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Re: Say Yes to Safe Sidewalks and Say NO to Carports (AGAIN!)
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:
sidewalk curb cuts for driveways create unsafe pedestrian conditions for the young and elderly


won't someone think of the children? Nice one.

Just say what you really think, they look ugly and they jeopardize the already scarce street parking. The old lady & children speech is pathetic.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 19:37
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Re: Say Yes to Safe Sidewalks and Say NO to Carports (AGAIN!)
Home away from home
Home away from home


With all the highrise apartments being built, City Hall might think the only way to deal with the expected demand for on-street parking, is to push resident's cars off the street for visitors and shoppers. Traffic congestion around Grove St PATH will be a pain in the ass, once those apartments above are occupied. Not fogetting the added impact to our pothole riddled streets.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 18:27
My humor is for the silent blue collar majority - If my posts offend, slander or you deem inappropriate and seek deletion, contact the webmaster for jurisdiction.
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Re: Say Yes to Safe Sidewalks and Say NO to Carports (AGAIN!)
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

DanL wrote:
Note received from the Riverivew Neighborhood Assoc.
[...]
Please act and go to Citizenspeak to instantly send a personalized letter to the Mayor and Council telling them you do not want front yard parking in your neighborhood.
[...]

Thank you for taking action!

Becky Hoffman
Riverview Neighborhood Association

email: riverviewneighborhood@comcast.net


Thanks for posting DanL! I just went to Citizenspeak to send my letter to the Mayor and Council and hope others here will do the same.

I also sent this info to the HCA and HPNA asking them to email broadcast this info to their respective members.

Thanks much Becky and to the Riverview Neighborhood Association.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 18:21
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Re: The liquor store building on the corner of Brunswick & Newark Avenue is trying to become 4 stories
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Home away from home


as per the agenda, the only deviation from existing zoning is for parking. if anyone would like me to forward them the agenda, please email me.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 18:10
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Say Yes to Safe Sidewalks and Say NO to Carports (AGAIN!)
Home away from home
Home away from home


Note received from the Riverivew Neighborhood Assoc.

These amendments are simliar to those defeated last year.

In addition to the reasons below, sidewalk curb cuts for driveways create unsafe pedestrian conditions for the young and elderly and can be a traffic safety hazzard on busy streets. I have always found that one of beauties and pleasures of our historic districts is to be able to walk uninterupted by driveways.

Please act and go to Citizenspeak to instantly send a personalized letter to the Mayor and Council telling them you do not want front yard parking in your neighborhood.

--------------------------------------------------

Say NO to Carports (AGAIN!)

May 16, 2007

We need your help. Despite public pressure that led to amendments being defeated last summer, on May 23rd, the City Council will again consider introducing an ordinance that will allow front yard parking (a.k.a. carports) in the R1 (one and two-family) zoning district.

Front Yard parking was allowed prior to 2001 and we are left with many blocks with so many curb cuts there is little, if any, available on-street parking. And, there was no enforcement so many of the driveways are illegal. Why go back to a failed policy?

Take Action

By working together, we can tell the Mayor and City Council that this is not what we want for Jersey City. Ask them to follow the lead of the Planning Board - who unanimously did NOT support this zoning change - and vote this amendment down. go to Citizenspeak to instantly send a personalized letter to the Mayor and Council telling them you do not want front yard parking in your neighborhood. Are there no other creative solutions to help ease parking in Jersey City neighborhoods?

Save Our Neighborhoods

If the amendments are approved, many residential areas will be profoundly altered. Our neighborhood will become a sea of concrete, with cars as the dominant visual element in our front yards, too many curb cuts to mention, and we will lose green space one yard at at time.
Please go to go to Citizenspeak now and then forward this letter to your neighbors and ask them to join this effort.

Thank you for taking action!

Becky Hoffman
Riverview Neighborhood Association

email: riverviewneighborhood@comcast.net

Posted on: 2007/5/19 17:58
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Re: Sex offender working for Bolden Cunningham's senate campaign
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


Quote:

Xerxes wrote:
Gosh,

Without felons, where would Jersey City find people to run for office and manage campaigns...paging Gerry McCann. Sheesh, what's a little sex conviction, fraud, or mob involvement when you're talking about politics in a city with mayors that are jailed or mayors that play in the streets drunk and nude...par for the course.

Welcome to Jersey City!


Aside from the felons, ex-felons, and soon-to-be-felons, this is already a crazy campaign.

Sandy Cunningham, who all but blamed the HCDO for her husband's death and banned Tom DeGise and Harvey Smith from his funeral, is now their poster girl.

Even stranger, Roger Jones, her spokesperson, was the guy who ran the "kindler, gentler Gerry McCann" campaign that got him elected Mayor in 1989.

Even Bob Janiszewski [sp] must be laughing at this one.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 17:40
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Re: Sex offender working for Bolden Cunningham's senate campaign
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Quote:

GrovePath wrote:
Here is the Jersey Journal's article

Sex offender working on Sandy campaign

Saturday, May 19, 2007
By JARRETT RENSHAW
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER [...]


Thanks GrovePath for providing the source of Yvonne's original post thread.

All should be as diligent as GrovePath in always providing, date, writer and media source. Ideally, one should also provide the linking url for that source so anyone may check the entirety of source quoted, such as below:

Resized Image
"What's A Permalink?

