - from $287,000 to $408,000, according to the Liberty Board of Realtors. The number of homes sold annually during the same period has also increased by 25 percent, from 4,600 to 6,100 last year.}}}}

What can you get for $408,000 these days??? Not much. You will be limited to one & two bedroom condos. I have to laugh when I see what is listed at $499,000 in Manhattan. Usually a tiny studio thats half the size of what I am paying $720 a month in rent for in Queens.

{{{Those kinds of numbers have residents concerned about their ability to continue living here.}}}}

Not only housing prices but also real estate taxes, payroll taxes, and the highest auto insurance & utility rates in the country.

{{{{In a March 2003 poll, 44 percent of the respondents said they have lived in the county for at least 20 years, and 64 percent said they expected to live in the county for at least another five years.}}}}

I hope those 64% like riding on overcrowded subway & PATH trains, paying close to 30% per pay period in witholding taxes, and spending $2,000 or more on housing costs. Not to mention again, the highest car insurance & utility rates in the country.

Its amazing, it seems like everyone in Manhattan, Hoboken & Jersey City these days is under 30, lived in the area for less than 5 years, but have tons of cash available to pay the ridiculous prices and rents being asked.


{{{However, in the most recent poll, nearly 48 percent of the people said that the rising cost of living in the county may force them to leave.}}}}

Contrary to popular belief there is a large country west of the Delaware river that is doing pretty well and where people are not constantly miserable, not rude & hostile toward each other, don't need to live in a constant police state, and don't have to work 12 hours a day in some corporate office for a $75,000 a year salary.


{{{Of the respondents, 52 percent said they were renters and 40 percent said they own their homes.}}}

Buying does not pay in this market especially with rising interest rates and with condo common charges, real estate taxes & or maintenance (for co-ops) easily negating any savings of buying versus renting.

{{{{The county-wide poll had a plurality of respondents - 42 percent - who said they were from Jersey City and made more than $30,000 annually.}}}}

How does someone who makes $30,000 or $50,000 survive these days???

{{{"I often sit people down and show them how they can afford the house, but it takes a little sacrifice, like entertaining at home instead of going out," Hottendorf said.}}}

Sure, we are supposed to listed to a real estate agent about how much house we can afford to buy. They won't be there when your I/O payment jumps $800 or more when the rate is reset or when your home is foreclosed upon.

Posted on: 2006/4/7 23:41
Top


Actions Taken Planning Board Meeting 3/28
Home away from home
Home away from home