The purpose of a permalink is so that any web page or e-mail message can include a direct link to a specific post. If you want to link to a specific post, right-click on the permalink, select "copy shortcut," and then paste that link wherever you like. "

The permalink for the Jersey Journal article cited above by GrovePath and Yvonne would be thus:

Sex offender working on Sandy campaign

The url to the article is "embedded" in the title so as not to cause this page to scroll horizontally which long urls posted will produce.

Point is always cite your source for third party info.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 16:02
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Re: Gunfire on Newark Ave tonight
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Crazy Dave should start a band and use this picture as an album cover.

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Posted on: 2007/5/19 15:13
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Re: Gunfire on Newark Ave tonight
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


After reading this article, Mr Murray needs to seek medical and psychiatric care immediately. If he is prepared to 'blow-up' with anger over double parking, how does he cope with other frustrating issues of life?
I am more concerned that he has a driver's licence, let alone a licence to sell guns.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 14:52
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Re: Whole Foods sought for Downtown
Newbie
Newbie


Went to the A&P yesterday for the first time since the renos. Yes, the produce is still overpriced (I'm a fan of Lee's on Grove myself), but there are a few noteworthy additions: the salad bar, the cheap takeout pizza, and the Ace Bakery breads (a welcome sight for this Canadian expat).

Still, I wish we'd get a Trader Joe's. I know it's not far to Union Square, but it's a pain lugging groceries on the PATH.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 14:33
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Pussies beating up an old woman. Pathetic. Jersey City needs to clean up the streets. Giuliani for Mayor!!!.. oh wait.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 13:49
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Newbie
Newbie


Well wouldn't it be great if some lawyer(s) actually dedicated some time to help these victims, help the community of Jersey City, and help the good of the nation as a whole by lending a legal hand in the matter - but perhaps seeing the wolfpack kids grow up and die before this actually happens is more likely - shame, oh well - dare to dream!

Posted on: 2007/5/19 13:36
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Home away from home
Home away from home


Quote:

fat-ass-bike wrote:
I for one have no legal experience, but just a general rule of thumb to know right from wrong. My question is, could this woman or victims in general, bring civil action against these kids or assailants once they are caught. Regardless if they have no money or not, it will be a debit hanging over their heads for life. This will have a greater impact then some small amount of time in a lock-up.


That's an interesting idea. I don't have any legal knowledge either, but I think a victim probably can bring a civil suit against his or her attacker. (I'm thinking back to OJ Simpson...the Brown family lost the criminal case but won the civil case)
Many people probably don't pursue it because of the cost, or because they want the experience to just be over.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 13:14
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Quite a regular
Quite a regular


Quote:

trp3 wrote:
i hope all the kids responsible die.


Agreed.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 13:00
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Home away from home
Home away from home


I for one have no legal experience, but just a general rule of thumb to know right from wrong. My question is, could this woman or victims in general, bring civil action against these kids or assailants once they are caught. Regardless if they have no money or not, it will be a debit hanging over their heads for life. This will have a greater impact then some small amount of time in a lock-up.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 12:56
My humor is for the silent blue collar majority - If my posts offend, slander or you deem inappropriate and seek deletion, contact the webmaster for jurisdiction.
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


I encountered a "wolfpack" about three weeks ago on Kennedy and Virginia around 6pm.

A group of them (15?), ran across Kennedy Boulevard against the light, causing cars to come to a screeching halt and jumped on top of cars (hoods and roofs) while laughing.

One of them took a rock and threw it directly at my car, luckily only hitting the door. I called the cops.

Is there any safe time to be out on the street?

Posted on: 2007/5/19 12:42
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Newbie
Newbie


This is absolutely appalling! Do we need to start our own wolfpacks to take back the streets? These kids are useless to society, useless to the world, useless to anyone - parents should be held accountable! The amount of cowardice is astonishing! I am speechless and incredibly angry at what this society has become. I am building a ship to sail us back to the old country - any help would be greatly appreciated.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 12:41
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Home away from home
Home away from home


What a terrible story.
Does anyone know if JC has provisions for the uninsured? Sliding scale at the hospital, etc? Not only will this woman have to carry the memory of this attack with her for the rest of her life, she will likely still be paying the medical bills too.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 12:33
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Re: Sex offender working for Bolden Cunningham's senate campaign
Home away from home
Home away from home


Gosh,

Without felons, where would Jersey City find people to run for office and manage campaigns...paging Gerry McCann. Sheesh, what's a little sex conviction, fraud, or mob involvement when you're talking about politics in a city with mayors that are jailed or mayors that play in the streets drunk and nude...par for the course.

Welcome to Jersey City!

Posted on: 2007/5/19 12:28
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Home away from home
Home away from home


Agreed, these people are animals. Animals that add zero to society.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 11:45
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Home away from home
Home away from home


i hope all the kids responsible die.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 9:15
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Re: West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
Home away from home
Home away from home


If you want to be a victim of crime, it appears that going shopping or walking around the streets on your own AFTER 12.00am is the time to be one. (even if its to reblemish your drug supply)
Yes, we should be able to wander the streets at anytime of the day, but you have to take into account the environment you live in and apply common sense!

If we could somehow arrange these 'wolfpacks' to prey on each other, so that they can feel the wrath and pain of an indiscrimate pack attack.

This issue sounds like a nasty game of human 'pac-man' but the ghostly figures always win.

PS. What happen to the Police rounding up all these young kids after a certain time at night?
Pull your finger out Comey!