JERSEY CITY PLANNING BOARD
PUBLIC NOTICE
REGULAR MEETING
Please take notice the Planning Board took the following action at the Regular Meeting of March 28,
2006:
1. Call to Order
2. Sunshine Announcement
3. Roll Call
4. Correspondence
5. Old Business:
6. Review and Discussion of the proposed St. Francis Hospital Adaptive Re-Use Redevelopment
Plan. Formal action may be taken.
Approved with conditions and recommended to City Council for Adoption..
7. Section 31 Review. Municipal Parking Lot, Marin & Montgomery Streets.
Carried to April 4, 2006 meeting.
8. Cases: P05-139 Administrative Amendment
Applicant: 19 Prescott LLC
Attorney: William R. Lindsley
Address: 19-25 Prescott St.
Block: 1925 Lot: 10, 11, 12
Zone: R-1,One and Two Family Housing
Description: two new two-family homes and one new one-family home
Variances: Change internal stairwells from spiral stairs to traditional stairs in two-family
homes only. Application was previously approved on January 10, 2006.
Decision: Approved.
9. New Business
10. Review and discussion of the proposed Forrest & Bergen Study Area. Formal action may be
taken.
Approved and recommended to City Council for Adoption.
11. Amendment to Green Villa Redevelopment Plan Area as per Forrest Bergen Study Area.
Approved and recommended to City Council for Adoption.
12. Case: P05-132 Preliminary & Final Major Site Plan with ‘c’ variances
Applicant: John Crowley
Attorney: Charles Harrington
Address: 165-169 Academy Street
Block: 1884 Lot: P, Q, Q.1
Zone: O/R - Office Residential
Description: New 9-story building with 33 residential units and 34 garage parking spaces
Variances: Lot area, lot width, rear yard, side yard, lot coverage, building coverage, parking
aisle width
Decision: Approved with conditions.
13. Cases: P05-167 Minor Subdivision with “c” variances
Applicant: Luis Garcia
Attorney: Pro Se
Address: 57-59 Wallis Ave.
Block: 1616 Lot: 24, 25
Zone: R-1 One and two family housing
Description: Subdivision of existing lot into two undersized lots of 2,000 sf for the
construction of two new two family homes
Variances: lot area (both lots), lot width (both lots)
Decision: Approved with conditions.
14. Case: P05-150 Minor Subdivision
Applicant: Summit Avenue Homes, LLC
Attorney: Eugene Squeo
Address: 195-197 Van Horne St.
Block: 2041 Lot: X & Y
Zone: Morris Canal
Description: Re-subdivision of two lots to create two new conforming lots of 2,500 sf and 2,800
sf.
Decision: Approved.
15. Case: P06-014 Preliminary & Final Major Site Plan
Applicant: Newport Associates Development Company
Attorney: Charles Harrington
Address: Marin Boulevard & 18 Street th
Block: 20 Lot: 4.01 Block: 19 Lot: A.12
Zone: Newport
Description: Addition of 42 parking spaces
Decision: Approved.
Planning Board Meeting
March 28, 2006
Page 2
16. Case: P05-026 Preliminary & Final Major Site Plan
Applicant: New Cingular Wireless PCS, LLC
Attorney: Judith Babinski
Address: 101 Linden Avenue
Block: 1507 Lot: 20&21
Zone: Greenville Industrial Redevelopment Plan
Description: New cellular phone monopole.
Decision: Approved with condition.
17. Case: P05-162 Minor Site Plan with “c” variance
Applicant: New Cingular Wireless PCS, LLC
Attorney: Judith Babinski
Address: 487 Bramhall Avenue
Block: 1963 Lot: 15, 16, 17.T
Zone: R-1, One and two family housing
Description: New cellular phone antennas.
Variances: Telecommunication equipment on a roof less than 60 feet in height.
Decision: Approved with condition.
18. Case: P05-130 Minor Site Plan with “c” variance
Applicant: Omnipoint Communications, INC
Attorney: Dean Stamos
Address: 1584 JFK Boulevard
Block: 1376 Lot: 88.A
Zone: NC, Neighborhood Commercial
Description: New cellular phone antennas.
Variances: Telecommunication equipment on a roof less than 60 feet in height.
Decision: Approved with condition.
19. Case: P05-089 Preliminary and Final Major Subdivision / Variances/ Deviations
Applicant: Dinh and Phu Nguyen
Attorney: Jon Campbell
Address: 113-119 Harrison Ave./632-634 Communipaw Ave.
Block: 1931 Lot: 7, 8, 9, H2
Zone: R-1, Residential and Monticello Avenue Redevelopment Area
Description: Subdivision of four lots into five new lots for a commercial lot and two new 2-
family residential buildings. Split zone project with frontage on two streets.
Variances & Deviations: Lot area (4 lots), lot depth (5 lots)
Carried, No date specific.
20. Case: P05-072 Preliminary and Final Major Site Plan / Variances/ Deviations
Applicant: Dinh and Phu Nguyen
Attorney: Jon Campbell
Address: 113-119 Harrison Ave./632-634 Communipaw Ave.
Block: 1931 Lot: 7, 8, 9, H2
Zone: R-1, Residential and Monticello Avenue Redevelopment Area
Description: New 2,073sf commercial space with parking along Communipaw Avenue and two
new 2-family homes fronting on Harrison Avenue.
Variances & Deviations: side yard (one lot), rear yard (5 lots), building coverage (2 lots),
lot coverage (one lot), front yard parking
Carried, No date specific.
21. Case: P06-011 Preliminary and Final Site Plan with Deviation
Applicant: Heidi Curko and John Colangelo
Attorney: Jon Campbell
Address: 59 ½ Lafayette St.
Block: 2051 Lot: P
Zone: Morris Canal Redevelopment Plan
Description: 2-story addition to the rear of an existing house
Deviations: Rear yard
Decision: Approved.
22. Memorialized the following resolutions, available for review at the Office of City Planning, 30
Montgomery Street, 14 flr., Suite # 1400, Jersey City, NJ: th
(1) Resolution of the Planning Board of the City of Jersey City Approving Amended Preliminary Site
Plan # P00-116.1 submitted by Vector Urban Renewal Associates I, L.P. and Vector Urban Associates
II, LP(328-342 Washington Street).
(2) Resolution of the Planning Board of the City of Jersey City Denying Preliminary and Final Site
Plan with “c” variances # P05-142 submitted by York Street Properties, LLC (102 York Street).
23. Executive Session, as needed, to discuss litigation, personnel or other matters
24. Adjournment
JOHN CARDWELL, CHAIRMAN, PLANNING BOARD