Posted on: 2007/5/19 7:54
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Three vie for position of Hudson County Clerk in June 5 Dem primary
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Trio of contenders

Three vie for position of Hudson County Clerk in June 5 Dem primary

Ricardo Kaulessar - Hudson Reporter -- 05/18/2007

There are three contenders for the Hudson County Clerk's office in the June 5 Democratic primary.

Incumbent Mary Jane Desmond wants to keep the seat, and faces challenger Barbara Netchert.

Independent candidate James Farina is also running, but was unable to come to a scheduled interview and could not be reached for this article.

Desmond has served as the acting Hudson County clerk since 2006 when former clerk Javier Inclan stepped down to take a position in the administration of Gov. Jon Corzine.

It is a five-year term.

Desmond has worked in Hudson County government since 2003, much of that time as deputy county clerk.

Netchert is currently the head of the Jersey City Department of Housing, Economic Development & Commerce, and has worked in Jersey City government since 1988.

Farina is the long-time Hoboken City Clerk and member of the Hoboken Board of Education.

Who is backing them

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Netchert is running with the backing of the long-time Hudson County Democratic Organization (HCDO).

Desmond is the candidate for the recently-formed Democrats for Hudson County (DFHC).

Farina is running independently.

Both Netchert and Desmond spoke last week about why they want the job.

Like a well-oiled machine

When Desmond was interviewed, she was not feeling well and showed it in her voice, for which she apologized. "Despite the drone in my voice, I love my job," said Desmond.

She described it as "a lot of troubleshooting, a lot of customer service, but I am proud to have this opportunity to be Hudson County clerk."

Mary Jane Desmond was born and raised in Bayonne, the oldest of the 11 children. She attended St. Mary's Our Lady Star of the Sea grammar school, Holy Family Academy, and St. Peter's College. She also attended the New Jersey Professional School of Business, Securities Training Institute; the New York Institute of Finance, and the Rutgers University of Government Studies.

Her career has spanned both the public and the private, including her first 13 years of employment at Furman Selz, a Wall Street firm. Also, she has worked for six years at Christ Hospital in Jersey City.

Since 2003, she has been employed by Hudson County government, first as the confidential aide in the Finance and Administration Department.

She became Deputy County Clerk in 2004. When Javier Inclan left in late 2006, Desmond became the Acting County Clerk.

Desmond said she learned a great deal under Inclan and grew to admire him.

"He was quite an innovator and started a number of wonderful things in this office," Desmond said.

Desmond plans to do a number of her own "wonderful things" if she is elected to Hudson County Clerk.

One of the first things she plans to do is continuing to transfer records from paper to digital storage. This falls in line with her role as Hudson County Project Manager for NJ DARM PARIS Grant Program, which provides funding for Archives and Records Management.

"The county has been securing millions of dollars of grants to manage our records," Desmond said. "We have to destroy paper copy to save space and time."

Desmond also has plans to have county departments put more of their records online and to create a mechanism for the public to pay by credit card for copies of those records they seek.

And she plans to do whatever is necessary to keep the staff that currently works with her.

"I have a great staff that works in one of the three busiest county offices next to the Welfare Division and the county registrar," Desmond said. "This office is like a well-oiled machine."

'Ready to roll up her sleeves'

Desmond's challenger, Barbara Netchert, who is running on the HCDO line, says she sees herself as a public servant and not a politician. She is currently the executive director of the Jersey City Department of Housing, Economic Development and Commerce.

"This is all new and daunting for me," she said. "I find it hard to sell myself, my platform and my goals to people."

Running for county clerk is not like running for other political offices, she says, because it is more about her ability to do a job than it is about differing political positions.

She grew up in Union City, but has family in Weehawken. She is currently a resident of Jersey City.

"I've lived in Hudson County all of my life," she said.

What she brings to the job, she said, is her 18 years as a public servant. Netchert has worked for the city of Jersey City since 1989, under several administrations that included Jersey City Mayors Gerald McCann, Bret Schundler, Glenn Cunningham, L. Harvey Smith, and Jerramiah Healy.

As the executive director of development in Jersey City, Netchert has overseen many of the most significant development changes in Jersey City over the last decade, and has worked with municipal, county, and state leadership.

Over her career with Jersey City, Netchert has developed a good working relationship with County Executive Tom DeGise, on whose ticket she is running this year.

"He is remarkably fair and honest," she said. "I worked closely with him when he served as council president (for Jersey City City Council). In my position [in Jersey City], my bosses are the mayor and the nine council members. But I worked with a lot of people throughout the city and county."

Her husband, William Netchert, serves as the general counsel for the Hudson County Improvement Authority and as chairman for the Hudson County Community College Board of Trustees. He has close ties to DeGise going back to the early 1980s.

With her office over looking the Exchange Place, the Hudson River, and the site of the former World Trade Center, Barbara seems at the center of a beehive, with constant activity around her.

She admits she will miss the hustle and bustle of her current position - partly because of the central role economic development plays in the life of Jersey City.

"As county clerk I will be doing more constituent services," she said. "That is a change from what I have done over the last 18 years."

Prior to her service in economic development, Netchert worked as a paralegal in a law office and in real estate.

Overall, her career has made her familiar with many of the services the county clerk provides, including business filings, trade names, and corporate filings.

"I understand that as county clerk I will be dealing with a lot of paperwork," she said.

She said when DeGise proposed she run for the office, she was a little nervous. But after talking about the job with DeGise and former Hudson County Clerk Javier Inclan, she felt more confident about the election.

"I think Javier did a wonderful job," she said. "The more we talked about the job, the more I liked the idea."

She said she would like to pursue some of the initiatives Inclan started such as web-based access program and increased constituent services. She also said she would like to find a way for the clerk's office to again issue birth certificates. Three years ago, federal authorities closed down that aspect of the clerk's office because workers were charged with having provided false identification. Although Inclan played a large role in cleaning up the mess, federal authorities banned the issuing of birth certificates out of that office.

Netchert may look into providing a satellite office to serve residents in northern Hudson County.

In focusing on her qualities, Netchert said she is detailed oriented and good at multi-tasking, and that her years of experience in government have given her the tools she needs to handle the clerk's job.

"I'm ready to roll up my sleeves and go to work," she said. "But I'm open to suggestions as to how to do things, and I'm willing to listen to people and to work with the mayors."

In getting the word out to the public, she said, "I want people to know that I am an honest and hard-working individual, and that I can be beneficial in providing services to the public."

The reluctant candidate

There's a third candidate for Hudson County Clerk - longtime Hoboken City Clerk and Hoboken Board of Education member James Farina.

Why is Farina running, after being such a longtime staple of Hoboken City Hall?

Farina rescheduled an interview that was originally set up for last week, and was unable to be reached for an interview since.

Farina is a lifelong resident of Hoboken and product of the Hoboken School System. In 1974, he was elected to serve as a member of the Hoboken Board of Education. He has been serving continuously since then. During his tenure on the board, he has served as president, vice-president, and chairman of athletics.

He pioneered the efforts to rebuild the Hoboken High School stadium. Years ago, he also championed the right of a Hoboken girl to play Little League baseball.

Farina is married to his wife Patricia and they are the proud parents of two children.

Recently, Farina's name got into the newspapers over a nutty incident that took place in Hoboken City Hall on March 28. Police were called to City Hall because of an alleged verbal dispute in Mayor David Roberts' office between him and Farina. Rumors said that the dispute was about politics.

Eventually, the pair patched things up, and Farina was the only Hoboken school board candidate whom Roberts publicly endorsed in that city's April school board election.

Ricardo Kaulessar can be reached at rkaulessar@hudsonreporter.com.

Al Sullivan can be reached at asullivan@hudsonreporter.com

Posted on: 2007/5/19 6:35
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Who will represent southern Jersey City?
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Who will represent southern Jersey City?

Four candidates vie for two seats in 31st District Assembly

Al Sullivan and Ricardo Kaulessar
Hudson Reporter -- 05/18/2007

Four candidates running in the June 5 Democratic primary to fill two seats in the state Assembly for the 31st District - which includes southern Jersey City and all of Bayonne.

Of those four candidates, two live in Jersey City, and two live in Bayonne.

Residents can vote for any two in the primary, whether they are on the same or different slates. The top two vote-getters will face two Republicans in November.

In each state election district in Hudson County - the 31st, 32nd and 33rd - there is one contested state Senate position and two Assembly positions.

Recently, a rival Democratic organization called the Democrats for Hudson County (DFHC) formed in order to take on the longtime Hudson County Democratic Organization (HCDO).

On the HCDO ticket, former Jersey City Council President L. Harvey Smith and Bayonne Councilman Anthony Chiappone are running for the two Assembly seats.

On the DFHC ticket, Bayonne Local Redevelopment Agency Executive Director Nicholas Chiaravalloti and Daycare Center Proprietor Sheila Newton-Moses are running for those same seats.

Anthony Chiappone

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AOT 2007

For Chiappone, this year's election is filled with strange twists of fate.

Although he has held public office since first being elected in 1998, Chiappone says he has always seen himself as the underdog, the perpetual outsider constantly trying to reform government.

This year, however, he is running on a ticket supported by the Hudson County Democratic Organization (HCDO) - which has always opposed his candidacies in the past.

He took office as a Bayonne councilman in 1999, often serving as a solo voice of dissent, carrying on a tradition he had started as a community activist in 1994.

In 2003, he was part of a ticket headed by former Jersey City Mayor Glenn Cunningham that successfully defeated then-Assemblyman Joseph Doria in the primary, and Chiappone served from 2004 to 2005 as the Assemblyman for the 31st District.

Oddly enough, some of Chiappone's anti-corruption legislation was passed last year - after he was no longer serving.

"Some of my measures were included in legislation last year," he said. "I'm very proud to be credited with those laws."

While a member of the Assembly, Chiappone served on the Housing and Local Government Committee, the Senior Issues Committee, and the Telecommunications and Utilities Committee.

In 2004, Chiappone challenged Doria in a special election for state Senate and was defeated. A Doria/HCDO ticket then pushed Chiappone out of the state Assembly in the 2005 primary.

Chiappone's Assembly career is marked by a focus on particular issues, such as fighting and punishing corruption, and reducing wasteful spending.

But he said he is aware of the needs of the district and hopes to work toward expanding job opportunities for local residents and by helping foster industrial growth in the area.

"People don't just want houses to live in; they need places to work," he said, referring to how he feels MOTBY ought to be developed. "We have numerous other sites where we can locate housing. But we need jobs in Bayonne and I think the base [MOTBY] is a good place to locate them."