Posted on: 2006/4/5 16:12
Top


Re: Need Help With Oil Tank Removal - Recommendations?
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


The company the sellers used in our case was:

Tadco Engineering And Environmental Service LLC
59 Bleecker St # A
Jersey City, NJ 07307
201-222-5322

Posted on: 2006/4/5 8:25
Top


Re: Police Brutality Allegations from Filipino Community
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Quote:

jc_insomniac wrote:
I guess no one ever mentored that woman when she was a child, or told her "I love you."

C'mon, Newsboy, where are you? You should be all over this one!



He should at least be carrying enough money to break a hundred dollar bill. It must have been a slow night.

Posted on: 2006/4/4 17:46
Top


Re: Police Brutality Allegations from Filipino Community
Home away from home
Home away from home


I guess no one ever mentored that woman when she was a child, or told her "I love you."

C'mon, Newsboy, where are you? You should be all over this one!

Posted on: 2006/4/4 17:21
Top


Re: Hudson residents say: Build smaller
Home away from home
Home away from home


It's an easy bet that most of Hudsons residential areas are already zoned for 1 or 2 already.

It's ridiculous opinion polls like this that result in reduced density zoning that won't allow a new infill 3 or 4 family in a older row of them, resulting in a disjointed looking ugly block like mine. Suburban zoning for an existing rowhouse district is vandalism.

Say what you will about Hoboken, but they don't force the aesthetically struggling areas outside the historic districts to look even crappier. The new infill fits in as far as setbacks and density.

Posted on: 2006/4/4 12:51
Top


Re: Hudson residents say: Build smaller
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Quote:
A majority of Hudson County residents want more single-and two-family homes

So, the majority of our county wants more urban sprawl?

Posted on: 2006/4/4 11:33
Top


Re: Hudson residents say: Build smaller
Home away from home
Home away from home


"While developers are having little trouble filling their high-rise condominium projects - sometimes selling out even before a shovel hits the ground..."

Is this entirely true or just based on hype?

Posted on: 2006/4/4 10:47
Top


Hudson residents say: Build smaller
Home away from home
Home away from home


Hudson residents say: Build smaller
Tuesday, April 04, 2006
By JARRETT RENSHAW
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

While developers are having little trouble filling their high-rise condominium projects - sometimes selling out even before a shovel hits the ground - residents are clamoring for something smaller.

A majority of Hudson County residents want more single-and two-family homes built in the region, and fewer of the condos and luxury homes that are currently driving the real estate market, according to a Jersey Journal/New Jersey City University poll.

Less than 8 percent of the respondents said they want more condos built in their neighborhoods, while a whopping 60 percent of the respondents said they want more one-or two-family homes.

A little more than 13 percent want luxury homes; just under 4 percent want stores; 4 percent want apartments and 2 percent want offices.

The backlash against condos and luxury homes isn't just a "not-in-my-backyard" phenomenon: The results were almost identical when respondents were asked what they'd like to see built elsewhere in Hudson County.

So many residents preferring small-scale development over huge projects might pose serious problems for local politicians, according to the poll's supervisors, Bruce Chadwick of the English Department and Fran Moran of the political science department.

So, it's not surprising that a majority of residents - 58 percent - believe government officials have a different opinion than they do when it comes to a development wish list.

Less than 17 percent of the respondents felt government officials shared their opinion and 26 percent said they didn't know either way.

The current and future development landscape in Jersey City, the county's largest city, shows the disconnect between government officials and residents.

There are currently more than 90 projects that are either proposed or under way in Jersey City, according to the city's Division of Planning. The overwhelming majority of the projects are high-density, condo developments that will produce more than 9,000 total units when complete.

Joe Seneca, professor of economics and politics at Rutgers University's Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, says the pressure of high real estate properties is sending the market sky-high - literally and figuratively.

"In a hot real estate market like Hudson County, land becomes so valuable that density becomes highly lucrative and developers build upward to take advantage," Seneca said, leading to ever-taller buildings - and fewer of the small one-and two-family homes that residents evidently prefer.

Seneca added that while condos are often out of the price range of the average buyer, they can also help stabilize the market.

"Much of this is dictated by the law of supply and demand," Seneca said. "The condos add to the supply of the market and reduce the demand, and can lower prices overall."

Posted on: 2006/4/4 10:18
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Re: Police Brutality Allegations from Filipino Community
Home away from home
Home away from home


Some people don't run to the cops or take any cabbie's crap.


---------------------------------------------------------


After the cab driver said he couldn't break a $100 bill, a young woman decided instead of paying him, she'd pull a gun on him and slash his seat with a knife, Jersey City police said.

The driver for the Journal Square Cab Company picked up a woman in Journal Square shortly before 6 a.m. yesterday, according to police reports.

He drove her to Wilkinson and Bergen avenues, police said, and the woman tried to pay with a $100 bill.

He told her he didn't have change to break the bill. A few minutes later, he said he heard the click of a gun behind him.

The woman yelled she wasn't going to pay him, slashed the seat, then left, police said. No money was taken, and the driver was not hurt.

Posted on: 2006/4/3 22:58
Top


Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Home away from home
Home away from home


I remember when Kraftwerk sent robots to tour for themselves! haha
http://jan.moesen.nu/media/photos/2004/03/kraftwerk-in-de-ab/


Hey I know everyone has done this but I was just looking at houses for sale between $10,000 and $90,000 nationwide on ebay pretty interesting.
http://realestate.search.ebay.com/ws/ ... &sacat=12605&sofindtype=1

Posted on: 2006/4/3 21:56

Edited by GrovePath on 2006/4/3 22:12:26
Edited by GrovePath on 2006/4/3 22:15:09
Top


Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

GrovePath wrote:
And for live music...

Resized Image

Quote:

NNJR wrote:
Quote:
(gee, I wonder who's gonna sell all of you your coffee and newspaper in the morning.)


Robots of course.


We're charging our battery
And now we're full of energy
We are the robots

We're functioning automatik
And we are dancing mechanik
We are the robots

Ja tvoi sluga (=I'm your slave)
Ja tvoi Rabotnik robotnik (=I'm your worker)

We are programmed just to do
anything you want us to
we are the robots

We're functioning automatic
and we are dancing mechanic
we are the robots

We are the robots

Posted on: 2006/4/3 21:39
Top


Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

NNJR wrote:
Quote:
(gee, I wonder who's gonna sell all of you your coffee and newspaper in the morning.)


Robots of course.


Nah, they're already at work in the offices, and post here during the day

Resized Image

Posted on: 2006/4/3 19:56
Resized Image
Help US Sue Spectra! Join OR Donate!
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Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Home away from home
Home away from home


And for live music...

Resized Image

Quote:

NNJR wrote:
Quote:
(gee, I wonder who's gonna sell all of you your coffee and newspaper in the morning.)


Robots of course.

Posted on: 2006/4/3 19:55
Top


Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Home away from home
Home away from home


I hope they aren't named H.A.L.

Resized Image

Posted on: 2006/4/3 19:51
Top


Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:
(gee, I wonder who's gonna sell all of you your coffee and newspaper in the morning.)


Robots of course.

Posted on: 2006/4/3 19:35
Top


Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Home away from home
Home away from home


So basically, the entire Eastern Seaboard will eventually be populated exclusively by rich people (gee, I wonder who's gonna sell all of you your coffee and newspaper in the morning.)

Posted on: 2006/4/3 18:19
Top


Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Quite a regular
Quite a regular


Quote:

DoggieDew wrote:
The key to successfully cashing out is not to buy back into the same area for which you will pay dearly, but to move to other parts of the country where both cost of living and quality of life are more reasonable, affordable, and enjoyable.

I made my money in Hudson County, now I can happily go elsewhere to spend it! Thanks Hudson County for making me rich!!!! See ya'!


Ain't that the truth!!!

Posted on: 2006/4/3 18:04
Top


Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


Other parts of the country have the same problem as the NYC area, like atlanta, LA, Chicago...housing prices have soared there too...
Also, even you move to say North Carolina to have better quality of life, you quickly find out that you live next to a meth lab, you have gangs in the neighborhood, crime is a serious problem, you have break-ins etc.
...the quality of life in Jersey is better in some regards than other parts of the US.
... I would much rather raise a family in Hudson County than say Houston, at least here people are exposed to culture and you have people setting a positive example.