For this reason, he said he has an open mind when it comes to possibly locating a container-port operation on part of MOTBY. He said the state has already expressed an interest in expanding rail operations to the area and providing road improvements and an enhanced N.J. Turnpike interchange.

"Bayonne used to be a city in which people could live and work," he said. "When I was a kid, I had a choice of working for places like Wesson Oil, Exxon-Texaco, or Best Foods. Ultimately, I had chose Best Foods. But now we have no choices, and with the plans being made, Bayonne may soon become a town with a commuter population."

Affordable housing is an issue in both Bayonne and Jersey City, and Chiappone said he had worked with then-Assemblyman Albio Sires to sponsor legislation that would help make up for reductions in federal Section 8 affordable housing programs.

"When the federal government cut back, the state stepped in," Chiappoine said, noting that he is continually looking to expand programs to help first-time home ownership. "People need to be able to afford to buy into their own neighborhoods. This is not possible with the housing planned for MOTBY. That housing is for people coming into Bayonne from out of town. Not for people who live here."

If elected, Chiappone promises to open a legislative office in Bayonne. Currently, Bayonne has none.

"What I learned when I had an office here is how much in constituent services we provide," he said. "This could be anything from acting as a notary public to helping people fill out applications for Homestead rebates. We also helped people with getting copies of birth certificates from Trenton."

For Chiappone, one of his priorities will be addressing property taxes. He claims that rising taxes are one of the most significant reasons some senior citizens can no longer live in their own homes.

"Many of the problems we are facing today need a new way of thinking to solve," he said. "I have always been someone who thinks outside the box. While not everything I have come up with will work, I am always looking for new ideas and trying new things to see what will work. I believe that's the way we will find solutions, and that's what makes me different from other candidates running for the Assembly."

One proposal Chiappone made while still an Assemblyman was recently picked up by Senator Doria.

"I asked why the money from a winning lottery ticket couldn't go to help the municipal budget if someone fails to claim it," he said. "This would be a windfall for the local municipality, allow the money to circulate locally, and wouldn't cost the state anything."

He also wants to find a way to change state contract laws to give local vendors an advantage in competitive bidding.

"I would like to see the law changed so that if a local vendor comes within a certain percentage of the lowest bid, local governments can award the contract to the local company," he said. "This would have benefits in keeping the money in the local ecconomy and providing local jobs."

Nicholas Chiaravalloti

This is Nicholas Chiaravalloti's first run for elected office.

But Chiaravalloti has served in several key posts in Bayonne, such as director of constituent services, and executive director of the Bayonne Local Redevelopment Agency (BLRA). He eventually joined the staff of now-Sen. Robert Menendez, who was then a U.S. Representative.

In preparing for this election, Chiaravalloti resigned his position as state director for the Senator's office.

He sees his team as presenting voters with a choice.

"My opponents represent the established status quo," he said. "If you like the way things are going in Trenton, you shouldn't vote for me. But if you're frustrated with your property taxes increasing every year, with the impossibly high cost of health care, with the gang violence in our streets, with the threatened bankruptcy of local hospitals, and with so much more, then you and I have something to talk about."

As a younger man, Chiaravalloti had an interest in elected office. He took part in Doria campaigns and also served an internship with the mayor.

"I learned a lot about how things work," he said. "Joe opened his door and showed me what it's like inside. This was my introduction into politics."

Chiaravalloti said Doria, former Rep. Joe LeFante, and former Bayonne Mayor Dennis Collins became mentors to him, allowing him to learn the nuts and bolts of politics and leadership. Over time, he got to work with people from both political parties, including Gov. Tom Kean, although like many younger Democrats, he came of age in the 1992 campaign to elect Bill Clinton president.

"I got to meet a lot of different people," he said. "It was a lot of fun."

He was in college then and went on to law school, later focusing more on public service than on politics. In 1998, he took up work in the Assembly Democratic office. After Doria became mayor, he took up work as director of policy and planning for the city.

"I worked on implementing Mayor Doria's vision from the 1998 mayoral campaign," he said.

In 2000, Chiaravalloti became the executive director of the BLRA, charged with helping with the city's takeover of the former Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY).

In some ways, this brought together many elements of Chiaravalloti's life, allowing him to use his skills as an attorney, his training in business, and his desire to work in public service.

"It was a public body, but also independent," he said.

Then and now, he sees MOTBY as the great hope for a bright future in Bayonne, providing the residents of the city with access to New York Harbor for the first time in more than half a century. Under his watch, BLRA negotiated a rare agreement with the federal government that allowed the BLRA to do environmental cleanup, promising to accomplish the chore in a fraction of the time that it would take the Army Corps of Engineers. The city also successfully bargained for the base to be given to the city for free.

But with much of the groundwork done for future development of the MOTBY, Chiaravalloti began to look toward other opportunities, leaving the BLRA in 2002 for what he thought would be a career in the private sector.

At that point, then-Rep. Robert Menendez reached out to him and asked Chiaravalloti to take a position in his district office. When Menendez moved up to become U.S. Senator, Chiaravalloti went with him.

But now, the old itch that he felt as a young man returned, and when he was offered a chance to run for the state Assembly, Chiaravalloti took it, resigning his position with Menendez with the hopes that his gamble will succeed.

Despite his lack of elected-office credentials, Chiaravalloti brings a significant amount of legislative experience to this election. He has been involved at the state and federal levels for more than a decade, and has firsthand experience on issues from urban, suburban and rural areas not only throughout the state, but also on national issues such as international trade and how projects are funded.

"My job as an Assemblyman from the 31st District is to look out for the interests of people here and make sure that we get our fair share of the tax dollars," he said. "We face some serious challenges in Bayonne and Jersey City."

Local hospitals are in financial trouble and former manufacturing sites need to be cleaned up and redeveloped. Jobs are also hugely important, and Chiaravalloti is familiar with Menendez's concept for a Liberty Corridor zone for manufacturing, transport, imports and other activities, which could help generate jobs here.

One of Chiaravalloti's objectives would be to help relieve residents of what is sometimes called "the middle-class squeeze," in which job growth and wages do not keep up with the cost of living.

"People are under a lot of pressure to make it on a daily basis, and we as elected officials must do something to help them," he said. "Government is not the answer to it all, but it is part of the solution. The government must work for the people."

Sheila Newton-Moses

Sheila Newton-Moses, who said she was in her thirties, was born and raised on the island of Antigua. She came with her parents to the U.S. as a teenager, settling in Jersey City.

She finished her schooling at Lincoln High School in Jersey City. She then went on to St. Peter's College in Jersey City, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with a minor in Secondary Education.

Newton-Moses has continued to follow the education track in her life, earning her degree from Columbia University's Teachers College and currently is pursuing a Doctorate of Education through Walden University in Baltimore, Md.

Newton-Moses has also embraced the business side and has recently completed the Mini MBA program at Rutgers University in Piscataway.

Both education - her first love - and business has helped her to succeed as the president and CEO of the Sunnyside Academy, a chain of daycare centers located in Jersey City. She also brings nearly 10 years of experience as an academic coordinator at the Urban League of Hudson County and at Hudson County Community College. She also worked with the Jersey City Public Schools in developing preschools.

Newton-Moses said her experiences are beneficial to her running for office.

"I believe I am a good candidate based on the experiences I have," Newton-Moses said.

Newton-Moses said one of her first tasks if elected is to work for the children of her district.

"Early childcare is important to me," Newton-Moses said. "I am going to work toward providing children with opportunities by getting more state funding for after school programs.

Newton-Moses also said she would like to look at building new schools specifically in Downtown Jersey City, where she sees many new families moving into the area. And she wants to work toward libraries devoted exclusively to children in Jersey City and Bayonne.

Another goal is jobs for unemployed Jersey City and Bayonne residents, particularly those young men who have just served in jail.

"I am looking to expand job opportunities for those young men who paid their debt to society," Newton-Moses said. "I am hoping to work on an expungement bill for young men so that they can be pardoned and go back into society."

Expungement is a process by which those who have been previously imprisoned for minor crimes can have their records erased, so they would not be used against them getting any future employment.

Also, she plans, if elected to the Assembly, to seek funding to get more affordable housing built in Jersey City and Bayonne. She points to development of luxury housing in both towns from Downtown Jersey City to the Military Ocean Terminal in Bayonne.

"More affordable housing and more subsidized housing is what I will be fighting for," Newton-Moses said. "There's a lot of housing being built that is not keeping up with the job growth and there is a lot of pressure on the typical homeowner to keep up with the expense of owning a house."

On the issue of housing, Newton-Moses also plans to tackle property taxes, with Bayonne paying the second highest property taxes in Hudson County next to Kearny.

"It's plaguing too many residents and I need to look at that to be able to help people stay in their communities," Newton-Moses said.

One controversial issue that Newton-Moses hopes to deal with is the intimidation that government employees face from their bosses when it comes to their political affiliations. That is an especially touchy issue in Hudson County.

"I will be taking a very hard stance on ensuring people should feel they can vote for whomever they want without being subject to harassment," Newton-Moses said. "We can't have a hostile environment; we must have order and civility. It feels like we are living in a Communist country. That is anti-American."

L. Harvey Smith

L. Harvey Smith comes to the primary election having worn a lot of governmental hats over his career. A former teacher and currently an undersheriff for Hudson County, Smith served 12 years on the Jersey City council, where he served in his last term as council president. After the untimely death of then state Sen. and Mayor Glenn Cunningham in 2004, Smith served as acting mayor, and then interim state Senator.

Interviewed at his Montgomery Street headquarters, Smith was surrounded by voter lists and ringing telephones. The office is within a few blocks of the Greenville neighborhood where he was raised, and where he has spent most of his life. Well-known on the City Council as the driving force behind public works projects in the largely African-American Ward F, Smith laid out his election agenda in very specific terms.

"I have some state level experience, and I'm not controlled by anyone," he said.

He said saving local hospitals and improving health care are key concerns for the 31st Legislative District that includes all of Bayonne and the southern portion of Jersey City.

"We have to look into funding health care," he said. "I believe in universal healthcare. This was something that was proposed in 1993 by President [Bill] Clinton. I do not believe politics should be involved in this. It is too serious a matter."

He said hospitals are a major part of health care, and that if the hospitals shut down, people - especially the most vulnerable - will have no place to go.

"Illness recognizes no gender, race, or religion," he said. "Some people can afford to pay for their health care. If is not fair to close a pediatric unit - women will continue to have babies, and we cannot afford to close down acute care units. This must be a concern of Democrats as well as Republicans. This is about people not politics."

He said some other important issues in the district include rising crime in Jersey City, and rising taxes in both Jersey City and Bayonne.