Posted on: 2006/4/3 18:04
Top


Re: Hamilton Park Renovation Community Report
Home away from home
Home away from home


For anyone that could not open the links, the full report can be found here -

http://www.harsimuscove.org/Hamilton%20Park%20Renovation.pdf

Posted on: 2006/4/3 17:42
Top


Re: Home price surge worries longtime residents
Newbie
Newbie


Its the same story all over the NYC metro area. A similar poll was done on Long Island a few months ago, and the results were the same.

The key to successfully cashing out is not to buy back into the same area for which you will pay dearly, but to move to other parts of the country where both cost of living and quality of life are more reasonable, affordable, and enjoyable.

I made my money in Hudson County, now I can happily go elsewhere to spend it! Thanks Hudson County for making me rich!!!! See ya'!

Posted on: 2006/4/3 15:54
Top


Home price surge worries longtime residents
Home away from home
Home away from home


OUT OF CONTROL?
Home price surge worries longtime residents
Monday, April 03, 2006
By JARRETT RENSHAW
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Hudson County home prices are soaring - and while that might be good news for those who are selling, it's a cause for concern for residents who don't want to cash out, according to a new poll by The Jersey Journal/New Jersey City University.

Nearly two-thirds of residents surveyed in the poll said they probably couldn't afford to buy a home in the neighborhood they live in now; less than 30 percent were confident they could.

In addition, more than 70 percent of the respondents think real estate prices in their neighborhood are "too high." Just 5 percent say the prices are too low, and 14 percent say they're "about right."

Since 2003, the average sale price of a home in Hudson County has soared by 25 percent - from $287,000 to $408,000, according to the Liberty Board of Realtors. The number of homes sold annually during the same period has also increased by 25 percent, from 4,600 to 6,100 last year.

Those kinds of numbers have residents concerned about their ability to continue living here.

In a March 2003 poll, 44 percent of the respondents said they have lived in the county for at least 20 years, and 64 percent said they expected to live in the county for at least another five years.

However, in the most recent poll, nearly 48 percent of the people said that the rising cost of living in the county may force them to leave.

"It's a remarkable turnaround in such a short time," wrote the supervisors of the poll, Bruce Chadwick of the English department and Fran Moran of the political science department, in an analysis of the results.

"While residents have told us they enjoy living in Hudson and generally like being here, we see some concern over whether or not the cost of living, particularly the cost of housing and the spill-over effect it has on the cost of economic goods, may make it difficult for them to stay," Chadwick and Moran wrote.

Of the respondents, 52 percent said they were renters and 40 percent said they own their homes.

The county-wide poll had a plurality of respondents - 42 percent - who said they were from Jersey City and made more than $30,000 annually.

Joe Hottendorf, executive vice president of the Liberty Board of Realtors, said there's always anxiety about rising costs in Hudson County, but with a little research, people's fears are eased.

"I often sit people down and show them how they can afford the house, but it takes a little sacrifice, like entertaining at home instead of going out," Hottendorf said.

Posted on: 2006/4/3 10:29
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Re: JERSEY CITY TO JETS: LAND HERE
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

fasteddie wrote:
I am not a big sports guy so here's a question for those that are. I find the nickname "gang green" revolting. Do the Jets encourage its use? I cannot for the life of me imagine why they would want to be associated with such a disease.


You obviously are not aware of their performance last season. . . .

Posted on: 2006/3/31 12:48
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Re: JERSEY CITY TO JETS: LAND HERE
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

Skadave wrote:
The Jets aren't coming here:

http://www.nj.com/news/jjournal/jerse ... 14380013121280.xml&coll=3

I am curious to know how much money was spent to try to get them to come to jersey city, especially when I read things like:
"For several months, Jersey City officials had mounted a campaign to lure Gang Green to a 28-acre site along Caven Point Road, even hosting a posh luncheon for Jets officials two weeks ago at the Liberty House restaurant in Liberty State Park."

This article also takes the cake for most used sport cliches.

I am not a big sports guy so here's a question for those that are. I find the nickname "gang green" revolting. Do the Jets encourage its use? I cannot for the life of me imagine why they would want to be associated with such a disease.

Posted on: 2006/3/31 12:43
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Re: Should Healy resign?
Quite a regular
Quite a regular


Quote:

JCNY wrote:

What happened?



Short answer is that we had 3 mayors in a very short time...Cunningham died in office and then we had Smith for a few months as Acting Mayor and then Healy. Each mayor brought his own cronies in and so the city (and the departments) suffered from a lack of real leadership with all the musical chairs going on with the political shuffling.

At least, that's my take on it.

Posted on: 2006/3/31 12:41
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