Crime often rises when there is a lack of job opportunities, he said, and pointed to failings of the government to provide adequate training. He said welfare-to-work programs were never properly implemented. He said job creation, drug rehabilitation, and retraining are all essential elements in solving crime.

While new technology seems to be the foundation of new job growth, he also said that the government must be sensitive to the needs of the people, pointing out that blue collar working class jobs helped make Hudson County and American strong.

"These jobs can continue to be the strength of our nation, but union protections are eroding and the cost of living is rising," he said. "This makes middle class people feel like they are more lower class. We need to realize that to solve crime, we need more jobs, not bigger jails."

Welfare and public housing projects were always meant to be temporary solutions until people could move up the economic ladder as people gain more skills and get better educations. He said he believed in regionalizing minimum wage so that people in areas like the New York region with higher cost of living would be paid more.

"Seven dollars an hour may be fine in other parts of the country, but with housing costs here, and the higher cost of living, people can barely survive," he said.

Street gangs, Smith noted, are not a new phenomena, and he said in some sense they are attractive to kids who are seeking security, an enclave and some sense of self esteem. But they are havens for illegal drugs, which is as big an industry in America as many legal industries such as the growing of corn or wheat.

Efforts to combat illegal drugs have taken many roads, such as curing the physical, social even spiritual problems, but not the economic situation.

In this regard, education plays a large role in helping people, but schools and teachers can't be the only resource.

"I believe that if you work hard, study and live by the rules, you can achieve anything," Smith said. "But you can't have people changing the rules in secret. Things need to be fair for everyone."

Smith grimly admits that he has been misunderstood in the past.

"I think I'm one of the most misunderstood political figures in Hudson County," he said. "People who know me have a different idea. But some people mistake my honesty for arrogance. Yet if they don't want to hear the truth, why are they asking the questions?"

Al Sullivan can be reached at asullivan@hudsonreporter.com. Ricardo Kaulessar can be reached at rkaulessar@hudsonreporter.com

Posted on: 2007/5/19 6:32
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West Side: woman beaten by teen 'wolfpack' as others cheered.
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Home away from home


'OUT FOR BLOOD'
Beaten by 'wolfpack' as others cheered

Saturday, May 19, 2007
By MICHAELANGELO CONTE
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

A Jersey City woman who was attacked by a pack of boys and girls early Tuesday morning suffered a fractured eye socket, broken jaw and a more than an inch-long cut over one eye.

"They are animals, a bunch of animals," Jane Congema, 44, of Jewett Avenue, said yesterday about three individuals who beat and robbed her of $2.50 at Summit and Jewett avenues, and the roughly five other individuals who rooted them on.

Congema said she walked to a store around 12:30 a.m. but found it closed. As she was making her way home, three boys jumped her and began punching her.

"As one of them pulled me down to the ground by my throat, he said, 'Where's your money?'

"They were going through my clothes like I was nothing, like I was a dead body," Congema said of the attack, which was one of several that night.

"There was a pool of blood and all I could think was 'Where is it coming from?'" said Congema, who said she escaped when the pack turned their attention to someone else.

As she stumbled home, an ambulance happened by and took her to the Jersey City Medical Center. There were so many fractures around her eye the doctors couldn't count them, she said.

Congema said she underwent her first surgery Tuesday and will need at least one more, but doesn't haven't health insurance to cover it.

At least two other violent robberies in the same vicinity took place early Tuesday morning. Police aren't certain if they are related.

"Tell Comey this was a 'wolf pack' - they were out for blood and they got mine," Congema said, referring to a previous story in which Comey took The Jersey Journal to task for labeling as a "wolf pack" a group of feuding teens.

Comey didn't quibble about the term yesterday. "We have combated these groups in the past and continue to do so now," Comey said.

The investigation to find Congema's attackers continues, police said.

Posted on: 2007/5/19 6:28
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Jersey Journal's Politicial Insider Column: Some candidates taking things very personal
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Here is the Jersey Journal's Politicial Insider Column

Some candidates taking things very personal

Saturday, May 19, 2007

Pull up the drawbridges, place garlic on your doors, grab your torches and pitchforks, and hide the women and children. Assemblymen Brian P. Stack of Union City and Lou Manzo of Jersey City are terrorizing Hudson County with their corruption, strong-arm tactics, and big boss behavior.

At least this is the campaign approach being taken by the ruling Hudson County Democratic Organization against Stack and Manzo, Senate candidates in the 33rd and 31st districts, respectively.

It is a classic mud-slinging campaign that not only hopes to have some of the mud stick, but, according to several professional political consultants, is usually designed to turn the average voter off. Fewer voters is usually an advantage for the incumbent.

Earlier this week, U.S. Rep. Albio Sires of West New York headed a contingent of Democrats for Hudson County that held a press conference on the steps of Weehawken Township Hall. The congressman admonished "my former Councilman Sal Vega" for engaging in the nasty attacks. Vega is in contention with Stack for the Senate seat nomination on behalf of the HCDO.

The next day in the Journal, HCDO campaign ad guru Paul Swibinski pointed out that Sires was mayor during a time when the West New York Police Department was awash in a corruption scandal. It was noted that Paul forgot that Vega was the town's Public Safety director when the federal indictments were handed up.

At the press conference, Weehawken Mayor Richard Turner lauded Stack's devotion to his constituents and said the entire issue is about politics.

Turner announced that Stack and the other DFHC candidates will no longer personally respond to "negative charges" and instead concentrate on issues - which is really not as much fun.

It didn't stop Stack from attacking Vega without ever naming him.

"He's not even a real candidate," said the assemblyman, who is also mayor of Union City. "He's just the face of the HCDO - the real candidate."

Stack was fuming over a recent piece of HCDO literature calling him the most corrupt mayor in Hudson County.

It brings up a question. If one is the most corrupt - who are the least corrupt?

Naturally, on Thursday, Vega held a press conference with more proof of Stack's bossism, producing several former Union City employees who claimed to have been fired after refusing to support Stack's campaign.

Then the Cuban thing happened.

Cuba Day Parade President Emilio Del Valle, a Union City employee, and others showed up at the press conference demanding to know why Vega had refused to grant a permit for the annual Cuba Day Parade. Vega refused to answer and escaped into his RV while Spanish-language cursing and shoving erupted among supporters. In other words, a typical North Hudson political argument.

Apparently, Vega, a Cuban-American, took a big chance. Rather than watch Stack parade through his town on Bergenline Avenue as the virtual grand marshal, Vega declined a permit for the June 3 parade. Vega has a different reason.

He criticized the parade for crass commercialism and for not mentioning "the desperate needs of the Cuban people." His moral concern came after having marched in the parade every year while in elected office.

For several decades, the parade, in one form or another, has had a line of march on Bergenline Avenue from North Bergen to Union City.

West New York Commissioner Gerald Lange Jr. did not show at the town's Tuesday reorganization meeting. It may have had something to do with a discussion held by Lange and some other commissioners about a possible power grab on the commission. Unfortunately, one of the conspirators squealed to Vega, who then confronted Lange - thus the shouting match heard by quite a few town workers.

In the last column, it was mentioned that the Sicilian Citizens Club of Bayonne would endorse Manzo for Senate and local son Nick Chiaravalotti for Assembly in the 31st, but not incumbent Joe Cassidy for Hudson County sheriff. Well, we're a bit chagrined to learn that Sheriff Joe was endorsed by the club on Monday. Don't shoot, sheriff.

POLITICAL INSIDER Agustin Torres can be reached at atorres@jjournal.com

Posted on: 2007/5/19 6:10
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Re: Sex offender working for Bolden Cunningham's senate campaign
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Here is the Jersey Journal's article

Sex offender working on Sandy campaign

Saturday, May 19, 2007
By JARRETT RENSHAW
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

A Jersey City man convicted of sexually assaulting a 13-year-old girl has played a role in the state Senate campaign of Sandra Bolden Cunningham, a role that's included going door-to-door to collect petition signatures.

Russell Wallace, 45, was convicted in 1999 of aggravated sexual assault and endangering the welfare of a child after he sexually assaulted a 13-year-old girl in his Jersey City home in 1997.

Wallace, then 37, was sentenced to 26 years, according to a Hudson County assistant prosecutor quoted in a published report at the time.

A state appellate court later reversed the decision and sent it back to Hudson County Superior Court for a new trial, where he was again found guilty, but sentenced to 15 years, according to court records.

In January 2005, Wallace was paroled from jail, having spent less than four years behind bars, according to the New Jersey Department of Corrections.

Wallace, a registered sex offender, entered into Jersey City's Second Chance Program, which was created by Bolden Cunningham's late husband, Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham. Bolden Cunningham remains a vocal supporter of the program, and Wallace wanted to show his gratitude by joining the campaign, said Roger Jones, a spokesman for Bolden Cunningham.

"The goal is to provide work for people who made mistakes when they were young. He paid his debt to a society," Jones said.

Noting Wallace is still assisting the campaign, Jones added: "Our door is open to anyone who wants to volunteer. We are not passing judgment on anybody."

Wallace is not listed on the online registry of sex offenders, but authorities confirmed he should be.

As a volunteer, Wallace collected hundreds of petition signatures for Bolden Cunningham's campaign, but those signatures were thrown out when it was discovered he was ineligible to vote due to his conviction.

"Nobody should be bringing people who molested young children into neighborhoods to campaign. It shows a lack of judgment," said Bolden Cunningham's opponent, Assemblyman Lou Manzo. "It's just common sense."

Wallace once served as a commissioner of the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency, and former Jersey City Mayor Bret Schundler appointed him to serve on the city's Ethical Standards Board.

Schundler came under fire after Wallace was hired as a civilian employee in the Police Department while the sexual assault charges were pending. Police officials protested the hire and Wallace did not keep the job.

============================

Posted on: 2007/5/19 6:09
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Re: Sex offender working for Bolden Cunningham's senate campaign
Home away from home
Home away from home



Posted on: 2007/5/18 23:23
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Re: Sex offender working for Bolden Cunningham's senate campaign
Home away from home
Home away from home


Hold up, what newspaper is this from? Second, do you or anyone else around you work for any rival politician of Cunningham? Third, How can you put an article without saying who wrote it? And last, if this is true, how in hell was that guy allowed to serve only 4 years out of a 15 year sentence?

Posted on: 2007/5/18 22:30
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Re: The liquor store building on the corner of Brunswick & Newark Avenue is trying to become 4 stories
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Home away from home


Wait, what's going to happen to Binny's? Are you saying he might close?! NOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Where am I going to go to buy cheap liquor now?

Oh, it was so nice having a liquor store only a block away....farewell Binny.

Posted on: 2007/5/18 21:45
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